Rain Rotttttttttt!
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Rain Rotttttttttt!

This is a discussion on Rain Rotttttttttt! within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Can i put baby oil on my goats skin its really dry from rain rott
  • Rain scald

Like Tree2Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    11-04-2012, 05:06 PM
  #1
Foal
Rain Rotttttttttt!

My poor baby has developed rain rot all over his side and butt.

I think there were two factors involved, one being the fact that he's been unblanketed in the rain (would normally have a rain sheet on him, but his was in for repairs, and I unfortunately don't have a spare), and from sharing his favourite rubbing post with his new girlfriend/pasture mate.

It's gotten very cold here so I'm unable to give him a bath, so I'm wondering if there were any remedies (other than the obvious washing of everything, frequent grooming, etc) that I could try to help get rid of the irritation.

Thanks in advance!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    11-04-2012, 05:16 PM
  #2
Foal
Well it all depends on your resources I guess.
Any type of antiseptic treatment should help to clear it up and provide relief from the itching. Nature's aid it my personal favourite. But if you can't get it, anything with tea tree oil or even just iodine will kill the bacteria. Remember it's all about stopping the bacteria from spreading.
Hopefully you can keep him dry, and even put some human foot-powder antifungal treatment on the hot spots once it clears up, to prevent it from coming back.
Since it's a bacterial fungus you're fighting, it's not going to get any better if you treat it, then put him back out unprotected in the rain. A dry coat and antiseptic/antifungal treatment will be you're best friend :)
     
    11-04-2012, 05:17 PM
  #3
Foal
Oh yes, I just thought. You may want to check the other horse that he's been sharing the fence post with for rain rot as well :)
     
    11-04-2012, 05:24 PM
  #4
Foal
I'll definitely be heading out to look at some anti-fungal treatments for him!

I got his blankets back today, and will be able to have him blanketed from now on, so he'll be nice and dry. It totally figures that it pours down rain the same 4 days I have his blankets in for repairs, I was just trying to beat the snow!

I checked the mare, and she's full of it. So I contacted her owner, and washed down the fence posts and other rubbing areas to help stop the spread.

Thanks so much for your help! :)
     
    11-04-2012, 05:33 PM
  #5
Ink
Weanling
MTG has worked great for me! We typically have damp winters here and my horse is outside 24/7. She developed a bad case of rain rot last year and the MTG cleared it right up. The only down side, is the stuff smells like rotting bacon. But if you can deal with your horse being stinky and greasy for a couple weeks, it definitely works.
Mochachino likes this.
     
    11-04-2012, 06:19 PM
  #6
Foal
No problem! Sounds like you are on the right track for treating the horses and stopping the spread! Good luck! Remember to disinfect the brushes as well. And don't share them or blankets among horses.
MTG does really work too! I believe it is the hickory that gives it the smell. Plus it is greasy so it will help to repel any water. And it makes their coat,mane and tail look great!
     
    11-04-2012, 06:20 PM
  #7
Foal
No problem! Sounds like you are on the right track for treating the horses and stopping the spread! Good luck! Remember to disinfect the brushes as well. And don't share them or blankets among horses.
MTG does really work too! I believe it is the hickory that gives it the smell. Plus it is greasy so it will help to repel any water. And it makes their coat,mane and tail look great!
     
    11-04-2012, 06:23 PM
  #8
Foal
Ugh sorry for the double post. Still trying to get used to this in mobile
     
    11-04-2012, 07:37 PM
  #9
Super Moderator
You do not need to treat it at all. It is not contagious as it is caused by bacteria and/or fungi that are present in all soil and is found on most horse's skin.

Rain Rot or Rain Scald and lice are almost always nutrition related. Feeding adequate levels of Vitamin A will prevent almost all cases of rain rot and lice as well as many other conditions that occur mostly in horses with no access to green grass or in the winter and early spring when Vitamin A stores are depleted or intake is inadequate when horses are stabled. Other conditions related to a Vitamin A deficiency are:

1) Rough hair coat. Predisposition for getting skin conditions like rain rot and lice. These horses can look wormy even when they are not.


2) Goopy, runny, crusty eyes.

3) Mares failing to ovulate or conceive.

4) Mares failing to drop their afterbirth within 30 minutes of foaling.

I have recommended that several people initiate a program of supplementing vitamin A, especially during the late fall, winter and early spring months and all have reported having rain rot and lice disappear without any further medicating or treating.

There are several ways to supplement Vitamin A. If a horse is seriously deficient, I recommend using the injectable form of Vitamin A only just give it orally and not in shot form. Start with about 5 cc and just squirt it into the horse's mouth. Then follow it up with 2 - 5 cc a week. You can get it at any feed or farm store that caters to stockmen. It is a non-prescription item or you can get it shipped from any one of several catalogs like Jeffers or Valley Vet.

This should be followed up with a good supplement that has high levels of Vitamin A. Farnam has a product called "Mare Plus". It will prevent rain rot and other conditions related to Vitamin A.

Vitamin A deficiency frequently is accompanied by a mineral deficiency -- mainly a Calcium deficiency. I feed a loose mineral supplement that contains high levels of Vitamin A plus Calcium, Magnesium and zinc. Since feeding it, I have not had ONE SINGLE CASE of Rain Rot or of lice. All but 4 or 5 of our 60 horses run out with no shelters other than trees, etc on large pastures. Most are not fed grain but only get free-choice winter pasture and/or free-choice round bales of mature grass hay. They get very little Beta Carotene (the precursor of Vitamin A) or Vitamin A from their diet.

When I get in a new horse with rain rot, I do not do anything other than put it on good feed and supplement Vitamin A. I will use oral Vitamin A for 3 or 4 weeks until just keeping out our mineral can take over.
     
    11-04-2012, 08:40 PM
  #10
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
You do not need to treat it at all. It is not contagious as it is caused by bacteria and/or fungi that are present in all soil and is found on most horse's skin.

Rain Rot or Rain Scald and lice are almost always nutrition related. Feeding adequate levels of Vitamin A will prevent almost all cases of rain rot and lice as well as many other conditions that occur mostly in horses with no access to green grass or in the winter and early spring when Vitamin A stores are depleted or intake is inadequate when horses are stabled. Other conditions related to a Vitamin A deficiency are:

1) Rough hair coat. Predisposition for getting skin conditions like rain rot and lice. These horses can look wormy even when they are not.


2) Goopy, runny, crusty eyes.

3) Mares failing to ovulate or conceive.

4) Mares failing to drop their afterbirth within 30 minutes of foaling.

I have recommended that several people initiate a program of supplementing vitamin A, especially during the late fall, winter and early spring months and all have reported having rain rot and lice disappear without any further medicating or treating.

There are several ways to supplement Vitamin A. If a horse is seriously deficient, I recommend using the injectable form of Vitamin A only just give it orally and not in shot form. Start with about 5 cc and just squirt it into the horse's mouth. Then follow it up with 2 - 5 cc a week. You can get it at any feed or farm store that caters to stockmen. It is a non-prescription item or you can get it shipped from any one of several catalogs like Jeffers or Valley Vet.

This should be followed up with a good supplement that has high levels of Vitamin A. Farnam has a product called "Mare Plus". It will prevent rain rot and other conditions related to Vitamin A.

Vitamin A deficiency frequently is accompanied by a mineral deficiency -- mainly a Calcium deficiency. I feed a loose mineral supplement that contains high levels of Vitamin A plus Calcium, Magnesium and zinc. Since feeding it, I have not had ONE SINGLE CASE of Rain Rot or of lice. All but 4 or 5 of our 60 horses run out with no shelters other than trees, etc on large pastures. Most are not fed grain but only get free-choice winter pasture and/or free-choice round bales of mature grass hay. They get very little Beta Carotene (the precursor of Vitamin A) or Vitamin A from their diet.

When I get in a new horse with rain rot, I do not do anything other than put it on good feed and supplement Vitamin A. I will use oral Vitamin A for 3 or 4 weeks until just keeping out our mineral can take over.
Can we just sticky this?
I'm so tired of the plethora of RR posts.
Trinity3205 likes this.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fantastic Recipe for Rain Scald/ Rain Rot treatment! Conrad And Freddie Horse Health 13 11-17-2013 12:29 AM
Home Remedies for Rain rot/rain scalds... Elizabeth Bowers Horse Health 9 04-18-2012 07:23 AM
rain SarahAnn Horse Breeds 0 10-24-2011 11:02 PM
Rain Rot appy rider 4 life Horse Health 11 03-18-2009 03:35 PM
Rain, Rain...Please Friggin' Go Away!!!! Small_Town_Girl Horse Talk 15 08-21-2008 01:47 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0