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Really bad case

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  • Really bad pictures

 
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    06-02-2010, 04:52 PM
  #21
Weanling
Thank you all for the advice. I wanted to update with a recent picture.
Her treatment is :
- we wash the wounds with water then Hydrogen peroxide then with normal saline solution and finally with ether iodoform. And we put another powder, but I don't know it's name.
- then we bandage the wound, the one from the hoof.
We finished the treatment with antibiotics for now. The doctor told us to stop for a period and then to give her antibiotics again.

Here is the picture with the wound from her shoulder. The picture is taken before the treatment.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 2010-06-02_235149.jpg (56.9 KB, 173 views)
     
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    06-02-2010, 05:06 PM
  #22
Showing
Evans, it's not her shoulder I'm worried about, it's her feet.

How are her feet holding up, and what's been done about the foot with no hoof?
     
    06-02-2010, 05:22 PM
  #23
Banned
I hope I'm not to late in posting this comment... I didn't read all the other so I don't know if she's been put down already...

When Barbaro the racehorse broke his leg, they put him on a thing that wrapped around his stomach and lifted him up off the ground. It made it so that he didn't have to put any weight on his leg, so that it could recover. I don't know if this would help with the horse's hoof, but its worth a shot.

I say that you should really try and give her a chance, but if all else fails, put her down.
     
    06-02-2010, 05:27 PM
  #24
Weanling
Well, the foot is in the same condition. I don't know what to do with it. Today I was there to clean her wounds. I cleaned the both wounds and treated them, and now we wait. The doctors told us to clean the wounds daily and to bandage only the foot. I didn't took pictures with the foot because I didn't saw any improvement, it's exactly the same as the last ones. I'm happy because it isn't worse, I was expecting to see that wound in a worse condition. The only bad thing is the smell ...
It's really hard to treat a horse with this wounds, I'm so sorry for her when I see that she's in pain or when I see her walking in three legs. She doesn't use the injured foot. That's a good thing only because we know for sure that she still has senses in that leg. The flesh is pink and it looks healthy there so I wait for the tissue to regenerate.
I'm still preoccupied for laminitis in the other legs but the doctor wasn't preoccupied by it. I hate the doctors, but we must work with this one. In the whole city there are just 3 horse doctors. He didn't say a thing about standing wraps. The mare is laying down to rest, but unfortunately she's laying down exactly on the left side, the one with the shoulder wound.
     
    06-02-2010, 05:32 PM
  #25
Trained
If she spends a lot of time laying down, you'll want to roll her over every half hour or so. Or at least keep her upright. Laying on one side for too long can cause such things as muscle atrophy.

I'm with everyone else on this matter, the poor mare should be put down and the money spent on saving a horse with a higher chance of life. But what can you do.

If you're concerned, talk to the vet about laminitis in her other legs, and do some research on it. Also, I'd have her on paper bedding. It's less likely to cause irritation to either wound.
     
    06-02-2010, 05:36 PM
  #26
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelWithoutWings54    
When Barbaro the racehorse broke his leg, they put him on a thing that wrapped around his stomach and lifted him up off the ground. It made it so that he didn't have to put any weight on his leg, so that it could recover. I don't know if this would help with the horse's hoof, but its worth a shot.
The sling will get her up off her injured foot for awhile, but a horse can't stay in a sling indefinitely because it's too hard on them physically to be hung where their feet can't touch the ground.

Barbaro isn't exactly a good example, since he was put down because he developed laminitis in his uninjured feet because he couldn't put weight on his injured leg.

It wasn't Barbaro's injury that decided his fate, it was the laminitis in his other feet. Let's not forget that this was a horse who had 24/7 vet care, and they still couldn't save him. This mare doesn't have 1/100th the medical attention Barbaro did.

Unfortunately, I predict the same thing will happen here. Even if the mare starts to grow her hoof back, displacing her weight onto her 3 remaining good feet is just laminitis waiting to happen.

Evans, I'm sorry. I know you're doing all you can for this girl, but I just don't think in the end it's going to be enough. Your vets sound like buffoons.
     
    06-02-2010, 05:37 PM
  #27
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelWithoutWings54    
I hope I'm not to late in posting this comment... I didn't read all the other so I don't know if she's been put down already...

When Barbaro the racehorse broke his leg, they put him on a thing that wrapped around his stomach and lifted him up off the ground. It made it so that he didn't have to put any weight on his leg, so that it could recover. I don't know if this would help with the horse's hoof, but its worth a shot.

I say that you should really try and give her a chance, but if all else fails, put her down.

Yes, this is indeed a solution. We had a mare with a broken humerus that we treated in this way. And that mare was fine in the end. But I don't know if it's ok for this one because of her shoulder wound. I'm worried about the harness that will lift her up. It is possible that the harness will touch the open wound from the shoulder and this will be very painful for her. Of it can put pressure on the wound and not allowing it to heal.

I will really consider this alternative but I guess that it will be ok to wait a little for the shoulder wound to heal a bit.
     
    06-02-2010, 05:51 PM
  #28
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lis    
I'd have had her put down immediately. I know the vet said the hoof wall will grow back but it's going to take a long time and I doubt she will ever be sound again. I would also imagine she is in a lot of pain. I think it would be kinder to have her put down.
Exactly what I was going to say. It's inhumane to keep her alive in that condition. It can take up to 12 months for a whole new hoof wall to grow back, plus she's missing the sole of her foot.
     
    06-02-2010, 05:54 PM
  #29
Weanling
riccil0ve : She's alternating the laying down with standing up so she's pretty smart the poor girl. She's laying down often but for short periods of time. And here we don't have paper bedding. I heard about it but in my area, or country, it's not used at all. We use only shavings and straw. Now we are thinking to make the bedding with straw.

Speed Racer : I'm glad that I don't have a horse. If I will buy a horse I will change the country too. I really hate those doctors. Really appreciate your opinions. And I know that you're right. You and I and almost all the people that answered to this thread are sharing the same opinion, to put the poor thing to sleep. But I can't force that woman to take the decision.

Thank you all.
     
    06-02-2010, 06:47 PM
  #30
Banned
I'm going to apologize for not reading all the preceeding posts. Three points I'd like to make:

1.) I completely support and agree with all the posters who believe it's the kindest thing to put her down. However:

2) I have seen a rescue horse in worse body condition and with worse wounds (except the hoof) recover and live a useful life. I will tell that story if anyone's interested. I seriously questioned the decision to try to save her when she came into the clinic.

3.) I have seen a horse tear off it's entire outer hoof by getting it caught it a woven wire fence and panicking. There was enough of the coronet band intact for the hoof wall to regrow, with intensive nursing care, for the horse to return to pasture soundness.

It's not the wrong decision to put her down.

It may not be the wrong decision to try to save her. I would be guided by the vet's opinions at this point.

The fact that your questioning whether it makes sense to try to save her means you're thinking with your head, not your heart, and means that you're *exactly* the right person to be working in this situation.

Brava!
     

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