Really thin TB - Page 7 - The Horse Forum
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post #61 of 66 Old 12-01-2009, 09:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starlinestables View Post
This is false. Look at the horse's digestive system.. There is a reason a horse CAN (not shouldn't) eat a bag of feed in one sitting. The stomach doesn't get full its the hind gut. Do you really think even 5 lbs (not saying you should feed 5lbs in one sitting either) of unsoaked beet pulp is going to make a difference?
Huh?? Don't really follow what you're trying to say here, but it sounds like you're disregarding the idea of feed swelling & causing problems. What *it sounds to me you're saying*(note I'm not entirely sure) is definitely incorrect. Not only can large meals of anything, let alone things fed dry that may swell, let alone full bags(!), cause serious digestive upsets, but the stomach & intestines can definitely rupture from swelling feed. Sadly I know this from first hand experience, not with beet pulp, but wheat.

Worked on a farm once where they kept a bag of wheat for the chooks in the horse's tack room. One night a tricky mini horse broke in & got into the wheat. Worked out later that he'd only eaten about 1kg(2 pounds?), but that was enough. We found him dead the next morning. The (rich) owners decided to get an autopsy done & his stomach & hindgut were both ruptured from the expanding grain.
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post #62 of 66 Old 12-02-2009, 12:58 PM
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Loosie, any type of feed that a horse gorges himself on can cause problems. However, beet pulp has been PROVEN, by vet school studies, NOT to swell in a horse's stomach or esophagus when fed dry. In a few different studies, horses were fed up to 50% of their daily forage intake with beet pulp in its two different forms, pelleted and shredded, DRY and NONE of the horses had any signs of colic or digestive upset.

A horse's stomache can hold approximately 5-7 lbs of hard feed at any one time (10 qts, I think). It only takes 15-20 minutes for that food to be processed out of the stomach.

Now, if the horse bolts his feed down or can't/won't chew properly, then choke can be a concern. But, choke would be a concern with ANY kind of hard feed (grain, pellets, textured) or hay cubes.

Feeding beet pulp wet or dry, for most horses, is simply personal preference for the owner and the horse. Some horses prefer it wet, some prefer it dry. Some owners don't want to risk choke or need it wet to mix in supplements. Some prefer the ease of mixing it dry in to other grains or feeds. It's all up to the owner to choose, wet or dry.
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post #63 of 66 Old 12-02-2009, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by loosie View Post
The (rich) owners decided to get an autopsy done & his stomach & hindgut were both ruptured from the expanding grain.
It's much more likely that the grain didn't expand and cause rupture, the pony simply ate too much and his stomach ruptured. After it ruptured, the grain soaked up blood and other bodily fluids, expanding post mortem or as he died.
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post #64 of 66 Old 12-02-2009, 07:03 PM
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Originally Posted by luvs2ride1979 View Post
Loosie, any type of feed that a horse gorges himself on can cause problems. However, beet pulp has been PROVEN, by vet school studies, NOT to swell in a horse's stomach or esophagus when fed dry.
OK, didn't know that. I know little about beet pulp. Was responding to what *I thought* was being said only.

Quote:
It's much more likely that the grain didn't expand and cause rupture, the pony simply ate too much and his stomach ruptured. After it ruptured, the grain soaked up blood and other bodily fluids, expanding post mortem or as he died.
I was just telling what the vets told us as fact. Mind you, should know better than to state it as fact myself... just because an 'expert' asserts something.... Interested to know why you think it wasn't likely the case tho?
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post #65 of 66 Old 12-02-2009, 07:24 PM
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I would be very wary of giving the horse too much weight gain feed too quickly. It could cause laminitis and digestive issues. I would follow the advice of good hay and some type of feed supplement. (beet pulp or something else like that) I hope that he gets better soon. :) You may be able to find some kind of supplement to help him get his hair back more quickly. Good Luck, adn I'm glad you got him.
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post #66 of 66 Old 12-02-2009, 07:41 PM
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Gosh I will keep him in my thoughts!!
I hope he'll be fine for winter :(
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