Retirement
 
 

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Retirement

This is a discussion on Retirement within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Hock lame retire?
  • Horse tendon injury retirement

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    12-10-2011, 11:19 PM
  #1
Foal
Exclamation Retirement

Hey guys,
In september I was riding a horse that my coach owns and we took a sharp corner (jumpers) and she tripped. At first we thought she broke her leg but after looking at it we came to the conclusion it wasnt broken. She could put weight on it. So in the last months she has been on stall rest and just lazing around the feild. My coach does not have the time to care for her and wait for her to be sound so she has given her to me. Im just writing this quickly cause im just doing some research and stuff, but she either has a pulled tendon or ligament? I really am not in the mind set to remember which. But she is swollen on the side of her knee? .... with this information can anyone give me advice on recovery or what I can do to sooth it? (ie, supplements, formulas, etc.) if she is not back on her feet by spring I will breed her because she has amazinggggggggg conformation and a personalty to die for. But for the time being what can I do?
     
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    12-10-2011, 11:25 PM
  #2
Trained
First off, PLEASE get your vet out there to answer the questions you have. A forum is only going to do so much for you. Leg injuries are very serious. I've seen mares not even sound for breeding because of a leg injury and not being able to support the extra weight.

Also, are you breeding just because you want a "Piece" of this mare? Do you have registration papers on this mare? Have you researched into her bloodlines? Do you have the money and the facilities to keep the foal? I don't mean to hound on you but SO many people breed for all the wrong reasons.
     
    12-10-2011, 11:34 PM
  #3
Banned
Why has she not seen a vet yet for a three-month old injury? She should have been examined and treated immediately. If you can't give her the bare necessities like that, you have zero business even thinking about breeding.
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    12-10-2011, 11:37 PM
  #4
Showing
Agree with Sorrelhorse, a vet would be able to give you a mostly definitive prognosis. Depending on the exact location of the injury, the severity, and which tendons/ligaments are involved, she may end up perfectly sound with extended rest or she may be lame for the remainder of her life, unsound for breeding, and suitable only as a companion/pasture puff.
     
    12-12-2011, 06:24 AM
  #5
Yearling
Please call a vet! There could be countless issues. I'm surprise your coach didn't call the vet when it happened. From the sounds of it I'd call a vet get it scanned and work out what's wrong.
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    12-12-2011, 07:31 AM
  #6
Green Broke
I agree with the above advice. Also, your coach gave her to you so she wouldn't be stuck with a horse that can't make her money. She wasn't doing you a favor, she was doing herself a favor. The very least your coach could have done is get a diagnosis.
I hope things work out well for you & the mare.
     
    12-12-2011, 07:52 AM
  #7
Trained
Unfortunately if there is a substantial injury there, you're chances of treating it and returning her to full soundness is quite slim even with a vet on board to help, because of how long it was left. If the injury was bad enough for you to think she'd broken her leg, I am shocked that a vet was not called on the day. The faster an injury is treated, the better the chance of recovery.

Don't ask on a horse forum, call your vet. Yesterday!
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    12-12-2011, 07:58 AM
  #8
Green Broke
I'm sorry.. did I read the OP post correct? A horse with possible break, then possible tendon/ligament injury has been holed up in a stable for three months, and because the owner/coach can't be bothered, she's passed the walking (or not so) vets bill on to a student?

JEEBLES.
A) I'd run from that barn
B) CALL THE BLINKING VET. All sorts of things could have happened. Treat your animals how you would treat yourselves.
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    12-12-2011, 08:04 AM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuffyDuck    
I'm sorry.. did I read the OP post correct? A horse with possible break, then possible tendon/ligament injury has been holed up in a stable for three months, and because the owner/coach can't be bothered, she's passed the walking (or not so) on to a student?

JEEBLES.
A) I'd run from that barn
B) CALL THE BLINKING VET. All sorts of things could have happened. Treat your animals how you would treat yourselves.
This does frustrate me, sorry OP, it was the coaches responsibility to call the vet in the first instance, not yours, so I'm not aiming this at you.
But I have just spent probably close to AU$10 000 in the last 18 months, trying to get my thoroughbred sound after a hock injury. He has very nearly been put down on a number of occasions, but I've pushed through, tried more treatments, and FINALLY his hock has stabilised enough to start light work again.
And this was a degenerative injury, not acute like this mares. I was told initially that he was just being a typical tb not wanting to work, because no body could see any lameness, but I could feel that he wasn't right, and sure enough, xrays showed an issue with his hock.
     
    12-12-2011, 08:09 AM
  #10
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
This does frustrate me, sorry OP, it was the coaches responsibility to call the vet in the first instance, not yours, so I'm not aiming this at you.
But I have just spent probably close to AU$10 000 in the last 18 months, trying to get my thoroughbred sound after a hock injury. He has very nearly been put down on a number of occasions, but I've pushed through, tried more treatments, and FINALLY his hock has stabilised enough to start light work again.
And this was a degenerative injury, not acute like this mares. I was told initially that he was just being a typical tb not wanting to work, because no body could see any lameness, but I could feel that he wasn't right, and sure enough, xrays showed an issue with his hock.
Sorry, my original post sounds awful but I am in shock. OP this horse is not your responsobility. If the owner refuses to get a vet out, I would walk away because in the long run unless the horse comes sounds (unlikely if its as bad as it sounds) or can't happily become a pasture ornament, it doesn't look pretty. If the owner, however, tries to blame you as you were the rider, run run and run. Its not your fault, these things happen. The coach should have the knowledge to sort this horse out with the care it needs.
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health, leg injury, supplement, vet

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