"Ride 'em and Bute 'em"? - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 51 Old 09-21-2012, 08:06 PM Thread Starter
Yearling
 
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"Ride 'em and Bute 'em"?

I was at the barn today spending time with my poor gelding who is on stall rest right now healing a minor injury to his leg (got kicked). I was talking to the BM about how I was itching to ride as it's been almost a week since the vet put him on stall rest. She started saying I should "just ride him. He'll be fine. Just ride 'em and bute 'em." I haven't been riding him because he's obviously in pain. He has a ginormous limp.

She went on to tell me that one of her horses is basically unrideable but she rides him when she feels like and just butes him after.

I mean, I'd rather just let him finish healing than possibly prolong his healing time by not letting him rest it. I guess my question is (Disclaimer: I am NOT going to ride him until the vet okays it and he is fully healed) would doing this potentially harm a horse in the long run? Is it even healthy to give a horse bute on a regular basis?

One man's wrong lead is another man's counter canter.
"Adjust Your Pleasure"
2006 Medicine Hat Paint Gelding
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post #2 of 51 Old 09-21-2012, 08:11 PM
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Using Bute for an extended period of time can be very hard on their stomachs. Listen to your gut; don't push her before she's healed. Bute does have a time and place in alleviating soreness and other pains and acting as an anti-imflammatory, but it should not be used to minimize healing time.
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post #3 of 51 Old 09-21-2012, 09:05 PM
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Oh yeah, just bute him up & ride him anyway - who cares, you can throw him away & get a new one when he's too 'broken'. Yup, listen to your gut, not this obviously uncaring BO!
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post #4 of 51 Old 09-21-2012, 11:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShannonSevenfold View Post
would doing this potentially harm a horse in the long run? Is it even healthy to give a horse bute on a regular basis?
Blimey yes! It's like going out for as run with a sprained ankle. Not only will the ankle get worse, but because the ankle's not supporting the rest of the leg as it should, the runner will imitate possible damage his knee as well.

The BO in question is showing a quite astonishing lack of intelligence and compassion.



The only time when I have known horses buted and ridden is really when an aged horse has arthritis that is relieved by excise, and the pain relieved by bute. But that should only be done with the support of a vet.

Get up, get going, seize the day. Enjoy the sunshine, the rain, cloudy days, snowstorms, and thunder. Getting on your horse is always worth the effort.
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post #5 of 51 Old 09-22-2012, 12:02 AM
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Originally Posted by ShannonSevenfold View Post
She went on to tell me that one of her horses is basically unrideable but she rides him when she feels like and just butes him after.
There is probably a reason that horse is unrideable... she rode him and the buted him.... She probably made him lame by doing this bc his body never got to heal injuries properly. I hate even riding mine right after a hoof trim. They seem to be alittle tender footed for a few days. So I'd rather not ride them, if they can't enjoy the ride also...
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post #6 of 51 Old 09-22-2012, 12:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Wheatermay View Post
I hate even riding mine right after a hoof trim. They seem to be alittle tender footed for a few days. So I'd rather not ride them, if they can't enjoy the ride also...
If your horses are commonly tender after a trim, something's not right. Most commonly is farrier error - paring sole or frog, inappropriate trim for the environment, etc - but can also be a symptom of 'low grade' laminitis or such. If your horse isn't the same or better immediately after a trim, definitely worth looking into it further.
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post #7 of 51 Old 09-22-2012, 12:33 AM
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Originally Posted by loosie View Post
If your horses are commonly tender after a trim, something's not right. Most commonly is farrier error - paring sole or frog, inappropriate trim for the environment, etc - but can also be a symptom of 'low grade' laminitis or such. If your horse isn't the same or better immediately after a trim, definitely worth looking into it further.
Not really ouchy, but they are tip toeing on gravel and such (they are barefoot). They have VERY healthy feet actually. I just spoil them like that I guess, lol... I have a experienced journeyman do their feet. My mare is actually the one who does it, and she complains about everything, hah!

Angels are people who can see and feel the pain in all creatures... -myself
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post #8 of 51 Old 09-22-2012, 02:56 AM
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Again, Wheat, if they're more sensitive after a trim, something's not right. If they generally 'tip toe' on gravel, I'd boot them on rough going - sounds like heel pain, so may be nothing to do with farriery per se, unless he routinely pares the frogs - many do.
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post #9 of 51 Old 09-22-2012, 11:48 PM
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Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Again, Wheat, if they're more sensitive after a trim, something's not right. If they generally 'tip toe' on gravel, I'd boot them on rough going - sounds like heel pain, so may be nothing to do with farriery per se, unless he routinely pares the frogs - many do.
First, you used my actual nickname, hehe! :) And Second, my first farrier did trim the frogs, every time. My new farrier does not.Both are journeyman, but I had the first one ever since I got my horses and they are 4 yrs old now. I just got the new farrier this spring. And now that you mention that, my gelding didnt limp on the gravel after the new farrier trimmed him and left the frogs. He is pigeon toed on his backs. Do I need to have something else done? Should I get boots? Or is the new farrier taking care of the problem now? I'll message you if you don't reply, lol! Thanks for persisting! :)

Angels are people who can see and feel the pain in all creatures... -myself
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post #10 of 51 Old 09-22-2012, 11:52 PM
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Sorry for hijacking the thread!

Angels are people who can see and feel the pain in all creatures... -myself
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