Saddling in minus 20 degree Weather??? - Page 3
 
 

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Saddling in minus 20 degree Weather???

This is a discussion on Saddling in minus 20 degree Weather??? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • What to wear in weather under minus 28 degree
  • What to wear when it's minus 30 degrees

 
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    01-30-2010, 04:58 PM
  #21
Yearling
Jeez! A cold metal bit will not hurt your horse! Stick your hand in your mouth its pretty warm!! Lack of commen sense I tell ya.
Anyways I don't ride if its colder than -15 and dropping. Otherwise I bundle up and suck it up! Lol honestly I always have hot chocolate with me.
     
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    01-30-2010, 05:36 PM
  #22
Foal
RiosDad,
You loose the greatest amount of warmth through your head in winter. I wear a balaclava (sometimes two) of some type to keep the heat in me. I use a larger helmet over the layers. It leaves more heat for the fingers. They come in both polypropylene and polartec. I have also tried a neoprene face mask, but it didn't seal the air in on the back of my neck.

I wear pantyhose under the polartec britches, under wind pants. You'll look lovely in pantyhose!! Seriously, they make men's polypropylene tights for skiers. Multiple thin layers are better than one heavy layer. Even if your feet aren't cold, less heat loss will keep your fingers warmer.

Try a chemical heat pack inside your gloves, over the back of your hand. Same for the toes. I don't own them, but the hunters use electric socks.

I find that I have to pull off the gloves to get the tack undone. That's the worst part. I don't have the luxury of a heated barn.
     
    01-30-2010, 06:10 PM
  #23
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacabreMikolaj    
To be honest? I deal with the freezing. For the most part, my fingers are nimble and my leather supple enough that I can get away with wearing little gloves just for tacking up if it's hovering around -20 with the windchill. Once it hits -40 and lower with the windchill, we essentially are forced to ride bareback. The leather freezes, you can't work with it, and even if you DO get your horse tacked up, it's a 10 minute ride because your legs are numb within minutes.

The cold, for the most part, honestly does not bother us. I very rarely get cold hands and feet to begin with - if I have to tack up a horse in bitter weather, I slip my gloves off for a minute, work quickly to get something done up, and then put my mitts back on for a minute. It sucks, but within a minute my fingers are warm and I'm ready to do something else up.

Compared to MacabreMikolaj I live in the tropics. While her and I live in Canada I am much further south and alot warmer. My son in law comes from Alberta and my daughter for the first time went home with him at christmas. She learned the true meaning of winter

MacabreMikolaj my hat is off to you for riding in that weather. I am tough but I don't know about riding in your extremes.
     
    01-30-2010, 06:13 PM
  #24
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry Godden    
I think I'll stay here. Sounds a trifle nippy over your part of the globe to me.

B G
It is not pronounced NIPPY. We call it NIPPILEY
     
    01-30-2010, 06:13 PM
  #25
Started
Riosdad, I kneel in awe at your toleration of the cold.

I'm a wuss and a worrywart about winter riding, anything under 20 F is less than pleasant for me. By the time I get chores done, my fingers and toes are too numb to do much else. I don't have the luxury of a heated barn, either, only the heat that 2 horses, 8 cats, and a dozen chickens put off. We have terrible footing... the arena is a sheet of ice under slick snow. I worry about trail riding with much snow, since we have a major and recurrent groundhog problem, and the holes are hard enough to spot in the summer. Yes, I am a wimp. Yes, I chronically make excuses about riding in the winter. They say the first step to recovery is admitting the problem.

Gloves... My hands are tiny, so I end up buying children's size camo hunting gloves; the ones with the cutoff fingers and the pocket that covers like a mitten and velcro's back out of the way. Anything bigger than kid's sizes are more cumbersome than the cold is. If I need any dexterity at all, I lose the gloves, and when I'm done I stick each hand backward into the opposite cuff to warm them, and then put the gloves back on.

When I took regular lessons, they took place in an indoor arena where footing was not an issue, but they were canceled for anything under 20 F.
     
    01-30-2010, 06:19 PM
  #26
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by horsegirlmaddy    
Also, when I ride outside in the winter, I ride bareback to keep toasty warm. It greatly improves your core strength and balance, and there is no way you can be riding bareback and get cold!
Winter and the snowmobile trails are the time to travel fast and far. The trails are groomed, about 10 feet wide and perfect footing although they do get icey but I am properly shod for ice so I don't slow down for frozen ponds or anything.
I have run with the blanket on and just put the saddle over it but not very often.
I do not walk alot, too cold and boring but I do travel with this young guy at a steady working trot. I don't beleive anyone could run with me bareback. NO ONE could keep a steady trot for a couple of hours or even a hour bareback, uphill , downhill, just a steady ground eating trot.
     
    01-30-2010, 06:21 PM
  #27
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tasia    
I always have hot chocolate with me.

Funny but when I come in out of the cold I eat ice cream, a bowl of cold ice cream.. When I was scuba diving and got really cold ice cream was what I craved?? Go figure??
     
    01-30-2010, 06:23 PM
  #28
Green Broke
Metal conducts cold. This why kids tongues get stuck to the playground in the winter.
     
    01-30-2010, 06:24 PM
  #29
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tasia    
Jeez! A cold metal bit will not hurt your horse! Stick your hand in your mouth its pretty warm!! Lack of commen sense I tell ya.
Anyways I don't ride if its colder than -15 and dropping. Otherwise I bundle up and suck it up! Lol honestly I always have hot chocolate with me.
How about if you take a piece of metal that is -20 degrees and stick it in your warm mouth and report back how it went.
     
    01-30-2010, 06:29 PM
  #30
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by EPMhorse    
RiosDad,
You loose the greatest amount of warmth through your head in winter. I wear a balaclava (sometimes two) of some type to keep the heat in me. I use a larger helmet over the layers. It leaves more heat for the fingers. They come in both polypropylene and polartec. I have also tried a neoprene face mask, but it didn't seal the air in on the back of my neck.

I wear pantyhose under the polartec britches, under wind pants. You'll look lovely in pantyhose!! Seriously, they make men's polypropylene tights for skiers. Multiple thin layers are better than one heavy layer. Even if your feet aren't cold, less heat loss will keep your fingers warmer.

Try a chemical heat pack inside your gloves, over the back of your hand. Same for the toes. I don't own them, but the hunters use electric socks.

I find that I have to pull off the gloves to get the tack undone. That's the worst part. I don't have the luxury of a heated barn.

I agree with the warm hat. I ride in what looks like a skin cap covering my head, my ears, my throat and it is really warm. I also wear a total rubber face shield, only my eyes are visible.
Chaps, heavy leather chaps over 3 layers of pants keep my legs toasty,

I have the dress down for any weather and seldom feel the cold.
The post was about those that tack up outside in the cold?? My barn is 30 or better even in this weather and that is where I tack up. In the warm barn so to speak. I put everything on before exiting the barn and again I am toasty and tomorrow I hope to make it alot longer then a 2 or 3 hour ride. I intend to head north until I am sick of riding and then swing south and home. Against my GPS I have found myself on my old guy making a 20-25 mile run over the trails. My young guy working at a easy working trot will cover 15 or so miles like today.
He is 4 and I don't want to stress him to much. I like him and hope to get 30 or 40,000 miles out of him.
I do run a log book on all my horses as to distance , place and anything unusual. My old guy has over 30,000 miles in his log.
     

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