Is this the same as kissing spine?
 
 

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Is this the same as kissing spine?

This is a discussion on Is this the same as kissing spine? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Kissing spine in tb horses
  • What are the long term and short term implications of kissing spine in orses

 
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    11-03-2009, 09:04 AM
  #1
Yearling
Is this the same as kissing spine?

I'm looking at a 14 y.o. TB gelding that has some back problems. The owner's email is below. The closest thing I could find to what she's describing is Kissing Spine. Is that what this is? How major of a problem could this be? I plan on riding in lessons, going for an occasional trail ride, learning some dressage, and doing small courses (up to 2'-2'6") with him. Maybe some shows just for fun next year and I might want to let my trainer use him for beginner / intermediate lessons. Should I be concerned about long term problems?

Owner's Email:

The xrays show that he lost some of the cushioning between his 16 and 17 vertebrae (mostlikely from heavy duty jumping) causing the vertebrae to pinch when he arches his back (jumps) however I put him on bute when I am working him hard. However I am jumping him at 3'-3'9 and that's whats going to put the biggest strain on his back, if he was jumping smaller than there would be almost no problem at all however I do the big jumpers. I put him on bute when I am working him hard (show season). We do give him ACE just in case of any pain he may have while having his
Hind legs done, but he does fine with our farrier because he holds winston's hind legs low so it doesn't wear out his back (it's mostly that winstongets tired of holding his hind legs up so high). Other than that there are no lamneness issues. I am not to fimiliar with dressage but the vet told me that flat work won't hurt him. I would ask your trainer his/her opinion on winston as far as his back and dressage is concerned because I was never involved in dressage I never asked the vet what his thoughts were on it. He really does have a great personality and he truely is the best horse I've ever owned.
     
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    11-03-2009, 09:05 AM
  #2
Yearling
And she did offer to have his medical records and x-rays available for us to look at when we come to see him.
     
    11-03-2009, 10:33 AM
  #3
Weanling
If he has a problem with his back and it is caused by jumping and jumping aggravtes it why is she still jumping, also this horse seems to be on painkillers and you wont know his personality until he is completly off them. I would really look hard at this horse before you make any decisions
     
    11-03-2009, 10:47 AM
  #4
Weanling
I'm not an expert in ANY stretch on the imagination here, and I really don't know anything about jumping, but I just have to ask....

If he's lost cushioning in his spine which causes pinching when he is jumping, then I'm thinking jumping would be a no go, right? And if you have to give him bute to keep the pain at bay now...then it will only get worse later on & the more you jump him, right? How serious is this kind of injury & will it get worse the more he's jumped?

I'm not wanting to get yelled at by members here, I'm curious. I want to know. If you are looking to buy a horse to jump with & use they way you want to, then why would you be looking at a horse that already has back problems and needs pain medication to jump now? Or, if it's something that is ok and can be worked with. And...what is "kissing spine"?
     
    11-03-2009, 11:02 AM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamer1215    
I'm not an expert in ANY stretch on the imagination here, and I really don't know anything about jumping, but I just have to ask....

If he's lost cushioning in his spine which causes pinching when he is jumping, then I'm thinking jumping would be a no go, right? And if you have to give him bute to keep the pain at bay now...then it will only get worse later on & the more you jump him, right? How serious is this kind of injury & will it get worse the more he's jumped?
This is exactly my line of thinking. She's giving me the impression that her vet doesn't think its a big deal and can be easily managed, but my first thought was that he shouldn't be doing anything that puts more stress on his back. He's an amazing horse that's been around the local show circuit but I am NOT a fan of medicating to cover up pain. However, I don't want to pass him up if it really isn't something serious that is easily manageable. I have no intention of jumping him the was she has been, but I don't want to have a horse that shouldn't be jumped at all, or may be in discomfort learning to bend, lunge, or use his back in LL dressage.
     
    11-03-2009, 11:06 AM
  #6
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvmyperch    
I'm looking at a 14 y.o. TB gelding that has some back problems. The owner's email is below. The closest thing I could find to what she's describing is Kissing Spine. Is that what this is? How major of a problem could this be? I plan on riding in lessons, going for an occasional trail ride, learning some dressage, and doing small courses (up to 2'-2'6") with him. Maybe some shows just for fun next year and I might want to let my trainer use him for beginner / intermediate lessons. Should I be concerned about long term problems?
Absolutely. This is a horse that I would stop jumping for quite a while and especially at 3.9. I would also talk to a vet about short and long term prognosis. He will probably be a horse that I suspect will develop (if he hasn't developed it already) severe arthritis.

Kissing spine: Symptoms and treatment of a horse with Kissing Spines

However, depending on the severity of the problem, he may just come around. I would want MY vet to determine the extent, not theirs.
     
    11-03-2009, 11:09 AM
  #7
Weanling
Its just my opinion, but I would pass.
     
    11-03-2009, 11:17 AM
  #8
Started
Have to agree. You don't even know if he's ok on the flat, if he's been medicated soo long. You have to think about side effects of constant buting- like ulcers. My mare has navicular, I've had a vet tell me I can keep jumping if I bute her, but otherwise she would be in alot of pain (even on the flat). Bute is great at masking problems, but dosent seem like she's really doing anything to try and fix him. Talk to her about preventative measures she's taking. Making a horse uphill, because you are making his back feet short is not a good answer.
     
    11-03-2009, 11:17 AM
  #9
Yearling
This is not exactly the same as kissing spine, but it can cause the same type of pain because it can put pressure on or pinch the spinal cord. This is a horse that needs to have a thorough pre-purchase exam if you are going to consider him seriously for a dressage horse because EVERY MOVEMENT affects the back. Rather than just accepting what this owner is saying, I would ask for a copy of x-rays and medical records to be sent over for review by your own vet.
     
    11-03-2009, 11:23 AM
  #10
Yearling
The more I think about this, it's not something I really want to deal with. Too many what ifs and maybes on this one. Even if the vet says its ok now, I have a hard time thinking that its something that isn't going to progress into more serious problems. There are plenty of others out there!
     

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