Scary Dentist Experience
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Scary Dentist Experience

This is a discussion on Scary Dentist Experience within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Do cribbing collars cut off carotid
  • My horse had a terrible dentist experience how do i help him

Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By franknbeans

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    10-15-2012, 02:49 PM
  #1
Weanling
Scary Dentist Experience

Today, my gelding (15yo) had to get his teeth done. We decided to try a different person because the guy we were using before automatically sedates the horse. Since Ash is getting older, we wanted to try with out sedation.
Since I was at school, I'm not sure exactly what happened, but I guess the dentist didn't take the cribbing collar off Ash before he started his teeth. The collar was cutting of his breathing and my horse had a little panic attack. He completely stopped breathing and fainted. The took off his cribing collar and called the vet. I guess he was only out for a second, but he took a huge breath when the collar came off. Thankfully, my horse was in his stall, so there was lots of bedding to cushion him, but the chiro is coming out tomorrow to do him and my other horse. The vet said he was fine. He didn't hurt himself when he fell. I don't really like to put a cribbing collar on any ways, but we have to at the place we board. It wasn't as tight as it could go, so the dentist must've had his head at a wierd angle. I feel so bad for my horse, and I will definitely be there the next time he gets his teeth done (6 months from now)
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    10-15-2012, 02:54 PM
  #2
Yearling
So glad your horse is ok. Yet another reason I don't like using non-veterinary dentists. First of all, when using someone who sedates but is not a vet they are using the drugs ILLEGALLY and likely won't have the supplies or knowledge of what to do if there is a reaction or medical emergency. Second, I doubt it was the breathing that was cut off by the collar. THough we call it "choke" it was more likely the arterial supply to the brain. This same thing happens when cattle go down in a shoot and cut off the carotid artery supply and it is an emergency situation. Apparently it is kind of a fad for teenagers to do too, they hang upside down then stand up fast and have someone hold their hands against their neck and they get a cheap high. Very dangerous and stupid. Again, so glad your horse is ok and the chiro will be out to make sure he didn't throw anything out during the fall.
     
    10-15-2012, 03:17 PM
  #3
Weanling
So if the collar didn't cut off the air, are you saying that he wasn't getting enough blood to the brain? Sorry, I don't understand. I know cribbing makes him "high" and that;s why he wont stop, but are you saying he held his breath to get high? And the last dentist was a vet, but he wouldn't do the teeth w/o drugs because of the risk of injury or something like that.
     
    10-15-2012, 03:21 PM
  #4
Foal
Wow! So glad your horse is okay!
     
    10-15-2012, 05:35 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashsunnyeventer    
So if the collar didn't cut off the air, are you saying that he wasn't getting enough blood to the brain? Sorry, I don't understand. I know cribbing makes him "high" and that;s why he wont stop, but are you saying he held his breath to get high? And the last dentist was a vet, but he wouldn't do the teeth w/o drugs because of the risk of injury or something like that.
I'm saying if the cribbing collar caused him to pass out, it was more likely due to it cutting off the blood supply to the brain (which is through the carotid artery which runs up the neck on both sides right next to the jugular vein) rather than it cutting off his air supply. And yes we do think cribbing gives them a "high" but that is unrelated to what I was talking about. I just meant the collar might have cut off the blood supply, depending on how the dentist had the head positioned, etc not that your horse was holding his breath.

I have to say, I am 100% for sedation during dentistry. I have had patients that rear up when they are unsedated or too lightly sedated. It is risky for the vet, our staff, and very importantly for the horse as well! The drugs we use are very safe and fairly short acting. When you weigh the risks of having accidents vs the risks of the drugs, drugs win!
     
    10-15-2012, 06:37 PM
  #6
Green Broke
I'm also 100% for having a vet do dentistry, especially one who's specialized in that area. I have my regular vet whose office is right around the corner and boards her horses at my stable, but for dentals, I call out another vet who has specialized in dentistry (and acupuncture and saddle fitting!)
     
    10-15-2012, 07:04 PM
  #7
Weanling
The man who did my horses teeth was a "Specialized Equine Dentist" The whole barn uses him, so we thought we could just get on their schedule to make it easier. As my horse is getting older, I don't want him sedated EVERY time, especially if he doesn't need it. The vets around here just go through the whole barn and sedate every horse, then go back and do their teeth.
     
    10-15-2012, 07:16 PM
  #8
Foal
We use this on our mare but it is attached to an old halter with bailing twine because it is too big with the clips on it.

Vinyl Coated Bar Cribbing Muzzle - Horse.com

This would probobly be lighter and easier though

Economy Grazing Muzzle with Halter - Horse.com
     
    10-15-2012, 07:22 PM
  #9
Weanling
We tried a muzzle, but he isn't an easy keeper and he lost so much weight. It's hard for him to eat out of a bucket in the stall with a muzzle and his friends in the field would probably pull it off. We had to put tobasco sauce on the strap of his collar so they would stop chewing it! Thanks for the suggestion though. If he could keep weight, we would definitely try that again.
     
    10-15-2012, 07:44 PM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by tealamutt    
I'm saying if the cribbing collar caused him to pass out, it was more likely due to it cutting off the blood supply to the brain (which is through the carotid artery which runs up the neck on both sides right next to the jugular vein) rather than it cutting off his air supply. And yes we do think cribbing gives them a "high" but that is unrelated to what I was talking about. I just meant the collar might have cut off the blood supply, depending on how the dentist had the head positioned, etc not that your horse was holding his breath.

I have to say, I am 100% for sedation during dentistry. I have had patients that rear up when they are unsedated or too lightly sedated. It is risky for the vet, our staff, and very importantly for the horse as well! The drugs we use are very safe and fairly short acting. When you weigh the risks of having accidents vs the risks of the drugs, drugs win!

I have a wonderful dentist who never uses sedation, and it is fabulous. I do not know of one in MD.....the one I use is in NY.

Anyway-I have had a horse pass out-almost seizure like activity because he stretched in a wierd way exiting his stall one day with his cribbing collar on. Had him totally worked up and FINALLY, Damascus Equine,In MD) who has an Internal Medicine person figured it out. Who knew. Now that I do-never again with a cribber, no less one with a collar.
Ashsunnyeventer likes this.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Scary experience with quicksand... minstrel Trail Riding 9 07-28-2012 02:30 PM
SCARY, SCARY moments at horse shows JumpersRule Horse Shows 20 04-23-2011 07:22 AM
Scary First Experience with Colic SaratogaTB Horse Health 9 07-28-2010 08:41 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0