School me on Colic. And a story of colic. - Page 3
 
 

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School me on Colic. And a story of colic.

This is a discussion on School me on Colic. And a story of colic. within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        02-16-2014, 10:47 AM
      #21
    Foal
    Anyone know if a horse can have colic WITH stomach noises?
    I looked at stop colic and it mentions the return of noises after ingestion.
    My filly has noise but is biting her stomach. Poo seems moist. I noticed a few cow kicks yesterday in her stall but nothing today..
    This is my first year with this gal so I'm still learning her norms. Think this is colic or itchies from her first winter shed?
    Any advice is welcome! Thanks!
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        02-16-2014, 11:34 AM
      #22
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by updownrider    
    Learn how to check Brisco's temperature, pulse and respiration. When you first suspect he does not feel well, check all three. Almost always when I call the vet about a sick horse, his first question is what is his temperature. At that point he may advise to medicate or to wait until he is there.
    This.
    Learn what his normal temp. And p and r are. Then you can compare if you feel that he is sick or in pain.

    Another thing..you can press your ear against his side and listen for gut sounds. If you don't hear any or can barely make them out that isn't good. Roaring gut sounds aren't good either. When you listen check both sides. Good info. To be able to give your vet when you call.

    Hope your boy is okay now.
         
        02-16-2014, 01:32 PM
      #23
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by quinn    
    Anyone know if a horse can have colic WITH stomach noises?
    I looked at stop colic and it mentions the return of noises after ingestion.
    My filly has noise but is biting her stomach. Poo seems moist. I noticed a few cow kicks yesterday in her stall but nothing today..
    This is my first year with this gal so I'm still learning her norms. Think this is colic or itchies from her first winter shed?
    Any advice is welcome! Thanks!
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Absolutely. There are so many different types of colic and the absence of gut sounds is only one indicator. Both times my boy coliced there were still gut sounds. The trick is learning what regular gut sounds are like. I like to compare them to the sound of a wash machine on gentle (as normal) and harsh churning/ roaring (similar to us when we are hungry and stomach growling) is not good.

    Each horse is different though. That's why on top of the vitals I also check gut sounds to have an idea of what the norm for that horse is.
         
        02-16-2014, 01:36 PM
      #24
    Yearling
    Also, what's other people's stance on walking a horse that is colicing? From a young age I was always taught to walk the horse, but over the years I have encountered four very seasoned wonderful vets that all said similar things- if the horse is standing in a comfy way- don't bug em. They said that the walking could be helpful in certain colic instances, but harmful in others.

    Opinions on this? I'm curious to hear others' stance.
         
        02-16-2014, 01:42 PM
      #25
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by quinn    
    Anyone know if a horse can have colic WITH stomach noises?
    I looked at stop colic and it mentions the return of noises after ingestion.
    My filly has noise but is biting her stomach. Poo seems moist. I noticed a few cow kicks yesterday in her stall but nothing today..
    This is my first year with this gal so I'm still learning her norms. Think this is colic or itchies from her first winter shed?
    Any advice is welcome! Thanks!
    Posted via Mobile Device
    I think you might be looking at ulcers and not colic.
         
        02-16-2014, 01:42 PM
      #26
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ninamebo    
    Also, what's other people's stance on walking a horse that is colicing? From a young age I was always taught to walk the horse, but over the years I have encountered four very seasoned wonderful vets that all said similar things- if the horse is standing in a comfy way- don't bug em. They said that the walking could be helpful in certain colic instances, but harmful in others.

    Opinions on this? I'm curious to hear others' stance.
    Newest advice from the vet school here is to leave them alone, allow them to roll if they want, but not thrash. Walking is ok for an impaction, might get things to loosen up but no telling. Favorite colic remedy for me, load 'em in the trailer and go for a ride. Frequently that will get things moving. If you go for a ride and don't get a pile, keep on going to the vet hospital.
    acorn, Slave2Ponies and Ninamebo like this.
         
        02-16-2014, 02:00 PM
      #27
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ninamebo    
    Also, what's other people's stance on walking a horse that is colicing? From a young age I was always taught to walk the horse, but over the years I have encountered four very seasoned wonderful vets that all said similar things- if the horse is standing in a comfy way- don't bug em. They said that the walking could be helpful in certain colic instances, but harmful in others.

    Opinions on this? I'm curious to hear others' stance.
    I was curious about this too. My friends horse had colic a number of times and the BO said walk it out & he'd be fine. It kind of puzzled me they weren't more concerned especially since he had coliced 3 times in the span of just two months....

    My friend was only leasing him and started a lease on another horse so I'm not sure if he's still experiencing the same issues, rumor is he's doing fine though.

    My brothers horse had passed from colic but I wasn't there so I didn't see what it looked like. She was older, so the BO had told us to expect it sooner than later.

    Anyway, this thread is greatly appreciated! I read a lot of valuable info, thank you everyone & the OP.
         
        02-16-2014, 02:52 PM
      #28
    Yearling
    Thanks Dreamcatcher, great response. That's the reoccurring answer I've been getting lately too. Glad to hear I'm not alone in that info :)

    Yes, trailer ride has had the highest success rate in my experience. It's partially why I'm looking to invest in my own. (Second to craving trail rides in parks we can't get to on foot)

    All great things to know.
         
        02-16-2014, 03:34 PM
      #29
    Foal
    If possible I think it is good to walk the horse with colic, especially if you can't get the vet out. For one thing, the pain can come and go like spasms. It is not good to leave them alone, as they could get another bout of pain and start to thrash. I've spent a few midnight hours walking colicky horses -- couldn't get the vet and of course these things happen late Friday night. It helps them to walk and also takes their mind off the pain. All the other advice given above is good. I can attest to the fact that the older the horse, the more prone to colic. Also, I think their old intestines are more prone to getting a twist. All you can do is keep their teeth good and their diet good and watch them close. Once they have had it, chances are they will get it again. It can be incredibly painful for some, and others seem to just get a tummy ache. Colic gets a lot of horses every year. You're wise to take it seriously.
         
        02-16-2014, 04:08 PM
      #30
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Slave2Ponies    
    If possible I think it is good to walk the horse with colic, especially if you can't get the vet out. For one thing, the pain can come and go like spasms. It is not good to leave them alone, as they could get another bout of pain and start to thrash. I've spent a few midnight hours walking colicky horses -- couldn't get the vet and of course these things happen late Friday night. It helps them to walk and also takes their mind off the pain. All the other advice given above is good. I can attest to the fact that the older the horse, the more prone to colic. Also, I think their old intestines are more prone to getting a twist. All you can do is keep their teeth good and their diet good and watch them close. Once they have had it, chances are they will get it again. It can be incredibly painful for some, and others seem to just get a tummy ache. Colic gets a lot of horses every year. You're wise to take it seriously.
    When I said, leave them alone, I didn't mean ALONE. Just meant don't mess with them and let them roll or stand quiet, whatever they are comfortable doing. If I can't get a vet, then I'll give 15 cc Banamine I.V. And see how they do. If they aren't passing anything, I remove everything but water from the stall. I'm very fortunate in that I live less than 15 mins from a vet school and can always reach a vet, but I remember days with it wasn't so. I used to live in the desert in California and my vet could end up out in Needles and I'd need him in Big Bear, 4 or 5 hours drive away. Had to do a LOT on my own then.
         

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