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Seedy Toe/White Line Disease

This is a discussion on Seedy Toe/White Line Disease within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Pine tar whiteline disease
  • Pea gravel white line disease

 
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    09-07-2009, 02:31 AM
  #31
Weanling
Main thing is to have that wall beveled appropriately. I don't see a massive case of WLD. Just know that it won't get any better if the trim isn't improved.

Is your horse really unsound? Could still be an abscess that's causing the tenderness. The soaks will help. But...to much water can soften a hoof and make it sore, and abscesses will eventually pop on their own, regardless, if the hoof gets enough blood circulation. So...if you skipped soaks, I wouldn't call you a bad horse mom.

Being flat on soles does make them more sensitive. I recommend boots, truely. They are cheaper in the long run than shoes, and last quiet a while. You only have to use them when your horse is not comfortable on a surface. Also, not all "gimps" are really limping. They can feel a rock, and will shift weight before stepping down hard enough to do damage, much as if you step on a kid's toy in the dark in the hallway, you shift your weight instinctively before you actually puncture your toe. But, if your horse is doing that a lot, then she's too sensitive just yet to go bare all the time.

Hoof Hardeners don't do much good in most cases. Venice turpentine is really just a varnish that adds a thin layer of "sole" temporarily. It wears off very fast, and doesn't really harm the hoof much, as long as you don't apply to the frog. Hardeners can make the hoof so hard it becomes brittle, like metals do and more apt to break. But, waterlogged is bad, too. Hooves can maintain the moisture level just fine if not over rasped, or forced to stand in water/ poo Moisturizers can trap fungus in, and make it worse, too. Most cracks come from excess moisture and fungus that thrives in it than is ever caused by dryness. The hoof is still part of the body, and it's moiture level is supplied by blood circulation. It's designed to soften when the environment is wet, and if fungus is part of the natural process to shed excess wall that won't wear off in mud, then so be it. (but in domestic horses is a sign that the hoof needs trimming, and dry environment) Hooves get dry and hard in drought to withstand the wear level of dry, hard ground. Dryness is not evil.

Basically, I see your horse needing boots for a few months when you ride. She can be bare the rest of the time. Maybe forever, but if she was fine before, she can be again. And if it's just an abscess, once it blows out, she'll be fine, and the boots will make her happier in the meantime.
     
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    09-09-2009, 10:41 AM
  #32
Foal
angelsridewithus

Quote:
Originally Posted by barefoothooves    
Main thing is to have that wall beveled appropriately. I don't see a massive case of WLD. Just know that it won't get any better if the trim isn't improved.

Is your horse really unsound? Could still be an abscess that's causing the tenderness. The soaks will help. But...to much water can soften a hoof and make it sore, and abscesses will eventually pop on their own, regardless, if the hoof gets enough blood circulation. So...if you skipped soaks, I wouldn't call you a bad horse mom.

Being flat on soles does make them more sensitive. I recommend boots, truely. They are cheaper in the long run than shoes, and last quiet a while. You only have to use them when your horse is not comfortable on a surface. Also, not all "gimps" are really limping. They can feel a rock, and will shift weight before stepping down hard enough to do damage, much as if you step on a kid's toy in the dark in the hallway, you shift your weight instinctively before you actually puncture your toe. But, if your horse is doing that a lot, then she's too sensitive just yet to go bare all the time.

Hoof Hardeners don't do much good in most cases. Venice turpentine is really just a varnish that adds a thin layer of "sole" temporarily. It wears off very fast, and doesn't really harm the hoof much, as long as you don't apply to the frog. Hardeners can make the hoof so hard it becomes brittle, like metals do and more apt to break. But, waterlogged is bad, too. Hooves can maintain the moisture level just fine if not over rasped, or forced to stand in water/ poo Moisturizers can trap fungus in, and make it worse, too. Most cracks come from excess moisture and fungus that thrives in it than is ever caused by dryness. The hoof is still part of the body, and it's moiture level is supplied by blood circulation. It's designed to soften when the environment is wet, and if fungus is part of the natural process to shed excess wall that won't wear off in mud, then so be it. (but in domestic horses is a sign that the hoof needs trimming, and dry environment) Hooves get dry and hard in drought to withstand the wear level of dry, hard ground. Dryness is not evil.

Basically, I see your horse needing boots for a few months when you ride. She can be bare the rest of the time. Maybe forever, but if she was fine before, she can be again. And if it's just an abscess, once it blows out, she'll be fine, and the boots will make her happier in the meantime.
Hi. I've been following this discussion on seedy toe etc. because I have an older quarter horse who is pretty stiff but getting better after we discovered he had an abcess which blew out. He is probably arthritic also but such a nice ride. I keep him barefoot and he's very willing but he's very ouchy and woosey about going on anything more stoney that plain clay/sand. He's been hard to toughen up because of that. I have some pine tar and salve left over from 10 years ago when people were pretty much painting the bottoms of their horses feet. I get the impression that doing so is not that good an idea so I'm not asking for a recipe for a hoof hardener. But how can I get him tougher? Also, what are the riding boots you've mentioned? By the way his feet are excellent and he gets a great diet and gets trimmed by a barefoot trim farrier every six weeks. He did get seedy toe and the abcess when we had way too much rain for 2 months but he has grown all that bad hoof out.
     
    09-09-2009, 11:09 AM
  #33
Started
Barefoothooves doesn't get on often due to the busys and dialup so allow me to address the hoof boot question.

Hoof boots are basically shoes you can remove after use. Go to Easycare to read about some of the popular boots and their uses. I would say they would help your horse a lot for riding. You can also put an inexpensive pad inside if they still are touchy. Walmart blue exercise matting works great, just cut to fit.
     
    09-09-2009, 10:44 PM
  #34
Weanling
Boot brand doesn't matter, really. There are so many styles now, too. You can get one that fits your needs according to budget and ease of application for the amount of time you will use them.

And I'm not sure what your budget is or if you board your horse, so this may not be feasable, but you can put round gravel (it can be small river rock or pea gravel, or larger stones, just so long as they are smooth) in a high traffic area, say around the water trough, in the walk way of a gate he goes through frequently. The stones, if they aren't sharp, won't bruise him, will help toughen the feet and exfoliate the sole, and will help get rid of those muddy spots. The key is to put them a few inches deep, so they aren't hard on him, but have some give. They'll pack down and scatter over time, and if your horse has toughened by then, you may not need to top them off very often to keep them deep, unless you want to.

Personally, I have landscaping gravel along the front of the stalls of the barn, and in front of the watering hole. Cuts down on erosion, and their feet look pretty good. I have sandy, arena-like soil that wouldn't toughen any hoof at all, so I've compromised by buying rocks. I started with river gravel, several bags, mind you, from Lowes but you can probably save by having a truck load from the local gravel company put in. We later put some lava rock on top, and it's really polished up those soles!

Older horses may never be as tough if they've been shod most of their life. Depending on how the shoes were applied, and you're horses' natural sole thickness, etc. But after years of shoeing the corium can be damaged enough it just doesn't grow quite as well, period. That's when you get boots for riding and every wins. We have a 25yr old that was shod all his life, until a few years ago, and he's a tad thinner soled. I can ride on concrete with him, or hard ground, but road gravel he's very careful about, so I boot him. I use Cavallos on him-he's round footed, and he's old so we don't ride him much, so they never rub on him, but if we rode more, would use Easyboot Epics, Gloves, or Bares.

Pine Tar is a good antiseptic type for horses, so in the sole it wouldn't toughen it, really, but it would help fend off thrush.
     

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