Seeking Advice: Horse with "sore" back?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Seeking Advice: Horse with "sore" back?

This is a discussion on Seeking Advice: Horse with "sore" back? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Horse with sore back
  • Horse roach back sore

Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By Dreamcatcher Arabians

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    07-18-2012, 11:18 PM
  #1
Foal
Seeking Advice: Horse with "sore" back?

Hi, all.
After working in barns and taking lessons for about 3 years now, I have found a new instructor who has this big AQH mare that I connected with.

She rode her without issue. I (I am a plus sized rider, about 250 more take than give) (and 6'0") rode her for about an hour with no problem. I went to dismount and she made that horsey shriek and pulled away from me. It was, what we think, to be a pain noise. We poked and prodded, but she was over it after I was on the ground. She dozed off as we pressed all over her trying to figure out the problem. We got nothing.

A time after that, my instructor got on her and she seemed a bit annoyed, but did not indicate she was in pain.

Next lesson, I went to get on her again, and she was fine. We rode around just fine for a while. She suddenly stopped and acted pained whenever I gently touched her with my heels. I went to dismount, and she was all over the place, making terrible noises and acting like I was really hurting her. I got to the point where I had to get off of her as fast as possible. She turned her backside toward me, but did not kick out at me once she saw me. She just went back to being calm and dozing with her head against my shoulder.

So, there are definitely some red flags. I have never owned a horse before. I can tell you that she is a little over 10 years old. She is well over 16hh and very big built. She was received from a starvation case. She is now putting on weight, and being happy and shiny and all seems well in the world.

So, I do feel a bond with her. The instructor was saying she wanted to sell her. (It's a small price, honestly. ) but I want to have a vet come out and evaluate what might be up with her back. If I do that, I'm out the cost of the vet.

Do you think this is a behavior, or is there pain?
What does an x-ray cost?
Do you think all signs point to "pass!" on this horse?

Any and all opinions/insights/limericks helpful and appreciated! Thank you.



     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    07-19-2012, 12:13 AM
  #2
Foal
Hey BossHoss! Sorry to hear your having troubles. In my opinion she looks well and able to carry a load from looking at the picture. However she does have some slope to her back which makes me think she was either a broodmare or she hasnt had time to build back up those muscles from her being malnourished and both of these things could cause back tenderness. I had a QH who was swayback her whole adulthood because she was bred to death when she was younger and I've had a underweight QH who had no muscle in her back when we got her. I'm here to tell you both can be managed or corrected if you have the want. A visit from the chiropractor every month, water massage, and glucosamine worked wonders for my old broodmare. A good high quality food with fiber, protein and vitamins/minerals along with exercises like head tucks and pull ins helped build muscle on my skinny mini. Both continue to be riden today and have minimal pains. It's all in how much your willing to do. If in doubt call your vet or another trusted horse handler. By all means. A horse is a big commitment and you should do whatever makes you comfortable. Hope this helps!
     
    07-19-2012, 12:17 AM
  #3
Trained
Before I called the vet I'd call a chiropractor. They generally cost a lot less, do certain tests to find out where the pain response is, and then do manipulation, massage and adjustment to put the bones back where they belong (she could be out in her ribs as well as spine). My guy charges $100 for the first visit and $75 for any further visits.

After you either get her vetted or adjusted, I'd would invest in a 3 step plastic mounting block and use that to mount and dismount, don't do it from the ground anymore, it's very easy to pull her withers out of alignment from the ground, especially since you're a good sized rider. I either use my mounting steps, the tailgate of a truck, running board of a trailer, a rock, picnic table or stump or SOMETHING, never get on from the ground. I'll occasionally drop from the stirrup to the ground but since I'm only 5'2" and my mare is over 16 hands, that's a long drop so I'd rather get down onto something else too. I've hit the ground wrong and slid when landing and broke my wrist in 3 places. That pretty much cured me of the elevator drop dismount.

I don't know what she's asking for the horse but a good BASIC pre-purchase exam will generally run around $300-500 depending on how extensive the exam is, radiographs, ultrasounds, etc. Generally my rule of thumb is, if I can turn around tomorrow and resell the horse for what I have in her/him, then I skip the exam other than what I do myself. WARNING: I've been around horses for 40+ years and I still occasionally get burned anyhow. If the horse is over $5K then it's an automatic thorough exam, if I want the horse for something real strenuous (ok I don't do strenuous anymore, but like jumping, 50 miler endurance rides that kind of thing), automatic 4 legs x-rayed and ultrasounded. If I don't know the seller really well, it's a automatic minimum blood draw for narcotics too.

Since this horse is already demonstating physical issues, I would not skip the PPE period and my offer to buy would be contingent on the horse passing with a vet of YOUR chosing, not the seller's vet.
     
    07-19-2012, 12:25 AM
  #4
Foal
Yes! Thanks for reminding me.
She has had a foal as recently as 8-10 months ago, but the foal was taken away from her, as she was being starved and could not provide milk. (See also: the barely there tail! :C)

Certainly something to factor in. <3 Thanks for the input.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ponyupbb    
Hey BossHoss! Sorry to hear your having troubles. In my opinion she looks well and able to carry a load from looking at the picture. However she does have some slope to her back which makes me think she was either a broodmare or she hasnt had time to build back up those muscles from her being malnourished and both of these things could cause back tenderness. I had a QH who was swayback her whole adulthood because she was bred to death when she was younger and I've had a underweight QH who had no muscle in her back when we got her. I'm here to tell you both can be managed or corrected if you have the want. A visit from the chiropractor every month, water massage, and glucosamine worked wonders for my old broodmare. A good high quality food with fiber, protein and vitamins/minerals along with exercises like head tucks and pull ins helped build muscle on my skinny mini. Both continue to be riden today and have minimal pains. It's all in how much your willing to do. If in doubt call your vet or another trusted horse handler. By all means. A horse is a big commitment and you should do whatever makes you comfortable. Hope this helps!
     
    07-19-2012, 12:32 AM
  #5
Foal
Sounds legit!

I -do not- mount from the ground. At all. Ever. I've heard too much bad stuff so I always use the block, or a picnic table, or whatever the landscape provides. Could not agree with you more!

She's asking $350. $300, because that's supposedly the going cost of a pasture buddy around here, and $50 for the round bale that she's eaten since she's been there. I only plan to use her for trails when applicable, horsemanship education (me, not other people. Haha. ) and general first-time non-eventer horse stuff.

Thanks for the great advice!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians    
Before I called the vet I'd call a chiropractor. They generally cost a lot less, do certain tests to find out where the pain response is, and then do manipulation, massage and adjustment to put the bones back where they belong (she could be out in her ribs as well as spine). My guy charges $100 for the first visit and $75 for any further visits.

After you either get her vetted or adjusted, I'd would invest in a 3 step plastic mounting block and use that to mount and dismount, don't do it from the ground anymore, it's very easy to pull her withers out of alignment from the ground, especially since you're a good sized rider. I either use my mounting steps, the tailgate of a truck, running board of a trailer, a rock, picnic table or stump or SOMETHING, never get on from the ground. I'll occasionally drop from the stirrup to the ground but since I'm only 5'2" and my mare is over 16 hands, that's a long drop so I'd rather get down onto something else too. I've hit the ground wrong and slid when landing and broke my wrist in 3 places. That pretty much cured me of the elevator drop dismount.

I don't know what she's asking for the horse but a good BASIC pre-purchase exam will generally run around $300-500 depending on how extensive the exam is, radiographs, ultrasounds, etc. Generally my rule of thumb is, if I can turn around tomorrow and resell the horse for what I have in her/him, then I skip the exam other than what I do myself. WARNING: I've been around horses for 40+ years and I still occasionally get burned anyhow. If the horse is over $5K then it's an automatic thorough exam, if I want the horse for something real strenuous (ok I don't do strenuous anymore, but like jumping, 50 miler endurance rides that kind of thing), automatic 4 legs x-rayed and ultrasounded. If I don't know the seller really well, it's a automatic minimum blood draw for narcotics too.

Since this horse is already demonstating physical issues, I would not skip the PPE period and my offer to buy would be contingent on the horse passing with a vet of YOUR chosing, not the seller's vet.
     
    07-19-2012, 12:53 AM
  #6
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by BossHoss    
Sounds legit!

I -do not- mount from the ground. At all. Ever. I've heard too much bad stuff so I always use the block, or a picnic table, or whatever the landscape provides. Could not agree with you more!

She's asking $350. $300, because that's supposedly the going cost of a pasture buddy around here, and $50 for the round bale that she's eaten since she's been there. I only plan to use her for trails when applicable, horsemanship education (me, not other people. Haha. ) and general first-time non-eventer horse stuff.

Thanks for the great advice!

Ok, based on this info, I'd have a chiro do an adjustment and overall just kind of feel her over and advise me on whether he felt the adjustment would take and hold. That's $100 vs $350, so you could end up saving $250 to put to another horse. If the horse was still squealing and ouchie after the chiro visit, I'd pass on her. I had a mare who was out in her hips because she was small and had been used as a broodie before I got her. I could not keep her in adjustment, so it always hurt her when someone tried to get on. The first 3 times we adjusted her, we actually had to tranq her almost to the point of laying her down, just so she wouldn't kick Doc's head off. She got better but not great, so she's back to being a broodie for someone else.
BossHoss likes this.
     
    07-19-2012, 01:01 AM
  #7
Foal
Thank you, Pat!! Great suggestion.
     
    07-19-2012, 02:36 AM
  #8
Trained
Hi,

From the look of those pics, while she's fat, she doesn't have much muscle on her topline. It also looks like she may have a lumbar problem. But basically, you are a 'plus size' rider & need a 'plus' size horse. I'd be looking at a drafty.
     
    07-19-2012, 03:18 AM
  #9
Foal
Thanks for the input!
Currently looking at what it takes to put muscle on topline. Will probably have a talk with an equine chiro.

Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Hi,

From the look of those pics, while she's fat, she doesn't have much muscle on her topline. It also looks like she may have a lumbar problem. But basically, you are a 'plus size' rider & need a 'plus' size horse. I'd be looking at a drafty.
     

Tags
back, new owner, xray

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Solving problems with "Roach back" ... Any advice? APHAforlife Horse Health 10 03-20-2012 10:58 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0