Sesmoiditis
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Sesmoiditis

This is a discussion on Sesmoiditis within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

    Like Tree2Likes
    • 2 Post By Patty Stiller

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        09-29-2013, 07:05 AM
      #1
    Weanling
    Sesmoiditis

    A horse I ride for a friend has Sesmoiditis. I am really wanting to learn more about it. The owner told me she had a paddock accident and got it in both front legs. When ever ridden now said horse wears support boots and owner doesnt know how far we can push her with out her pulling up lame.
    Has anyone dealt with it before?
    What was the out come?
    What is the horse doing now?
    This mare is still young, is there a possiblity of her doing cross country, showing, jumping and dreaasge again? Not high level stuff.
    TIA
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        09-29-2013, 10:18 AM
      #2
    Weanling
    Sesamoiditis is an inflammation of the ligaments that attach and support the two little sesamoid bones on the back of the fetlock.
    It comes from abnormal strain in the area. The usual cause is chronic strain from poor/incorrect trimming or shoeing (long toes, under run heels). Therefore the hooves should be looked at first and foremost.

    Other causes could be extreme work that causes extremes of fetlock flexion, (race horses, jumpers) or weak suspensory ligaments. (DSLD, or injury) .

    Fetlock support boots when in work can help BUT almost always a change in trimming or shoeing helps the most.
    loosie and Cherie like this.
         
        09-30-2013, 09:13 AM
      #3
    Super Moderator
    Patty is dead on. If this horse were mine, I would set front shoes back until the toe is near or at the white line and would have the farrier 'roll the toes'. This requires NOT using the toe nails in the shoes. I personally, would not use wedge shoes but would leave the heels of the shoes extend back to the bulbs of the horse's heels. You want to quicken the 'break-over' as much as possible and support the heels without getting a horse to stumble a lot.

    If you get any swelling or heat after riding, you know you have pushed too hard. That is also the time I would use DMSO with Cortisone in it to reduce the inflammation.
         

    Thread Tools



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:40 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0