Sheath cleaning.
 
 

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Sheath cleaning.

This is a discussion on Sheath cleaning. within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Sheath cleaning rick gore
  • Rick gore sheath cleaning

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  • 3 Post By equiniphile
  • 1 Post By QuietHeartHorses
  • 2 Post By AlexS

 
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    04-03-2013, 08:32 PM
  #1
Foal
Sheath cleaning.

I need help with the whole cleaning the sheath it needs to be done and I'm not grossed out by it but like on how to do it I'm lost. HELP PLEASE.
     
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    04-03-2013, 08:55 PM
  #2
Showing
Here's a video that explains it pretty well....just about the only video of his I'll ever recommend watching

Corporal, Ripplewind and Kendall like this.
     
    04-03-2013, 10:38 PM
  #3
Weanling
Easy peasy! I was hesitant at first too, but it's not that big of a deal. The only thing you should be cautious about is how your guy will respond to you being so personal with him. Just take it slow, pet him and give him light scratches all over and work your way down to his belly, eventually to his sheath. He might be a little confused and uncomfortable at first, but as long as you are reassuring and calm, he should be fine. Some geldings down right love sheath cleaning time. It is a little embarrassing, I'll admit... but it's a health thing, it's gotta be done, and it's over before you know it.

Check out this link, it's great! http://www.equusite.com/articles/hea...Cleaning.shtml

I read it before my first sheath cleaning experience and it made me feel a lot more confident. They suggest all kinds of products, but Excalibur is the best in my opinion. Also, if you can find those gloves like the ones that come in hair coloring kits, the thin plastic type ones, they work much better than rubber gloves. Rubber has a little too much grab. Also, don't be alarmed if your guy doesn't drop. Mine didn't, he was super shy about it, so I just cleaned as best as I could. A few weeks later, he dropped in the arena and everything looked nice and clean! Just make sure you get the bean, the figure on that website makes it seem like you have to go hunting for it, but you don't. It's right there at the end.

It's simple once you start, you'll see. There isn't much to it!
Kendall likes this.
     
    04-04-2013, 12:29 AM
  #4
Banned
It's not always easy. I just had my vet out on Monday for spring shots, so I asked him to do it for me. He sedated my horse, who is very well behaved and quiet usually. Waited for the meds to kick in, then went to work - my horse freaked out. He was given some more sedation, we waited again then started again. Still a freak out. He was finally twitched, along with the 2 sedations, and we still had to be very careful.

So heads up, by all means give it a try yourself. Some horses are just fine with it. I was amazed at my horses reaction, as it's just not like to be like that.
mustbemonroe and Kendall like this.
     
    04-04-2013, 04:22 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by QuietHeartHorses    
Easy peasy! I was hesitant at first too, but it's not that big of a deal. The only thing you should be cautious about is how your guy will respond to you being so personal with him. Just take it slow, pet him and give him light scratches all over and work your way down to his belly, eventually to his sheath. He might be a little confused and uncomfortable at first, but as long as you are reassuring and calm, he should be fine. Some geldings down right love sheath cleaning time. It is a little embarrassing, I'll admit... but it's a health thing, it's gotta be done, and it's over before you know it.

Check out this link, it's great! http://www.equusite.com/articles/hea...Cleaning.shtml

I read it before my first sheath cleaning experience and it made me feel a lot more confident. They suggest all kinds of products, but Excalibur is the best in my opinion. Also, if you can find those gloves like the ones that come in hair coloring kits, the thin plastic type ones, they work much better than rubber gloves. Rubber has a little too much grab. Also, don't be alarmed if your guy doesn't drop. Mine didn't, he was super shy about it, so I just cleaned as best as I could. A few weeks later, he dropped in the arena and everything looked nice and clean! Just make sure you get the bean, the figure on that website makes it seem like you have to go hunting for it, but you don't. It's right there at the end.

It's simple once you start, you'll see. There isn't much to it!

Thanks for the help
     
    04-09-2013, 01:35 PM
  #6
Weanling
Hmmm, I don't take a hose to the sheath like the video did- if your horse is already defensive and you shoot cold water up there... He might truly start disliking the whole process :/ I use warm water and mild ivory soap to get the smegma loosed up (which is not dirt, like the video said...) or I use Excalibur sheath cleaner. If you use Excalibur, put a handful up there and swish it around and let it soak for a bit; it is a gel and will not create suds if mixed with water. Once you let it loosen some stuff up, your gelding might even drop for the rinse off phase. Again, I try to use lukewarm water, if someone stuck a cold hose between [I]my[I] legs I'd be an unhappy camper!
The rest of the video seemed ok as far as where to stand, etc. That gelding was very tolerant, but if you've not done it before I would not use a hose until you know how he would react to the cool water on his bits :)
     
    04-09-2013, 02:26 PM
  #7
Trained
Start with approach and retreat EVERY DAY, and groom around it, approach and retreat every day. We have had like 8 posts on this in the last year. I have ALWAYS cleaned my horse's sheaths and the only one I missed was the mule that I owned for a short time. My geldings have never kicked me and I've owned about 27 geldings in almost 30 years.
The trick is to train them to accept cleaning but don't clean very long with you do. Do NOT clean the sheath like you are spring cleaning your kitchen and want to get every little bean and...stuff.
Clean often and only a little at at time.
I'm a little OCD about cleaning sheaths. =b
     
    04-09-2013, 02:29 PM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal    
Start with approach and retreat EVERY DAY, and groom around it, approach and retreat every day. We have had like 8 posts on this in the last year. I have ALWAYS cleaned my horse's sheaths and the only one I missed was the mule that I owned for a short time. My geldings have never kicked me and I've owned about 27 geldings in almost 30 years.
The trick is to train them to accept cleaning but don't clean very long with you do. Do NOT clean the sheath like you are spring cleaning your kitchen and want to get every little bean and...stuff.
Clean often and only a little at at time.
I'm a little OCD about cleaning sheaths. =b
Well, I'll bet your horses appreciate your attention to detail :)
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    04-09-2013, 02:38 PM
  #9
Trained
ROFLMAO!!!
My horses are mudballs right now!!!
     

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