Sheath Cleaning?... what about wild horses? - Page 3
 
 

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Sheath Cleaning?... what about wild horses?

This is a discussion on Sheath Cleaning?... what about wild horses? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
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        11-03-2009, 01:54 PM
      #21
    Showing
    Kevin, keeping a few small herds as a symbol, sure. I have no problem with that.

    Like you, what I do have a problem with, is that the BLM can't manage the land anymore, because they're unundated with these feral horses.

    Plus, no matter what plan the BLM comes up with, there's always some group of do-gooders screaming it's not enough, the BLM doesn't care about our 'national heritage', or they're only in it to get kickbacks from the 'greedy, rich, cattle ranchers'.

    People who only react on knee-jerk emotions and not actual research and facts are the ones who are the worst enemies of the feral horses, because they want what they want when they want it, and to hell with all that scientific data and stuff!
         
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        11-03-2009, 05:05 PM
      #22
    Green Broke
    I agree Kevinshorses, I actually just did a speech over sustainability and used the blm feral horse/mustang crisis. It is actually 3/4 of the budget, yeah its ridiculous....
         
        11-03-2009, 11:19 PM
      #23
    Yearling
    I had a paint gelding that I checked while the vet did his teeth.. the tip of his penis was rock hard (not normal) so I went to digging and it took two people to dig out his bean. It was the BIGGEST bean we had ever seen.. It was 1/2 the size of my palm. I set it down to grab my phone so I could get a picture and my dog ATE it... SOOOOOO NASTY!!
         
        11-03-2009, 11:21 PM
      #24
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by starlinestables    
    I had a paint gelding that I checked while the vet did his teeth.. the tip of his penis was rock hard (not normal) so I went to digging and it took two people to dig out his bean. It was the BIGGEST bean we had ever seen.. It was 1/2 the size of my palm. I set it down to grab my phone so I could get a picture and my dog ATE it... SOOOOOO NASTY!!

    I have a prretty strong stomach but I gagged a little when I read this. I can assume your dog doesn't lick your face any more.
         
        11-03-2009, 11:32 PM
      #25
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
    I have a prretty strong stomach but I gagged a little when I read this. I can assume your dog doesn't lick your face any more.
    She had the vet gagging! It was soooo gross.... and NO she doesn't come anywhere near my face. :o)

    My poor horse peed 3 times before coming out of sedation. He was obviously relieved BIG time.
         
        11-04-2009, 08:35 AM
      #26
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
    Feral horses die between 10 and 15 years old because nature is cruel, and only the young and strong survive.

    Domesticated horses, with proper nutrition, medical care, and upkeep, can live up to 40-45 years.

    A mustang, if taken off the range and domesticated, has as much chance as living a long healthy life as one born in a barn.

    Trying to continually compare horses who have to find their own way in the world versus those who are taken care of by humans, is a futile effort.

    The only reason our domestic horses live so long is because of the care they receive from their human handlers. If they were thrown out into nature, their lives would be as brutal and short as their feral cousins.

    Feral horses have smegma build up, too. They also have leg, feet, and back problems, as well as contract diseases. The only difference is that they don't live long enough to get old. Once a physical disability raises it's ugly head, the feral horse becomes food for a large predator.
    Couldn't agree more - very well said

    Quote:
    you have no idea how many times I have said the same thing to people. Barefoot trimming is fine but don't think that mustangs have perfect feet and are never lame. There is just nobody to see them when they limp.

    Kevinshorses I agree here too!! I have nothing against barefoot trimming at all, however feral horses basically go where they choose and step how they choose at a pace that they choose. They're not asked to do what we ask domesticated horses to do.

    I understand wanting to simulate ferals hoof conformation but comparing what feral horses vs domesticated horses do is like comparing apples to oranges IMO

    StarlineStables... EWWWWW!
         

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