Shelter - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Shelter

This is a discussion on Shelter within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • 50-40 Degrees Lightweight blanket
  • Should you take the heavyweight blanket off your horse during the day?

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    06-24-2011, 07:07 PM
  #11
Foal
I don't even own a blanket. No weight issues - Well maybe, but not because they're skinny : )
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    06-24-2011, 08:46 PM
  #12
Banned
Wink

Paint mom if you do decide to get blankets for your horses make sure they are turnout blankets. They are water proof and wind proof DO NOT buy stable blankets they are not water proof and will soak through. My horses wear turnouts and I never have a need to bring them in the winter. The blankets keep them warm and dry.
     
    06-24-2011, 09:07 PM
  #13
Foal
Now, If I were to use blankets on the cold/wet/windy days, and take the blankets off for most of the winter would their winter coat still work?

When would you draw the line... blanket or no blanket. -10 and only at night?

Or just for the few weeks that are really cold leave it on 24/7?

And when buying a blanket (a turnout one - thanks :)) what type do I get, and what's the best brand?

My biggest thing with blankets is I don't want to take away my horses natural ability to stay warm.
     
    06-25-2011, 12:33 AM
  #14
Banned
Wink

This last winter I put blankets on in early december we had a blizzard coming with rain ice first then heavy snow. I usally let them grow a full winter coat first but that didnt happen this last winter. I leave my blankets on all winter only take them off to groom once a week. And make sure there are no rubs from blankets.

As far as kind of blanket I use the storm sheilds from schneiders they seem to hold up good. Mine have all been in use for four to five winters only one ripped got snagged on a peice of wire. I buy the 1200 denier blankets they hold up better then the 600 denier. Blanketing really depends on how cold and wet your winters are we have long cold snowy winters.

Once a blanket has been put on it does flatten the coat so it can make them get cold if taken off. That's why I leave my horses blanketed all winter.
     
    06-25-2011, 08:21 PM
  #15
Yearling
Now, If I were to use blankets on the cold/wet/windy days, and take the blankets off for most of the winter would their winter coat still work? Once you blanket a horse you should keep them blanketed, I would rather blanket all the time and only take them off on nice, sunny days or not blanket at all because the blanket makes their fuzzy winter coat lay down and they can't warm themselves up.

When would you draw the line... blanket or no blanket. -10 and only at night?
Or just for the few weeks that are really cold leave it on 24/7?
Some people use a sheet when it gets below 50-40 to keep their coat short so they won't have the full winter coat under their blanket, then a medium-heavy weight for below 30 degrees. I personally don't want to buy a sheet (they can be just as expensive as blankets) so I'll blanket at night if needed but take off during the day instead until it's consistently cold during the day too.

And when buying a blanket (a turnout one - thanks :)) what type do I get, and what's the best brand?
You should look for a turnout blanket that's WATERPROOF, companies use lots of different words (ie. Weather proof, etc) but look for WATERPROOF and nothing else. I perfer Saxon blankets but everyone likes different brands. Make sure to get at least a medium weight blanket. Not sure what the temps get like by you but a lightweight doesn't usually cut it...heavyweights IMO are usually way too much for most average winter days. If it's going to be THAT cold your horse should have tons of hay available to them so they don't need a heavy weight blanket.

My biggest thing with blankets is I don't want to take away my horses natural ability to stay warm.
Then don't blanket There is no absolute need to, if your horses aren't skinny. The only time I think blankets can be really beneficial is with a rescue/old or any hard to keep weight on horse. Otherwise they really just make us feel better. I made the decision to keep my girls unblanketed this past winter because blankets can be alot of hassle, making sure they are on when it's below certain degrees, off when the suns out & it's warm, etc. you don't have to get all OCD about them like I do but...yeah. My girls will be spending another nekkid winter like last. They were happy and probably the fattest coming out of winter they ever have been because they had free choice hay.
     
    06-25-2011, 11:53 PM
  #16
Foal
OK, here come some newbie questions. What is free choice hay? Last winter my neighbor blanketed all of her horses, young and old. She keeps them in their stalls at night with the blankets on. The horses are fed morning and night in their stalls, getting full 4 or 5 pound coffee cans of Nutrena Triumph 10/10 sweet grain and two flakes of hay (each meal). Even now the horses are rarely worked or ridden as she doesn't have the time to devote to that. Now Flash is getting the same amount of food and hay as her horses, plus they graze in the pastures. (Right now the owner doesn't allow me to have any control over what she's fed.) Flash is 24 yo, so what do you suggest I do the rest of this summer (once she's moved here), and this coming winter?
     
    06-26-2011, 01:42 AM
  #17
Green Broke
I let my horses go "naked" with just a 3-sided run-in shed. I do have blankets, but only use them if I feel a specific horse needs it at a specific time.

For instance, my mustang looks like a wooly mammoth in winter and I never blanket him. I have never seen him shiver, even when wet.

But I have owned one Arabian and one Foxtrotter that if they get wet and it's cold, they will shiver. So 95% of the time they are without a blanket, but if there is going to be a blizzard or rain storm, I will try to blanket them before they get wet, and just for that storm. If I didn't get them blanketed before the storm and I found one wet and shivery, then I will do my best to towel dry them and then put on a blanket over night or until they are dry and warm.

We probably don't get as severe a winter as many of you though. Down around 10 degrees is normally the lowest, and I think I have only seen negative numbers once.
     
    06-26-2011, 03:00 AM
  #18
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLynn    
OK, here come some newbie questions. What is free choice hay? Last winter my neighbor blanketed all of her horses, young and old. She keeps them in their stalls at night with the blankets on. The horses are fed morning and night in their stalls, getting full 4 or 5 pound coffee cans of Nutrena Triumph 10/10 sweet grain and two flakes of hay (each meal). Even now the horses are rarely worked or ridden as she doesn't have the time to devote to that. Now Flash is getting the same amount of food and hay as her horses, plus they graze in the pastures. (Right now the owner doesn't allow me to have any control over what she's fed.) Flash is 24 yo, so what do you suggest I do the rest of this summer (once she's moved here), and this coming winter?
Free choice hay is where the horse can eat hay 24/7, usually from a round bale. Free choice just means that the horse is free to choose when it wants to eat and how much.

As for Flash, as long as she gets a good winter coat and she keeps her weight on during the winter, you can let her be blanket free or do the same as the neighbor. They probably keep the blanket on when in the stall because the barn isn't heated.

As someone else said on here, when we blanket a horse, it is more for us to feel better than for the horse. Granted there are some horses that need it, most will get by just fine without one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
I let my horses go "naked" with just a 3-sided run-in shed. I do have blankets, but only use them if I feel a specific horse needs it at a specific time.

For instance, my mustang looks like a wooly mammoth in winter and I never blanket him. I have never seen him shiver, even when wet.

But I have owned one Arabian and one Foxtrotter that if they get wet and it's cold, they will shiver. So 95% of the time they are without a blanket, but if there is going to be a blizzard or rain storm, I will try to blanket them before they get wet, and just for that storm. If I didn't get them blanketed before the storm and I found one wet and shivery, then I will do my best to towel dry them and then put on a blanket over night or until they are dry and warm.

We probably don't get as severe a winter as many of you though. Down around 10 degrees is normally the lowest, and I think I have only seen negative numbers once.
We do the same, only blanket when the weather gets severe. Some say you should blanket when a horse shivers, but I've seen horses shiver at warmer temps, like 40 F. If we were to blanket them then, in the fall, they would never get any winter coat and would not be able to handle it when the temps get way below zero, in the middle of winter.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Little owl in my horse shelter!! Equus_girl General Off Topic Discussion 15 03-02-2011 02:03 PM
Opinion on shelter tattoogunman Barn Maintenance 18 06-16-2010 10:35 AM
Shade/shelter from the sun tattoogunman Horse Talk 10 06-01-2010 05:51 PM
Help, We need ideas for shelter pseank Barn Maintenance 3 02-23-2010 01:31 PM
Pasture shelter FlutingRider Horse Tack and Equipment 14 08-14-2008 02:36 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0