Speaking of deworming...
 
 

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Speaking of deworming...

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  • Can I worm my horse during hot summer months?

 
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    06-18-2009, 03:47 PM
  #1
Yearling
Speaking of deworming...

I live in central Colorado (east of the Rockies)... how often should I deworm our quarter horses? They are the only horses we have, and they are not often in contact with other horses.
     
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    06-18-2009, 04:44 PM
  #2
Started
They should be dewormed regularly. It doesn't matter if they come in contact with other horses, they get it from everyday things.. grass, dirt, hay, and just being outside.
     
    06-18-2009, 09:28 PM
  #3
Foal
I live in the same area and I worm my horses(2arabs,1 appy) every 2 months. It is important to switch wormer evry two rounds, so your horses don't build up an immunity.
     
    06-19-2009, 09:03 AM
  #4
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Equestriun    
They should be dewormed regularly. It doesn't matter if they come in contact with other horses, they get it from everyday things.. grass, dirt, hay, and just being outside.
My question is, for my area, what is considered "regularly". Some say every 8 weeks, others say Spring and Fall.
     
    06-19-2009, 10:44 AM
  #5
Yearling
The old "deworm every 6-8 weeks rotating dewormers" plan is one that needs to be forgotten. This is according to a panel of world-reknowned parasitologists that got together in KY a couple of months ago to host an equine parasite control seminar for veterinary professionals. This type of deworming program doesn't take into account environmental conditions, the type of parasites which are truly the main concern now, the difference in the drugs that we currently use, the situational conditions of each horse or the individual resistance to parasites that each horse develops. The frequent use of dewormers without taking these things into account has led to the widespread development of strongyles that are resistant to the drugs we use and it's only going to get worse.

It's now known that all adult horses living in the same situation do not necessarily need to be dewormed on the same schedule. 50% of horses in a herd will control parasite loads on their own due to natural resistance. Only about 20-30% of horses carry heavy parasite loads. Thus each horse should be dewormed based upon an understanding of his own personal resistance to parasites. The best recommendation is now 2-4 dewormings a year based upon knowing which horses carry lots of parasites and which tend to carry little parasite load.

Rotational deworming is no longer an adequate or appropriate deworming program for adult horses. There are too many issues with strongyles developing resistance to 2 of the 4 most commonly used dewormers on the market---fenbendazole (more than 90% of areas tested have resistant strongyles) and pyrantel (around 1/2 of areas tested have strongyles resistant to this drug). And resistance is starting to be seen in strongyles to ivermectin---1st study showing it was done in KY in the last couple of years.

All adult horses in the continental US/Canada should be dewormed spring and fall with ivermectin/praziquantel or moxidectin/praziquantel. Other than those 2 standard dewormings, the rest of the deworming program should be based upon location and the horse's own resistance to parasites. The new recommendation is 2-4 dewormings per year based upon fecal egg counts used to determine the normal amount of egg shedding each horse does during the time of year when the weather in your area is most conducive to strongyle larva development and environmental survival. In the northern states in the US and in Canada, this means running a fecal egg count in the middle of summer (3 months after spring dosing if you used ivermectin or 4 months after spring dosing if you used ivermectin). In the southern US and Mexico you would be looking at testing in the middle of the winter (same time after spring deworming as listed above). Then based upon the number of eggs per gram of feces you can determine if you need more than the spring/fall dewormings and if so if you need 1 or 2 more dosings.

In the northern US and Canada, deworming should be discontinued during the winter months because the environmental conditions are not conducive to reinfection---that time of year has been proven to have extremely low reinfection rates. In the southern US and Mexico the opposit is true....deworming can be discontinued during the heat of summer because temps over 85 degrees lead to the infective strongyle larva dying quickly in the environment so the reinfection rates are lowest then.

For more detailed information check out the deworming webinar that was aired via The Horse magazine's website in April. Be prepared to sit for a while because it is an hour long presentation, but it's well worth the time. The veterinarian gives you all the information on strongyles and deworming in adult horses that you've always wanted to know and then some. It is a wonderful lecture. (And have plenty of paper and a pen.) The Horse: Videos
     
    06-19-2009, 10:46 AM
  #6
Yearling
Thanks!!
     

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