Stifle problem? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 19 Old 05-10-2013, 08:21 AM
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I have heard that trotting in straight lines up hills really helps a lot.

There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man. ~Winston Churchill
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post #12 of 19 Old 05-10-2013, 08:29 AM
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I'm wondering about "kissing spine" (disks rubbing) which can cause wonky hind legs.
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post #13 of 19 Old 05-10-2013, 03:05 PM Thread Starter
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The vet just left. He didn't really have an answer for me. He watched Jack walk and trot and also performed a flexion test on him and he passed with flying colors. He said that there were no signs of arthritis that he could tell, his back was not sore, and took some blood to test for lyme. He thought that Jack looked completely healthy, complimented me on my trim job, and recommended to start using a grazing muzzle as Jack was borderline fat.lol. He suggested that I give him bute before really strenuous exercise and work him alot on walking and trotting (big circles are ok) to get him really strong before I start working on his canter again. I can't wait for the results of the Lyme test to come back! Something tells me he has it... we'll see though!
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post #14 of 19 Old 05-10-2013, 03:17 PM
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Just noticed you also live in New England - yes the ticks are already bad this year and Lymes will cause lameness amongst other things - . 3 of mine have had it in the past with different symptoms - I get them tested now every year just in case as it can lie there and do nothing for a while then get up and bite them
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post #15 of 19 Old 05-10-2013, 03:28 PM Thread Starter
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I'm in Massachusetts. We just moved here last year from VT and the ticks are about a gazillion times worse. I never actually pulled a tick off of any animal until we moved here and now I pull from 3-10 ticks off of Jack every.single.day. They're horrible!
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post #16 of 19 Old 05-10-2013, 03:42 PM
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I'd never seen a tick on a horse in the UK so I think mine had no resistance at all - same with the dogs, they all got Lymes too
Use sprays regularly and my vet uses Frontline dabbed under their chin and behind each heel - I'm doing that now, once a month seems to be enough to help but do a small test first in case of allergic reaction
Not much else you can do - clip away long hair where they can hide and the deer ticks almost always cause a small pea size swelling
Keep your grass short - worse in long grass as the birds etc can't find them to eat so easily and cut back low branches that the hang off and drop on the horses (and people)
Yuk.
I'm thinking about trying fly boots this year
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post #17 of 19 Old 05-11-2013, 01:23 PM
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Did he look anything like this?


That is my mare. The vet couldn't figure it out either. We tried injecting her stifles and it didn't help. Either she has soft tissue damage to her stifles or arthritic hocks or something in her back/hip. (X rays showed very minor arthritis started. She is only 8 yrs old).

I am planning on getting a second opinion. She also trots sound and only has issues at the canter. She injured her stifles as a 2 yr old. I think this is related to that and only now becoming apparent. Or it could be unrelated.

Your horse probably does have something wrong with him. My mare flexes sound unless you modify the flexion (hold the foot back like the farrier does and flex it up that way). Wish I could explain it better. It is not the regular flexion where you hold the foot more forward to flex the hock. It does explain why she is bad for the farrier with her back feet. Our farrier is very understanding at least!
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post #18 of 19 Old 05-11-2013, 01:25 PM
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The vet should have cantered him as well. Not all lameness is apparent at the trot.
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post #19 of 19 Old 05-12-2013, 04:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4horses View Post
The vet should have cantered him as well. Not all lameness is apparent at the trot.
She's changing leads... my horse did this when he was not that schooled at the canter.

I'd look at it as a training issue more so than a stifle issue since she seems to do it both ways and not just favor one direction in particular. Canter her a few strides and then go back to trot. Canter her a few strides, back to trot. Trotting doesn't have "leads," canter does.

"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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