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Stocking Up?

This is a discussion on Stocking Up? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        02-13-2013, 06:53 PM
      #11
    Showing
    Good circulation prevents stocking up (my understanding) so the fact that he got DAILY exercise back on stall rest.. prevented or minimized the stocking up. Turning out for 2 hours is helpful but the rest of the 20 hours left in the day he gets no chance of exercise ?

    Perhaps you should consider taking him out more.. if you have an indoor arena let him loose with a buddy or just by himself and let him walk around and be active.
         
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        02-13-2013, 07:09 PM
      #12
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
    Turning out for 2 hours is helpful but the rest of the 20 hours left in the day
    Sky, it may surprise you to know, there are actually 24 hours in a day!
    Eolith, Kayella and Muppetgirl like this.
         
        02-13-2013, 07:10 PM
      #13
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    Sky, it may surprise you to know, there are actually 24 hours in a day!


    It's a good thing I'm not an accountant!

    I meant 22 hours, lol.. cause 22+2 is 24

    Do I get a gold star now?
    Eolith, loosie, BBBCrone and 2 others like this.
         
        02-13-2013, 07:18 PM
      #14
    Green Broke
    I am using the Keratex with a recommendation from the farrier. I started him on it 4 weeks ago and am now beginning to use it every other day. I have noticed a difference in his feet already. The Enrich 32, I follow the amount that is told to feed on the bag. I did sign up for FeedXL and checked everything out. While some levels are higher than they should be, they are not at a "dangerous" level. I added the pound of alfalfa pellets while he was on the dex as it can deplete calcium levels.

    If there is something out there healthier for him, I would more than gladly switch him over. I was feeding SafeChoice but was told that was not a good feed for youngins. So I was told to try the RB. The only negative thing I've noticed is he's a pig and wolfs down the tiny pellets, choking on them But since I've started soaking his feed, he hasn't choked once. Is there any feed you would recommend for him? Everything that I'm feeding/applying has been approved by my vet and farrier.

    As for his feet, I wish I had copies of the radiographs. I do have a typed analysis on my computer at home that I can copy here when I get home. Overall, his PA was around -3 degrees on all feet. That is of most concern right now. Both his hoof walls and his soles were thin by a few MMs. I also remember the term "bull nose" or something like that from the laminar stretching out to meet the coffin bone? I'll definitely have to copy and paste the analysis here for more help haha.
         
        02-13-2013, 07:18 PM
      #15
    Showing
    You might cut back on the Purina to about half at this time. If he is stalled most of the time he should be on just hay. Invest in another net and hang it in the opposite corner. A horse drinks 2 or 3 times but the two nets will encourage him to move back and forth. I don't know why they do that but I've seen it many times.
         
        02-14-2013, 12:00 AM
      #16
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayella    
    The Enrich 32, I follow the amount that is told to feed on the bag. I did sign up for FeedXL and checked everything out. While some levels are higher than they should be, they are not at a "dangerous" level. I added the pound of alfalfa pellets while he was on the dex as it can deplete calcium levels.

    If there is something out there healthier for him, I would more than gladly switch him over. I was feeding SafeChoice but was told that was not a good feed for youngins. So I was told to try the RB. The only negative thing I've noticed is he's a pig and wolfs down the tiny pellets, choking on them ... Everything that I'm feeding/applying has been approved by my vet and farrier.
    I always opt for low NSC, high fibre forage type feeds where possible, though with a very low dose 'ration balancer' such as KER for eg, as they only get in the realm of 80g daily, it doesn't matter so much. I don't personally like Purina & others who use 'product'(ie whatever they like that is the cheapest, usually by-products, rather than good & fixed ingredients). Also considering the endemic numbers of insulin resistant & obese horses, I tend to avoid products with molasses. They're the things I don't like about that particular product, but as with everything, it can depend & is also an opinion

    Recommended amounts from manufacturers are typically higher than what is actually needed. That's great that you've been aware of & careful about balancing nutrients. Like I said, it *may* not be right, but if it's been carefully considered, nutrition-wise, it could well be perfect! I think it's important not to oversupply protein & also what sort of protein you're giving, and also calcium is another one that can be problematic, because it is tied up with Phosphorus, Magnesium & so much else. Current research also suggests that commonly accepted ratios of Ca/Mg may leave Mg sorely lacking, particularly in situations of stress, among other things. That's bodily, metabolic, mental stress, for eg.

    Quote:
    Overall, his PA was around -3 degrees on all feet. .... I also remember the term "bull nose" or something
    Hmm, yes, vital that you're onto that. Yes, the dorsal wall appearing 'bullnosed' - that is, bulging - is one sign of possible/likely neg. PA. But that's obviously been confirmed with the rads anyway. Using padding to provide support at the back of the foot - under the frog - without putting heel walls under pressure - eg frog support wedges, can be very helpful, especially if thin soles mean there's nowhere else to go.
         
        02-14-2013, 12:55 AM
      #17
    Green Broke
    I did end up decreasing his feed to 2 pounds of the RB. I'll be looking at the feed store to see if they carry Triple Crown or another good quality ration balancer.

    As for his feet, this is the analysis from the radiographs. It's a lot of info!

    LEFT FRONT VIEW OF DISTAL PASTERN= PALMER ANGLE - NEGATIVE 3 DEGREES, SOLE DEPTH- 10 MM, HORN/LAMINAR ZONE - 11/11 MM, CORONARY BAND/EXTENSOR PROCESS MEASUREMENT - POSITIVE 2 MM. POOR BONEY ALIGNMENT OF THE BONES OF THE PASTERN, WITH SUBLAXATION OF THE SECOND PASTERN BONE.

    CONCERNS - PALMER ANGLE, ANGLE OF THE BOTTOM OF THE COFFIN BONE IN RELATIONSHIP TO THE GROUND SURFACE IS TOO LOW. THIS CONFORMATION ISSUE WILL CAUSE INCREASE TENSION ON THE DEEP DIGITAL FLEXOR TENDON AS IT TRAVELS OVER THE DISTAL/PALMER SURFACE OF THE NAVICULAR BONE, OF THE COFFIN BONE, AND ITS ATTACHMENTS TO THE HOOF CAPSULE [THE REASON FOR THE BULL NOSE LESION AND THE INCREASED CORTICAL THICKNESS OF THE COFFIN BONE] PUSHES THE COFFIN BONE TOO FORWARD IN THE VASCULAR COMPLEX AND DECREASES PERFUSION TO THE SOLAR CORIUM WHICH RESULTS IN POOR SOLAR DEPTH. SOLE DEPTH, NEED A MINIMUM OF 15 MM FOR ADEQUATE PERFUSION AND PROTECTION OF THE COFFIN BONE, IS TOO THIN. THIS, MOST LIKELY, IS A RESULT OF THE POOR PALMER ANGLE AND POOR ALIGNMENT OF THE BONES OF THE PASTERN.

    RIGHT FRONT - LATERAL VIEW OF THE LATERAL PASTERN -PALMER ANGLE NEGATIVE 3 DEGREES, SOLE DEPTH 13MM, HORN/LAMINAR ZONE=15/14 MM
    CORONARY BAND/EXTENSOR PROCESS MEASUREMENT - 8 MM. "BULL NOSE" APPEARANCE OF THE DORSAL COFFIN BONE. INCREASED CORTICAL THICKNESS OF COFFIN BONE, POOR BONEY ALIGNMENT OF THE BONES OF THE PASTERN WITH SUBLAXATION OF THE SECOND PASTERN BONE.

    LEFT HINDLIMB - LATERAL VIEW OF DISTAL PASTERN - PA=NEGATIVE 1 DEGREE, SOLE DEPTH, 12 MM H/L ZONE - 10/10 MM, CORONARY BAND/EXTENSOR PROCESS MEASUREMENT - O MM. POOR BONEY ALIGNMENT OF THE BONES OF THE PASTERN.

    RIGHT HINDLIMB - LATERAL VIEW OF DISTAL PASTERN- PA NEGATIVE 3 DEGREES, SD = 10 MM, H/L ZONE- 10/11 MM, CORONARY BAND/EXTENSOR
    PROCESS MEASUREMENT - 4 MM. SMALL OSTEOPHYTE ON DORSO/PROXIMAL P11. INCREASED CORTICAL THICKNESS OF DORSAL COFFIN BONE WITH A "BULL NOSE" LESION. POOR BONEY ALIGNMENT OF THE BONES OF THE PASTERN.
         
        02-14-2013, 08:43 AM
      #18
    Weanling
    What Causes Stocking Up in Horses and How to Prevent It

    I used to worry about stocking up too, but this article is great.
         
        02-14-2013, 10:49 AM
      #19
    Green Broke
    Oh I actually read that article when he first started stocking up! :) It's a great read. I'm not particularly concerned about him stocking up. I just wanted to know if his poor feet condition made him more prone to stocking up. I know one's the lymphatic system and the other is the circulatory system now(which makes so much sense. I knew it was fluids pooling up but didn't really think about it) but I don't know if there is some small correlation between the two? What is puzzling me is we went through the same routine of exercise while he was on stall rest. He was actually getting a bit less exercise at that point. The only difference between the two times is the dex and bute. I'm sure the dex played a large part of it because it helped to keep his cranial swelling down. I didn't think it would have that much of an impact, though. It's surprising how many things correlate with each other that you don't really think about.
         
        02-14-2013, 12:09 PM
      #20
    Weanling
    The circulatory system is somewhat separate from the lymph system, but there is a correlation in that some processes in the body make blood vessels leakier than usual. Inflammation is one of them. So with inflammation there will be more fluid for the lymph system to process than usual, and if the muscles are working less to push the fluids back up against gravity, that would make things even worse.

    Dexamethasone is a steroid and suppresses the immune system, so decreases the inflammatory response and the leakiness of the blood vessels. Bute also is an anti-inflammatory. It seems that if a horse was stocking up more than usual due to inflammation, either of these medications would cause less fluid to build up.
    Kayella likes this.
         

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