Strange bulges on hooves--I'm really worried, please help
 
 

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Strange bulges on hooves--I'm really worried, please help

This is a discussion on Strange bulges on hooves--I'm really worried, please help within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Bulging hoof
  • Bulging in horses hoof

 
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    03-25-2008, 04:52 PM
  #1
Foal
Strange bulges on hooves--I'm really worried, please help

My new mare, Lucy, has these odd looking bulges in the cornet area of all four of her feet. I just noticed it a few days ago. She was trimmed by my farrier on Wednesday 13 March, and nothing was noted. My farrier said her feet looked great. I am slighty concerned about founder, but I've made sure to take all precautions against it since I got her two weeks ago. She arrived in pitiful condition, very emaciated.

Here are some pictures.







     
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    03-26-2008, 04:03 AM
  #2
Banned
They look fairly normal to me. Those lines down her hooves can be asociated with stress i've been told.
You say the farrier has just come recently? The angle of her hooves don't look right, to long and sloping. I would get a different farrier. Just me opinion...
     
    03-26-2008, 07:46 AM
  #3
Yearling
If you just got her, it could just be a result of the changes in diet (nutrients ect.) I don't think its anything to worry about.

On the other hand, your farrier did an awful job on those hooves. Don't ever get that farrier out again.
     
    03-26-2008, 10:03 AM
  #4
Foal
Thanks for the input; I was hoping the diet change was the cause. She basically had been turned out all winter, right off the track, so she had no nutrition and no hoof care. Her feet looked worse when I got her. She had a 'racetrack trim' where they leave the toes very long and the horses have no heel. Her feet still look bad because it's something that can't be changed overnight. My OTTB gelding looked like this when we got him, but now his feet don't even look like TB feet.

Thanks for putting me at ease.
     
    03-26-2008, 10:48 AM
  #5
Weanling
Actually. I disagree. This is the work of your farrier. When you trim a horse, especially if it intended for a barefoot hoof, you want the "bulge" filed so that the pressure from taking a step works mechanically with the rest if the horse. How to put this simply, I'm really working on it. Haha. With those bulges there, it puts a 'break' if you will in the weight bearing force he uses when taking steps...by filing those bulges down to be level with the rest of his foot, so that if you laid a straight edge from his coronet to his toe, you wouldnt be able to see light. (Ideally) Those bulges just puts a slightly extra stress on your horse's movement.
Next time your farrier comes out, say politely, " I read something about this yada yad yada and I want to try and file those bulges down" or something of the sort so that you don't offend him. Im not quite sure if any of that made any sense..if anyone agrees and is able to put is more simple, have at it! Lol
     
    03-26-2008, 10:51 AM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Katie
If you just got her, it could just be a result of the changes in diet (nutrients ect.) I don't think its anything to worry about.

On the other hand, your farrier did an awful job on those hooves. Don't ever get that farrier out again.
I forgot about your post, and I agree..However, if your farrier is open for suggestions as to how you want your horse's foot, and you've always liked the guy, try that first. If this is your first time w/ him, maybe find someone else. Finding the perfect farrier is an endless battle as far as I'm concerned!!
     
    03-26-2008, 11:17 AM
  #7
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by koomy56
Actually. I disagree. This is the work of your farrier. When you trim a horse, especially if it intended for a barefoot hoof, you want the "bulge" filed so that the pressure from taking a step works mechanically with the rest if the horse. How to put this simply, I'm really working on it. Haha. With those bulges there, it puts a 'break' if you will in the weight bearing force he uses when taking steps...by filing those bulges down to be level with the rest of his foot, so that if you laid a straight edge from his coronet to his toe, you wouldnt be able to see light. (Ideally) Those bulges just puts a slightly extra stress on your horse's movement.
Next time your farrier comes out, say politely, " I read something about this yada yad yada and I want to try and file those bulges down" or something of the sort so that you don't offend him. Im not quite sure if any of that made any sense..if anyone agrees and is able to put is more simple, have at it! Lol
I agree with Koomy. Unfortunately the farrier did do this and I can clearly see he rasped the toe that way. This is going to add excess stress on your horses hoof, its almost like the are half-clubfooted. It is putting excess stress on bulge the and the internal structure of the hoof because the angle is so sharp.
     
    03-26-2008, 11:58 AM
  #8
Foal
The bulges weren't there when she trimmed Lucy last. I just spoke to her this morning, and we took pictures before and after the trim and then these pictures that I posted, and the bulges appeared over a week after she trimmed her. My farrier trimmed Lucy the day after I got her when she was emaciated. She has since been putting on weight and gaining nutrition, which is why I can believe the bulges are caused by the nutritional factor.
     
    03-28-2008, 04:26 AM
  #9
Showing
The main thing I see is a terrible farrier job. I would get a different farrier to come out and do your horses. Is she getting all the food she needs? Your horse's health really shows its truth in your horse's hooves.
     
    03-30-2008, 09:31 AM
  #10
Yearling
How is the little horse doing??
     

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