Sudden Death in Otherwise Healthy Mare - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

 6Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 24 Old 10-19-2012, 01:04 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,712
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom View Post
Poor thing - did she end up in a vegetative state? Or still functioning? Must have been horrible to watch, it's always awful when there's nothing you can do...
She actually was just about to race that day and she'd thrown a shoe, so we took her out of the cross ties to hold her while the blacksmith put on a new shoe, and then she just went into this crazed robotic state, if you could imagine a kid flipping and rotating a plastic toy horse around, that's what it looked like.

She had to stay at the track where we had travelled to because she obviously couldn't be transported. She stayed there for six months.....and believe it or not the owners sent her back to go into training again! I took care of her for the first week or so while she was at our barn after the accident, and she just walked robotically around her pen, was not very responsive to anything, not dangerous, just switched off, like she couldn't hear or see anything, or she could see and hear but just didn't produce any kind of describable response. The boss asked me to make the call and I said 'no' she should be turned out or perhaps later in the future be a brood mare.....but she was what I would call a functioning vegetable.
Muppetgirl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 24 Old 10-19-2012, 03:17 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 2,069
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muppetgirl View Post
She actually was just about to race that day and she'd thrown a shoe, so we took her out of the cross ties to hold her while the blacksmith put on a new shoe, and then she just went into this crazed robotic state, if you could imagine a kid flipping and rotating a plastic toy horse around, that's what it looked like.

She had to stay at the track where we had travelled to because she obviously couldn't be transported. She stayed there for six months.....and believe it or not the owners sent her back to go into training again! I took care of her for the first week or so while she was at our barn after the accident, and she just walked robotically around her pen, was not very responsive to anything, not dangerous, just switched off, like she couldn't hear or see anything, or she could see and hear but just didn't produce any kind of describable response. The boss asked me to make the call and I said 'no' she should be turned out or perhaps later in the future be a brood mare.....but she was what I would call a functioning vegetable.
That is so sad! Can't believe the owners wanted her to continue racing! I've seen a lot of good and bad in the racing industry and that falls into my "bad" basket...I wonder how she would have been as a broodmare and if she would have cared for her foal or needed a foster mare? If I'm correct her instincts to eat and drink were uninhibited? But mothering is more complex than that, so I would be interested to see. Hmmm.

OP - yes, I would have been incredibly disappointed with that vet too! It really didn't sound like colic at all... But there are good vets and not-so-good vets it seems. I seem to have been lucky in my interactions with them (and with farriers - all mine have been brilliant!). Have you changed vets since? Or not much choice in your area?

A crazy girl with a crazy horse
EvilHorseOfDoom is offline  
post #13 of 24 Old 10-19-2012, 06:50 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 922
• Horses: 2
Could it be some kind of seizure? Sounds kind of like a mare out here in Hawaii. They assume she has a seizure disorder but no one knows for sure and there are only two eq vets on the island, neither of which I would let take care of my dog let alone my horse. The mare I'm talking about is a little different, but same style of collapsing. Don't let this change your mind. IMO, your going to make one hell of a vet, look how much you care. Just learn from what you feel the other vet could've done differently.
Army wife is offline  
post #14 of 24 Old 10-19-2012, 08:07 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Kernersville, NC
Posts: 81
• Horses: 0
Goodness! That is terrifying! Nothing in that episode makes me think colic. At all. I don't blame you for searching for more answers.

Heir to America
1999 - APHA
krisfulc is offline  
post #15 of 24 Old 10-19-2012, 08:37 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 6
• Horses: 0
EHOD-the mare was owned by a boarder, and the boarder used this vet. So, I didn't have my choice of who to call, and hasn't worked with this one before in order to know NOT to call her, unfortunately.

Army- she definitely had a seizure, without question. The question is: what caused the seizure (and everything else, for that matter)? Thank you very much for your support. It means a lot!

Krisfulc- thank you, and yes, it was terrifying, indeed.
Posted via Mobile Device
Army wife likes this.
moorel15 is offline  
post #16 of 24 Old 10-19-2012, 09:35 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,712
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom View Post
That is so sad! Can't believe the owners wanted her to continue racing! I've seen a lot of good and bad in the racing industry and that falls into my "bad" basket...I wonder how she would have been as a broodmare and if she would have cared for her foal or needed a foster mare? If I'm correct her instincts to eat and drink were uninhibited? But mothering is more complex than that, so I would be interested to see. Hmmm.

OP - yes, I would have been incredibly disappointed with that vet too! It really didn't sound like colic at all... But there are good vets and not-so-good vets it seems. I seem to have been lucky in my interactions with them (and with farriers - all mine have been brilliant!). Have you changed vets since? Or not much choice in your area?
I never did find out if she was used as a broodmare or not....certainly not a riding horse for sure.........yes she went from a horse with a whole lot of sass and personality, to a robot. Yes I think she would've just ignored the foal if she had one.......
Muppetgirl is offline  
post #17 of 24 Old 10-19-2012, 05:44 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 5,995
• Horses: 0
I do not think it was EEE or WEE or WNV because of the fast onset. VEE has not been around except one time back in the 70s. I saw hundreds of horses die then.

I do not think the horse 'bled out' because there is no place inside the skull for 4 or 5 gallons of blood. Only the stomach cavity can hold that much blood. The pale gums can also be from a catastrophic drop in blood pressure -- shock. That is what I would guess -- but then that is a symptom and not a cause.

The cause of the shock I would guess was a Cardiovascular brain event, either a stroke, aneurism, or some other brain bleed or a tumor that reached a vital spot. Head trauma (like a kick from another horse) could also be a cause.

Vets do not usually initiate postmortem exams unless they 'personally' want to know what happened. Someone has to pay for the exam and they usually are not cheap. If lab work (like tissue samples, etc) are sent in, they are VERY expensive. Someone has to order and pay for most exams. If a contagious disease is suspected, the State Vet may order one, but then they will usually shut down a place with a quarantine until results are back.
Foxhunter and moorel15 like this.

visit us at www.wolferanch.com
Cherie is offline  
post #18 of 24 Old 10-19-2012, 06:45 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: SW UK
Posts: 9,620
• Horses: 0
I go along with Cherie, I will also add that horses in a lot of pain will often stand with their head pressing against something or even rock banging their heads against the wall.

I had one brood mare that was not in foal that year. She was fine in the morning and then when I went to feed in the afternoon she started to trot across the field, suddenly staggered, went down, got up, was very disorientated, took off at a gallop and dropped dead before she had gone 100 yards. The only sign was blood from one nostril.
She too was very pale gummed.

The Hunt collected her and I went to see if anything was obvious, which it wasn't
My vet thought it was an aneurism in the brain.

These things happen, it is often put down to a heart attack but they are very rare in horses usually it is a bad internal bleed.
Foxhunter is offline  
post #19 of 24 Old 10-19-2012, 07:11 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ontario
Posts: 17,193
• Horses: 0
I don't know why you are doubting the vet, she went to school for a very long time. There are certain clinical signs they look for that may not be apparent to the layman.
Saddlebag is offline  
post #20 of 24 Old 10-19-2012, 08:49 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Michigan
Posts: 6,772
• Horses: 2
How terrible.
Posted via Mobile Device

Last edited by CLaPorte432; 10-19-2012 at 08:57 PM.
CLaPorte432 is offline  
Reply

Tags
equine care , equine medicine , health

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
4 yo mare just became agressive all of a sudden in the coral. NerissaLynn Horse Training 11 09-01-2012 07:14 PM
horse disposal- of a healthy 4 year old mare??! aliceluvsSpring Horse Talk 5 08-08-2012 08:44 AM
What is going on with mare's sudden bad behavior? Kymbadina Horse Training 17 01-18-2011 08:58 PM
How to keep an older mare healthy Ilovemyarab Horse Health 0 06-22-2010 07:17 PM
Help! Emergancy!!!!!! Mare running foal to death!!!!! StormyBlues Horse Health 36 02-25-2009 03:26 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome