Sweet Feed - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Sweet Feed

This is a discussion on Sweet Feed within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Starting horse on sweet feed
  • Sweet feed and flies

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    10-03-2008, 05:43 AM
  #11
Weanling
Here's another interesting article.

http://www.westwayfeed.com/documents...eractivity.htm

I've always felt that the sweet feed and hot horses correlation to be a myth. I have never, ever seen it in my own horses, nor in any that I have rescued nor any boarded in my facility. This being said, we are not a "show" barn, thus our horses are turned out 24/7 unless foaling or injured. It is my personal belief that horses that are in more "natural" settings tend to be less hot. That also being said, for the most part, I do not feed a sweet feed. Not because I have anything inherently against it, but I prefer a locally milled feed that is very similar to Stradegy.

Most people who believe this (myth?) will be firm in their belief that sweet feed makes a horse hot. Those who don't believe this possible myth are also just as firm in thier belief.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    10-03-2008, 06:34 AM
  #12
Started
http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=12559

Quote:
Young horses might be easier to train if they temporarily lay off the sweets, according to a Montana State University (MSU) study that tracked behavior of 2-year-olds in training and compared it to their nutrition program.

The extra energy provided by sweet feed during the early stages of training made the horses in MSU's study more disobedient and fearful than horses that only ate hay, said Jan Bowman, MS, PhD, an animal nutritionist at MSU.

The study involved 12 closely-related Quarter Horses that came from one Idaho ranch, Bowman said. Wade Black, instructor of the MSU Colt Starting class and one of Bowman's graduate students, trained the horses for three weeks, five days a week at MSU's Miller Livestock Pavilion. Half the horses ate only hay, which was a mixture of grass and alfalfa. The other horses ate five pounds of sweet grain a day in addition to the hay. Both groups ate as much hay and drank as much water as they wanted
.

I copy and pasted the first part of this you have to sign in to read it ... the Horse is a great resource site and it's FREE!!!
     
    10-03-2008, 01:05 PM
  #13
Yearling
My experiences have been along the same lines as TxHorseMom. I think some key words in above article is excess and extra. There are some trainers who will withhold or limit feed from a horse on days they train, when the owner is due to show up or before a show for the opposite reason (lower energy levels = "calmer" horse). If a horse has a more natural environment available to it, he will have a better overall attitude in general with an added benefit of the ability to burn off extra energy in a constructive manner.

Just my opinion...your mileage may vary.
     
    10-03-2008, 02:00 PM
  #14
Trained
My mare was getting some sort of "sweet feed". It didn't have the same look as it, but that's what they called it and she was rather hot on it. But she was stalled overnight and her turn out was very small and she had no room to get rid of her extra energy.

Since moving her, she is on a pelleted sweet feed (because she is hypp NH). Maybe because it's pelleted, she doesn't get hot, I'm not sure, but she's also out 24/7 right now (until the winter time) but she's been a lot calmer than at the old place.

I personally think that if the horse doesn't get enough exercise per day, they're going to appear "hot". Yet if a horse was able to get 24/7 turn out, then they will be calmer. Imagine a dog that's been in a crate or small area all day and when you let them out, they go bonkers. But if they were not confined, they wouldn't be as bonkers.
     
    10-03-2008, 02:41 PM
  #15
Started
You wanna see the difference remove the sweet feed and put them on a forage based feed OR a ration balancer :) Mine weren't HOT on a sweet feed BUT I had rain rot, abcesses, thrush and colic on a regular basis .. since changing 1 1/2 years ago I have had only one case of rain rot actually mud fever from my 3yo standing in pond and NO OTHER ISSUES... I had a mare that coliced at least once a month on 1 1/2 lbs of feed PER DAY ...; since changing she has not coliced at all... two of my horses were abcess prone since changing NONE

Their spooks are smaller if/when they do spook which is rare anyway

Coats are healthier, feet are better, and THEY DON"T SWEAT AS MUCH LMAO .. I dont' get that yucky foamy yellow stinky sweat anymore AND I dont' have as many flies
     
    10-03-2008, 03:31 PM
  #16
Trained
I'm sure if I talked to my BO about changing foods, she'd do it, but as of right now, all my guys are doing really well on the sweet feed and Vega on the pelleted.

If and when I get my own place, I'll consider switching feeds, but if everything's working out fine now, I'm not going to switch.

Speaking about mud fever, my mare had it last winter but since moving/ switching feeds, she hasn't gotten anything...
     
    10-03-2008, 03:38 PM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by appylover31803
My mare was getting some sort of "sweet feed". It didn't have the same look as it, but that's what they called it and she was rather hot on it. But she was stalled overnight and her turn out was very small and she had no room to get rid of her extra energy.

Since moving her, she is on a pelleted sweet feed (because she is hypp NH). Maybe because it's pelleted, she doesn't get hot, I'm not sure, but she's also out 24/7 right now (until the winter time) but she's been a lot calmer than at the old place.

I personally think that if the horse doesn't get enough exercise per day, they're going to appear "hot". Yet if a horse was able to get 24/7 turn out, then they will be calmer. Imagine a dog that's been in a crate or small area all day and when you let them out, they go bonkers. But if they were not confined, they wouldn't be as bonkers.
That is entirely possible. They have him out all day but I don't think their pasture is very big, and honestly, 3 rides over the summer and occasional lunging can make any horse a little "wahoooo!" if they're getting exercise.
     
    10-03-2008, 03:47 PM
  #18
Trained
That could be why he was a bit on the crazy side. Gem and Vega don't have a large pasture to run in, but they do take walks around the pasture all the time (I'm not sure why, but they do. Must be a married horse couple thing hehe)

Montana's pasture is a bit large than Gem and Vega's. When I first went to see him he was only ridden one or two times previously in a couple years. He was on 4 scoops of sweet feed 2x a day. He wasn't crazy, but he wasn't crazy about doing any work.

Though I'm sure age, temperature and a whole bunch of other things combined go into making a horse hot as well as what they're fed.
     
    10-03-2008, 08:33 PM
  #19
Started
Depends on what the pelleted feed is... sweet feed is not recommended for horses with HYPP nor is a ration balancer
     
    10-05-2008, 07:21 PM
  #20
Weanling
It all boils down to if the horse is sensitive to NSC. Some are, some aren't. Coupled with the fact that this horse is not exercised on a daily basis could be the reason why he may be hot headed. Some horses can eat sweet feed with no problem. It will not affect there coat, mane, or anything. While others it will demolish mane, tail, coat, and hooves...making the horse look unhealthy.

Texas A&M has great research on NSC, sweet feeds, and their affects. Most of the time it's not just the sweet feed, but the combination of proper pasture grass, hay, supplements, etc. It truly is a science trying to figure out what works for individual horses. My whole herd is on something different. Pain in the butt, yes, but it's what's best for them.
     

« Herda? | Horse Diet »
Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0