symptoms of a lame horse or laminitus.....
 
 

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symptoms of a lame horse or laminitus.....

This is a discussion on symptoms of a lame horse or laminitus..... within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Syptoms of horse lameness
  • Signs of horse lameness

 
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    05-28-2008, 05:34 PM
  #1
Foal
symptoms of a lame horse or laminitus.....

Hi, im new here.

Can you tell me what symptoms I should be looking for if a horse/ pony is lame? I am about to start a share and have explained to the owner I am a better rider than horse carer, so don't know an awful lot about horse management etc. Could you please tell me what I should be look for if a horse is lame.

Thanks
     
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    05-28-2008, 05:45 PM
  #2
Yearling
Lameness in horse's can be a very difficult thing to pin point. To be honest if your not very experienced the best thing is to call a vet.

Somethings you can check for : heat or swelling anywhere on the legs or the body, such as shoulders. Cold hosing or application of Arinca can help.

Any cuts or punctures of any severity should be dealt with in conjunction with a vet.

Digital pulse, may indicate founder or even an abscess. Founder needs to be dealt with by a vet. If your farrier or vet indicates an abscess soaking in a HOT Epsom bucket will help draw it out.

I would really recommend you go out and get a general horse care book. Cherry Hill has a few out that are very informative with lots of pictures.
     
    05-28-2008, 05:50 PM
  #3
Yearling
Well that's annoying........ how do I stop the forum from putting in definitions??????
     
    05-28-2008, 05:59 PM
  #4
Foal
Ok, thank you very much. I will get a book!

I did a share for a few months but it didn't work out, the owner didn't give me a chance and the horse was ill and then got lame, I didn't pick up on the lameness, only 1/10 lame sometimes and other times was fine and now she is saying I am inexperienced which has really knocked my confidence. Of course I want to learn as much as possible and I am starting another share and have explained to the owner I am more experienced in riding than horse care but willing to learn!
     
    05-28-2008, 07:59 PM
  #5
Yearling
Good for you!!!!

Don't feel bad, we all have to start someplace. Browsing these types of forums are a great way to learn as well. I often look for titles that relate to something I have never dealt with before myself . I have a file folder at home with information that I have printed off for future reference. ( just in case)

There are several other good forums out there as well, if you would like some names send me a note.

Good luck with your new horse.
.
     
    05-30-2008, 03:39 PM
  #6
Foal
Thanks very much for your kind words. Will message you in a minute!
     
    05-30-2008, 03:43 PM
  #7
Foal
Actually, can't work out how to messahe you!
     
    05-31-2008, 08:29 PM
  #8
Weanling
There's a book called THE LAME HORSE by Dr Rooney. It's very informative and a good one to own.

Foundered horses tend to lean way back and put weight on the hind end, and once you see "walking on egg shells" you will know what it is. That's what it looks like in the acute, most painful stage.

Anytime a horse "nods" his head excessivly upon putting more weigth on a certain front foot, that can indicate pain. Frequent stumbling can be an indicator of pain sometimes, constant shifting of weight from front leg to front leg (not just stomping flies) or pointing the toe forward at rest.

If there's lameness in the hind end, it's usually more subtle. Watch the top of the hips. The sore leg will have a hip that "drops" with each weight bearing step. The leg may move forward very stiffly, or the horse may hold it up and "skip" when asked to canter.

Reluctance to move, or holding up a limb are clear indicators of something wrong.
     

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