Taking in a "special" horse
 
 

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Taking in a "special" horse

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        05-03-2010, 08:27 PM
      #1
    Yearling
    Taking in a "special" horse

    Hello! I have recently met a mare named, Money she's bred to the nines but was born um well... homely. But in her own way she is beautiful. She is seven. Sadly she is unrideable due to several "freak" aciddents that damaged her back leg she walks/jogs fine on flat ground such as sawdust or sand or even smooth grass but in mud she gets very sore and she has to get painkillers. The owner say she has been checked by a vet but I will get a second opinion. She just gave birth to a colt two days ago (I was the first one to see him). Unfortunatley after the colt is weaned she will be put down if no one takes her (chances are very slim) I am planning to talk my BO into giving her to me and I will take her home. I have the perfect paddock for her and in the winter we can close half the barn off and she can stay inside. Anyways question is should I do it? And if I do it what should I prepare for? And should I get insurance?
    Thank you
    Tasia
         
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        05-03-2010, 08:43 PM
      #2
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tasia    
    Hello! I have recently met a mare named, Money she's bred to the nines but was born um well... homely. But in her own way she is beautiful. She is seven. Sadly she is unrideable due to several "freak" aciddents that damaged her back leg she walks/jogs fine on flat ground such as sawdust or sand or even smooth grass but in mud she gets very sore and she has to get painkillers. The owner say she has been checked by a vet but I will get a second opinion. She just gave birth to a colt two days ago (I was the first one to see him). Unfortunatley after the colt is weaned she will be put down if no one takes her (chances are very slim) I am planning to talk my BO into giving her to me and I will take her home. I have the perfect paddock for her and in the winter we can close half the barn off and she can stay inside. Anyways question is should I do it? And if I do it what should I prepare for? And should I get insurance?
    Thank you
    Tasia
    Not sure why you want insurance for a horse of no value and they wouldn't cover pre existing comditions and may not even be healthy enough to get coverage so that is a mute point. If you had space and money to care for a horse like this, why not? But if she couldn't live a reasonably pain free life outdoors and not locked in a barn then it may be best she is put down. With out knowing what is wrong and how bad it is it is hard for someone else to say.
         
        05-03-2010, 08:49 PM
      #3
    Yearling
    I don't know why just out of curosity about the insurance. She could be out side 9 months out of the year and daily turn out in the winter I just mean when it gets really muddy and theres pot holes and the ground become uneven and hard for her to walk on. BTW the barn is a open space (the area she would be in is about 40'x40' Thanks for the reply!
         
        05-03-2010, 09:07 PM
      #4
    Yearling
    Poor horse! Why were they breeding her if she's so valueless/unloved? Just using her for her uterus? That makes me very sad :(

    I have pet insurance on my dog and have been MORE than happy with it. When I rescued my horse I thought I should get something similar for him but what I've learned researching online and talking to horse people is that the existing horse "health" insurance plans (at least where I live) aren't worth the premiums and can actually drop your horse after something happens!

    For instance, my mom's horse was dropped from the insurance after he ate a bike seat. Didn't need vet care or anything but they had a vet come out to check him just in case. Bam, dropped!

    The other thing is the pre-existing conditions that you and I are both stuck with with our horses. Even if we could get them insured they wouldn't cover the issues they already have.

    Before I decided to adopt my boy I thought about best and worst case scenarios. If I could get him sound, what would my plans be for him and would he be the right horse for it? For instance, he has funky confirmation in his hind legs so I could never show him, not that I want to. If he'll never be sound, worse case scenario, and can never be ridden, what will I do and at what point will we (me/vet/farrier) make that distinction.

    If you have the time and money and room for a YOUNG horse who will live a long while and you may never be able to ride then go for it and save that lovely girl!
         
        05-03-2010, 09:11 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    Thanks You! Yes it is very sad a lady takes her out of her paddock once a week and grooms her and makes her feel loved but its just not enough. I can afford surgery and medical attention by the time I get her.
         
        05-03-2010, 09:15 PM
      #6
    Yearling
    It's so kind of you to do! She'll be a very lucky horse to catch such a good break!

    Champ is gorgeous by the way! Love those palomino qhs!
         
        05-04-2010, 03:53 PM
      #7
    Green Broke
    I think you could provide her with the perfect home. Poor horsie! She needs TLC and sounds like you are the right person for her. Is she nice? You should put some pics up of her.
         
        05-04-2010, 05:49 PM
      #8
    Yearling
    Shes very sweet to me anyways I think the trust issues with other people are because they never interract with her. She is a very protective mama though. I will get some pics up ASAP.
         
        05-04-2010, 06:06 PM
      #9
    Showing
    Sorry, but I'm going to be a wet blanket to this feel-good party.

    Before you agree to take her, have her completely vetted to make sure you know exactly why her owners were planning to have her put down.

    If she has some physical issue that will require continuous medication/treatment to keep her out of pain, are you financially prepared to lay out that kind of money for many years to come?

    The mare is only 7 y/o; she could conceivably live another 15 to 25 years.

    A lot of things can happen in that long of a span. What happens if you have a life changing issue yourself? Who is going to care for the horse then?

    What kind of provisions do you plan to have in place, should you no longer be able to care for her?

    These are all things that need to be addressed before the mare sets one foot on your property.

    It's nice to think that you'll be 'helping' an animal that would have otherwise been euthanized, but sometimes euthing really is the best option if the animal is going to be in continuous pain with no hope of relief.

    Don't let your sentiments get in the way of reality. I applaud you for your soft heart, but don't let what you want get in the way of what the best option might be for the mare.
         
        05-04-2010, 06:47 PM
      #10
    Yearling
    I appreciate your input speed racer she will completly vetted and we have a retierment home set up for incase there is a problem such as life changing event. I will not have her until september and things could change I am going to talk more to her owners about her past and make a trek to the vet and see what he reccomends for her.
         

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