Teeth, pain or attitude?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Teeth, pain or attitude?

This is a discussion on Teeth, pain or attitude? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • My horses attitude has changed due to pain

Like Tree7Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    03-22-2014, 07:28 PM
  #1
Trained
Teeth, pain or attitude?

Here's a good riddle. Over the past 2 weeks, this has been getting more noticeable. Left lead canter is perfect, round engaged and he reaches into the bit. Trot both directions is metronome perfect. You could set a watch to it. As soon as we pick up the right lead canter, he starts flipping his entire head and neck not necessarily in sync with the rhythm. My very first instinct is teeth, but he just had them done a few weeks ago. I had them done when I did because I thought this was the result of some hooks on his teeth, but guess not. At the walk, if I leave the rein slack, he tosses his head to a lesser degree until I take up the slack. His bridle is new as of last November and his bit has not changed. I'm going to try adjusting the bit a little lower in his mouth tomorrow and longe him at the canter to see if he tossed his head without a bridle on. Maybe tooth abscess brewing?

I attempted to investigate the possibility of pain. His back does not appear to be sore. Today he did leg yield, shoulder-in and haunches-in at the walk in both directions. The only resistance was to shoulder-in tracking right. I'm thinking maybe sore neck since he did get a nasty bite there a few weeks ago, but would think that would be improving, not going down hill at this point. He is willingly jumping both directions, but the head tossing comes back into play any time we land on and continue on the right lead.

Lastly attitude. We have been jumping higher, and I have been asking much much more of him at the canter over the past few months. He has a club foot on his right front, and I know that lead is more difficult for him. Is it possible I just need to send him more forward? I've been reluctant to do just that in case it really is some result of pain. I don't want to aggravate the situation if it's not in his head.

Vet is coming this week for shots, so I guess I will be budgeting more $$ now for the visit. He's getting a massage soon in case it's just tight muscles. Any ideas of what's going on here?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    03-22-2014, 07:33 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Could still be a teeth issue. I had a horse done and right after he started tossing his head. Took him to a dentist and had a "proper" float and then he was fine.
May also need a chiro adjustment.
Take each hind leg and lift it high to the side, like a dog taking a pee. If one goes easily up higher than the other than a chiro is needed and he is in pain.
     
    03-22-2014, 07:38 PM
  #3
Trained
My confusion on the teeth is, why just one direction? If it was on one side of his mouth, I would think the head tossing would stop when we were traveling straight.
     
    03-22-2014, 08:23 PM
  #4
Trained
Definitely a physical problem IMO, whether actual pain, imbalance, whatever. If he was fine until a couple of weeks ago, I'd be thinking pain, whether sudden & 'accidental' or progression of imbalance issues has led to it. What did you do to assess his back was OK? What about elsewhere on his body? How symmetrical is he, aside from his hoof? How 'clubby' is his hoof? How's the saddle? Is it fitted to allow for the asymmetry? How about how you ride? Are you balanced?
stevenson likes this.
     
    03-22-2014, 08:35 PM
  #5
Trained
Actually it's not "definitely" pain. This is a horse who used to fake a limp when riding in the ring so his mom (that would be me) would give up on real work and take him out into the hay fields so he could run around and have fun.

He does the same thing in both his forward flap jump saddle and dressage saddle, so I don't think it is saddle related.

I have palpitated up and down his back, curried as hard as I could to try to evoke a response and he does not flinch. Vet said just a few months ago, that he sees so many horses with sore back, but mine is not one of them.

I've been riding the same way for years, so I'm not sure how that would suddenly create a problem.

His club is very mild grade. Gotta look hard to notice it. His left hip bone is slightly higher than the right, but again, why would that suddenly become a problem.

I'm still thinking teeth.
     
    03-22-2014, 11:31 PM
  #6
Super Moderator
If it is teeth, then why would he be perfet trotting either direction, and only "off" CANTERing going right. I think it must be in his right front foot, which takes the whole weight for one beat fo the canter cycle., where as during the trot, it is always balanced by it's diagonal partner.
Wallaby and stevenson like this.
     
    03-22-2014, 11:42 PM
  #7
Showing
Horses often have a level of pain tolerance. He may truly be fine without the weight of a rider and tack, yet his level of tolerance is reduced because of additional weight. The reason he doesn't show lameness in the pasture is because he's the one a predator would pick out as being a weaker on to go after. The horse is capable of temporarily shutting down the pain so it appears strong and fleet of foot. Athletes do this but for different reasons.
     
    03-23-2014, 12:32 AM
  #8
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
Horses often have a level of pain tolerance. He may truly be fine without the weight of a rider and tack, yet his level of tolerance is reduced because of additional weight. The reason he doesn't show lameness in the pasture is because he's the one a predator would pick out as being a weaker on to go after. The horse is capable of temporarily shutting down the pain so it appears strong and fleet of foot. Athletes do this but for different reasons.
As I said in my OP, every other gait and direction is perfect under saddle. There are zero signs on lameness. He goes from an absolutely fantastic left lead canter to this head shaking mess on the right. The canter itself is fine. It's just accompanied with the neck/head shaking. The head shaking is not in sync with the canter steps, so it does not appear to be weighting related. It really does seem like something is just catching him in his mouth. I will get some video when I get a chance.
     
    03-23-2014, 01:27 AM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
Actually it's not "definitely" pain. This is a horse who used to fake a limp
Well won't comment here on 'faking' lameness, but you may notice I didn't actually say 'definitely pain'(although sounds highly likely), I said definitely physical - as in not 'faking' or 'attitude'.

Quote:
He does the same thing in both his forward flap jump saddle and dressage saddle, so I don't think it is saddle related.
I don't understand why you'd conclude they must be OK from that though? Could they not be both the same?(Eg. They're symmetrical & he's not?) Even if not, could one have caused a problem that carries over?? You need to evaluate saddle fit carefully & check it regularly, as saddles & horses both change over time.

Quote:
I have palpitated up and down his back, curried as hard as I could to try to evoke a response and he does not flinch. Vet said just a few months ago, that he sees so many horses with sore back, but mine is not one of them.
No offense but if you're not an experienced bodyworker, fact that you have 'palpated' doesn't mean anything necessarily. Perhaps he doesn't have obvious bruises, but something is out... Vets, unless specialised in bodywork often don't know that much either. **Not assuming it's the case, just not assuming you or vet experts there either.

Quote:
I've been riding the same way for years, so I'm not sure how that would suddenly create a problem.
Could be, if you have a sore knee or some such lately, or could be that combined with his imbalance or something he's done recently...

Quote:
His club is very mild grade. Gotta look hard to notice it. His left hip bone is slightly higher than the right, but again, why would that suddenly become a problem.
You may have noticed, in yourself perhaps, that you can function perfectly well with imbalances for ages, but then 'suddenly' perhaps 'out of the blue' or due to a minor accident, twist, jolt or such, suddenly what hass been ignored for years hurts. Have you had a chiro vet or such out to check him out? What have bodyworkers had to say about his pelvic imbalance?

Quote:
I'm still thinking teeth.
So if it's teeth, it's definitely due to pain. But what makes you think that, when you've had the dentist recently(you didn't tell us he gave a bad report so I assume it was OK?), that he does it on a loose rein, that he only does it at a canter??

Quote:
every other gait and direction is perfect under saddle
Is his high foot the right? Could be a little lameness in that hoof, exacerbated when you ask him to use it like that. That an unrecognised problem has progressed to mild lameness. Also any imbalances/pressure points in a saddle are felt 3 times stronger(they did tests with pressure pads) at the canter as at other paces.
     
    03-23-2014, 01:36 AM
  #10
Green Broke
I would concur pain related as the horse only reacts to the canter on the right. He is telling you something is wrong.
loosie likes this.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wisdom teeth out, bored and on pain killers Klassic Superstar General Off Topic Discussion 4 01-23-2013 04:43 AM
Question regarding teeth and teeth floating! Klassic Superstar Horse Health 2 10-29-2012 02:06 PM
Pain in my teeth from "Accident" with young horse. SorrelHorse Rider Wellness 20 11-01-2011 06:53 PM
Hopping Horse-Pain or Attitude? BrokenBit Horse Training 7 05-03-2011 07:42 PM
Teeth pain causes rearing? PrettyHorse Horse Training 4 05-18-2007 11:42 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0