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Tennessee Walkers and hip dysplasia?

This is a discussion on Tennessee Walkers and hip dysplasia? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • HORSE WITH hip dysplasia
  • What is hip dysplasia in horses

 
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    02-13-2008, 02:41 PM
  #21
Started
Yes, I tend to agree...but to each his own, I suppose. The big lick isn't the only type of extreme horsemanship that just makes me say "uh...what now?" :)
     
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    02-13-2008, 02:45 PM
  #22
Started
So then the platforms are why their hind ends are so collected under them?
     
    02-13-2008, 02:48 PM
  #23
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harlee rides horses
So then the platforms are why their hind ends are so collected under them?
Well, if you watch a flat shod class, you can still see the same type of action in the hind end; Walkers do really have a unique way of traveling. The platforms just amplify it.

Ed. Here's a little clip I found of a Walker going flat shod...a little slower so you can really see how they go in the back.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPCV4AMKvgo
     
    02-13-2008, 02:50 PM
  #24
Started
And the platforms are used as weights too? Not like I would ever try it but basically I could put those on a Qh and get the same movements somewhat?
     
    02-13-2008, 02:54 PM
  #25
Trained
If I was going to by a TWH and saw it one day with the platforms, i'd just pass it by, but if I saw the same horse without them, i'd consider it.

Do all TWHs do the head bobbing thing?
     
    02-13-2008, 02:56 PM
  #26
Started
I think they do it to help pick their legs up, like have you ever lifted something really heavy up and had to move your head to pick it up? I would assume it's something like that.
     
    02-13-2008, 02:59 PM
  #27
Trained
I understand that, but I think it takes away from looking at the horse. Instead of looking at their gait, im always looking at their bobbing head
     
    02-13-2008, 03:01 PM
  #28
Started
Mmm...I don't really know. I suppose so. The gaited breeds have a typical conformation that really allows and encourages a higher step. If you are talking quarter horses, you might get a similar effect from weights, but its not going to be as pronounced, because they just aren't usually built to travel like that.

Lord knows, I'm no saddleseat expert: you just learn some of it by default if you grow up with horses in the south:P I know there are a few saddleseat riders on the forum who would know better than I.

In the Friesian breed, they sometimes train with lead-filled ankle boots to get more height. They also use a device similar to the ankle chains seen with saddleseat horses; they are made of leather with rings on them. But these are never used in shows: they are training devices only.
     
    02-13-2008, 03:02 PM
  #29
Started
Yeah I have seen chains before.
     
    02-13-2008, 03:05 PM
  #30
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by appylover31803
I understand that, but I think it takes away from looking at the horse. Instead of looking at their gait, im always looking at their bobbing head
Haha, yeah, the Walkers bob their heads a lot: its considered a good thing.
     

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