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Are there ways to improve tripping?

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  • How does one tell the difference between a trained horse and a tripped horse in movies
  • Horse tripping stumbling hindquarters

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    06-02-2013, 08:43 PM
  #11
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
At her age & considering what you've noticed, I think you're on the right track except for doing circles & stuff with her *unless advised by a bodyworker*. Most certainly a well fitting saddle that doesn't pinch her is a start, as well as not over tightening the girth. I'd get a good practitioner to come give her a treatment & advise you whether there's any damage from badly fitting saddles that needs to heal before saddling her again.

Hoof care is probably no 1 issue with tripping - long toes, high heels, thrush or otherwise weak heels, thin soles, etc. I imagine she's a no. 1 candidate for most of those, being a shown TWH who's owners cared to sore her. Dentistry/bit problems can also cause problems such as tripping, not to mention the hands on the reins.
Thrush - check
Weak heels - check (her thrush was mainly in her heels)
Thin soles - check (Durasole and Keratex have improved this a lot)

Dentistry/bit/hands on reins... interesting. Probably not the problem, since she's been recently floated, and I'm very light on the reins, but I'm very curious. I never would have thought. Will you please elaborate? I assume it has to do with carrying the head in a way to avoid the bit, which then hollows the back and causes poor movement of the legs?
     
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    06-04-2013, 12:21 AM
  #12
Foal
I have found that long toes/low heels adds to tripping, joint pain (try the bute suggestion and supplements), bad saddle fit or position that restricts shoulder movement, not engaging hindquarters or otherwise poor collection or muscle development... She might have any one of these problems..the solution to start with is to try to rule them out one by one. She sounds like she can really benefit from some of the above suggestions by the other posters. This may sound different, but I had been advised in the past to have a dressage trainer come and work with my horse to help him carry himself better since he tripped and was very heavy on the forehand. I was not able to do this but it sounded like a good suggestion.

Hope you can something or a combination of things to help her out :) !
freia likes this.
     
    06-04-2013, 01:10 AM
  #13
Yearling
Possibly not related, but my boy does quite a bit of tripping. He drags his feet out of laziness, or so I believe. He was a school horse, and was ridden around in circles for years. When I do anything vaguely similar to that, he gets lazy, so I walk him over obstacles and make him pick them up. I'll also throw in some random circles etc to keep it interesting, and if he trips too badly I'll play a little on the reins to make him pay attention.

Out on the trails, I think he's tripped maybe twice because he's been distracted by horses in paddocks nearby. He loves being out and about, so his laziness disappears completely.

Your mare does sound more of a sore case though. I'm looking forward to hearing what works for you and her, as my boy is getting on in years and I wouldn't be surprised if arthritis started giving him troubles.
     
    06-04-2013, 05:05 AM
  #14
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by freia    
Dentistry/bit/hands on reins... interesting. Probably not the problem, since she's been recently floated, and I'm very light on the reins, but I'm very curious. I never would have thought. Will you please elaborate?
Sorry but can't really elaborate, just that I've heard bodyworkers say that jaw/teeth probs can cause stumbling & co ordination issues. Perhaps someone here has more info. But yeah, without more info, I'd be thinking it's not the likeliest answer anyway. Have you tried her in boots, to protect her tender feet?
     
    06-04-2013, 12:02 PM
  #15
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Sorry but can't really elaborate, just that I've heard bodyworkers say that jaw/teeth probs can cause stumbling & co ordination issues. Perhaps someone here has more info. But yeah, without more info, I'd be thinking it's not the likeliest answer anyway. Have you tried her in boots, to protect her tender feet?
She doesn't show any tenderness on firm and smooth or soft and smooth surfaces. She is VERY tender on gravel, and we do use boots then. Interesting when you mention it. I don't think she's tripped with me when wearing her boots. I;m going to have to try that test a few more times and see if its consistent.
Doodlesweaver likes this.
     
    06-04-2013, 05:47 PM
  #16
Green Broke
Just a thought... Big Lick horses are generally trimmed with very long toes, so if the current farrier is still trimming her "like a show horse" or "like a TWH" then long toes are very likely the culprit. If you think this is possible you could take a few pictures and post them here (or in the Hoof Care subforum) to get an opinion. A good side shot of the front hooves from ground level would probably be enough to tell if that's the problem.
loosie likes this.
     
    06-04-2013, 07:14 PM
  #17
Trained
^^That.
     
    06-04-2013, 07:34 PM
  #18
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by verona1016    
Just a thought... Big Lick horses are generally trimmed with very long toes, so if the current farrier is still trimming her "like a show horse" or "like a TWH" then long toes are very likely the culprit. If you think this is possible you could take a few pictures and post them here (or in the Hoof Care subforum) to get an opinion. A good side shot of the front hooves from ground level would probably be enough to tell if that's the problem.
I trimmed these pics off of some pictures I had of my daughter riding her. Hope it shows something.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg hoof1.jpg (32.5 KB, 27 views)
File Type: jpg hoof2.jpg (44.9 KB, 27 views)
File Type: jpg hoof3.jpg (64.4 KB, 27 views)
File Type: jpg hoof4.jpg (44.7 KB, 27 views)
     
    06-04-2013, 08:08 PM
  #19
Showing
Well, I think it's safe to say that long toes are not part of her problem.

My best guess? It's likely a combination of arthritis and the fact that she was likely never ridden in anything other than an arena for much of her younger life. Like Cherie said, horses only ridden in arenas or nice flat areas with no obstacles often just don't learn how to watch where their feet are at. I can almost always tell the difference between a "flat-land" horse and a horse who's seen some rough country just by the way they handle their feet.

I'd start her on some sort of joint supplement to help with the arthritis, then I'd start working her slowly over rougher country with hills and deadfalls...places where she has to pay attention to her feet.

At her age, she may not improve, but it's worth a shot. She looks like an absolute doll.

Oh, and of course, the ill-fitting tack doesn't help at all. I'd be having a conversation with the owner about her saddle and the effect is has on the mare.
Skyseternalangel and freia like this.
     
    06-04-2013, 09:46 PM
  #20
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by freia    
Are there ways to improve tripping?
Long toes, improper shoeing, uneven ground, improper diet, poor health -- lots of ways to "improve tripping." Sorry, but I couldn't resist -when I read the title I thought, "Why in blazes would anyone want to IMPROVE tripping?"

Good luck, though. There is lots of good, serious advice from people here, so nevermind my sarcasm... treat the arthritis and give her a place to think about where and how she places her feet. If you don't have rough areas available, make some of your own with deadfall, trotting poles, tires... whatever you can find that doesn't have sharp points or places she can get her feet stuck.
     

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