Update on my gelding... it was an abcsess (pics) - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Update on my gelding... it was an abcsess (pics)

This is a discussion on Update on my gelding... it was an abcsess (pics) within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        10-04-2009, 08:27 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    [quote=loosie;419917]Yes, it is a common spot for an abscess to blow out. But qtrhrs, you misunderstand the term 'gravel'. It doesn't mean that actual gravel has somehow got into the hoof at all. 'Gravel' is just an antiquated term for an abscess, usually one that breaks at the coronet. Quote]

    Thanks for clearing that up!
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        10-04-2009, 08:44 PM
      #12
    Foal
    Epson salt soak is a good idea. Make sure you get the entire area in the water. My mare had an abcess and we soaked it while she ate.

    After it starts to drain you can put iodine on it after the soaking.
         
        10-04-2009, 08:48 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Epson salt soaks never bothered my mare.....if horses could only talk we would know for sure. But it is a simple effective treatment so give it a try.
         
        10-05-2009, 11:59 AM
      #14
    Started
    I've always heard that the rings on a horses hoof are often caused by a change in their feed schedule... like if they go from one feed to a really rich feed...

    I've recently changed my horses feed from a regular sweet feed to plain alfalfa pellets... the rings in his hoof only started after the switch and both my nieghbor and my farrier said it was normal and fine.
         
        10-05-2009, 04:34 PM
      #15
    Foal
    I can't claim to know this to be a fact but my gelding had a bad case of colic and nearly died, afterwards he developed a ring around his hoof. I have been told it is result of illness/fever or lameness. It is good you changed from the sweet food (we did the same) as the sweeter food is more likely to cause lamintis and colic. We also are using an alfalfa based feed and have had good luck with it.
         
        10-05-2009, 04:37 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    You may want to get some animalintex and put a small patch of it on and wrap it in vetwrap. This will keep it clean when he is out moving around and such, and the aminalintex will draw out anything left. You can see on the pad every day if anything has been drawn out or not.

    And that's awesome it was an absess and not something broke!
         
        10-05-2009, 11:00 PM
      #17
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Britt    
    I've always heard that the rings on a horses hoof are often caused by a change in their feed schedule... like if they go from one feed to a really rich feed...
    Yes, metabolic upsets due to a change in feed, not only, but especially when involving a 'rich' feed, can cause lami too.

    Quote:
    I've recently changed my horses feed from a regular sweet feed to plain alfalfa pellets... the rings in his hoof only started after the switch and both my nieghbor and my farrier said it was normal and fine.
    Depends what the rings look like as to whether 'growth rings' are OK & normal(well, lami rings are normal for many horses...) or not. If they're just lines, or very faint ridges or dents then they may just be growth rings. If they're ridgy - that is, the hoof wall isn't flat, they're likely signs of lami. Hooves may also be flared - not straight from hairline to ground surface, which indicates the walls have become separated. The well connected part of the hoof can often be seen in the top half inch or so down from the hairline & then the walls flare away from there.

    Most horses I've seen that are on 'rich' feeds have some degree or other of laminitis(that is, inflammation/weakening of the laminae as opposed to founder - the mechanical results). If there're ridges in the rings at around the time you switched feeds, it's likely the better attached growth beginning to come down. If you're seeing more ridges since then - that is, higher up - then there's likely something not right there. Possibly to do with how you feed(only a guess)? Feeding small portions in as many meals a day is always preferable, and even less 'rich' feed can cause probs if fed too infrequently in large portions.
         
        10-06-2009, 08:20 AM
      #18
    Yearling

    this may be helpful::

    "First, the rings themselves do not appear to cause the horse any harm. They are indicators of changes that have occurred during the normal routine of its life.
    They are sometimes called stress rings or stress indicators because one of the reasons they appear is when the horse experiences a period of increased stress in its life.
    Hoof rings may result from something traumatic such as a serious illness or injury or something as simple as a seasonal change in diet. Moving a horse from one pasture to another or from one stable to another is sometimes all it takes for rings to form.
    The only time I really worry about hoof rings is when the ends of the rings drop down uniformly a considerable distance as they come around the hoof and reach the heels. Laminitis and/or founder will sometimes produce rings that drop down at the heels.
    Quite often, you can determine the cause of the rings by figuring out when they would have first formed. Assuming it takes approximately one year for a hoof to replace itself, then if the rings appear midway down a recently trimmed hoof, a check of your records from six months ago may give an indication of a change in your horse’s routine.
    There is nothing you can do to make them go away once they appear other than to use sandpaper or a sanding block to smooth them out. However, I do not recommend this as they cause the horse no harm and I don’t think using an abrasive on any hoof is a good idea. You are bound to remove some of the natural protective covering that Mother Nature has provided and as the saying goes, “It’s not nice (or wise) to fool with Mother Nature.”
    Therefore, it is good that you noticed them and while they are definitely something to look for during a pre-purchase inspection, they are a very common occurrence and your farrier should be able to tell you if they represent anything serious."
         
        10-06-2009, 10:23 PM
      #19
    Trained
    Hey AlmagroN, do you know who that quote came from please?
         
        10-07-2009, 08:21 AM
      #20
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    Hey AlmagroN, do you know who that quote came from please?
    crap, I forgot to post the source, I have to go back and look for it again! Lol

    Here is a link to the page http://www.antelopepress.com/Q%20&%20A.htm

    Here is a link to that direct quote:
    http://www.antelopepress.com/hoof%20injuries.htm#My horse has rings on his hooves. I never noticed them before and wonder what causes them and if there is something I should do to make them go away?

    Don't CLICK ON SECOND LINK. Copy and paste all of the text after http://. for some reason the whole thing wont show up as a link, but if you click on only the clickable link, it wont take you to the right place.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Update and more pics of Ben =) belgianlover Draft Horses 14 03-11-2009 09:46 AM
    Update with pics My2Geldings Horse Pictures 6 02-03-2009 02:26 AM
    Brickens Update and Pics mudypony Horse Pictures 20 10-27-2008 06:18 PM
    New pics of Sonny :D and an update on him :) SonnyWimps Horse Pictures 10 10-26-2008 12:18 PM
    *UPDATE* Pics of Janie Belle! horse_luver4e Horse Pictures 5 09-06-2007 01:21 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:03 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0