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  • Can hobbles be used when vet comes?

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    06-06-2013, 10:06 PM
  #21
Green Broke
Nothing more constructive to say, the others have it pretty much covered...

But your horse sounds like me! It used to take 4 people to hold me as a kid, then they would trick me (slam a door or pass the needle around the back and poke me). Now I just shake, cry, and jump. I went to the dentist to get a small filling done (she probably could of done it w/o novocaine) and I was still panicky on 0.5mg of Xanax plus 20 minutes of breathing nitrous like I was huffing paint. Everyone tells me to knock it off, relax, don't look, etc.... Ain't going to happen. If I were you horse, I'd need the works! If I could control myself I would, but sometimes my sense of fear goes beyond my sense of control. I couldn't imagine how that must feel as a prey animal.
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    06-06-2013, 10:17 PM
  #22
Green Broke
I had a mare that was a dream to handle, she was an amazing horse, anybody could do anything with her. She taught dozens of kids to ride, she was calm, respectful, never put a foot out of line. The vet could show up, look her all over, touch her all over, stick her arm down either end if she wanted, but as soon as the needles came out, it was as if someone flipped a switch. It was honestly Jekyl and Hyde. After quite a few battles, and only specifically over shots or blood draws, the vet and I discovered that if she simply walked alongside us as we were walking around the arena, and gave the shots or drew blood in transit, the mare was fine. Luckily I had a great vet that was willing to collaborate with me, instead of insisting on a twitch or a chain. In this mare's case, it was honest terror of the needle. But often it IS a handling issue. The mare also had a set of scars on her butt that made her look like frankenstien, which she had before we got her. It was obviously a "home repair job", as the scars from the stitches looked like a railroad track. I often wonder if she was stitched up without sedative and that set up her terror of needles. She also had to have colic surgery when she was older, she gave a vet student a concussion because they didn't believe us when we told them beware of her around needles, the student got slammed into the stocks as she was trying to administer a shot. They told us the same thing. Even in severe pain (our vet had sedated her prior to going to the vet school) she was as compliant as any horse they had ever seen, until that needle came out.

My point is, yes, most of the time it is a hole in training, but sometimes there is an exception that makes the rule, and a little thinking outside the box can go a long way.
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    06-06-2013, 10:22 PM
  #23
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlideStop    
Nothing more constructive to say, the others have it pretty much covered...

But your horse sounds like me! It used to take 4 people to hold me as a kid, then they would trick me (slam a door or pass the needle around the back and poke me). Now I just shake, cry, and jump. I went to the dentist to get a small filling done (she probably could of done it w/o novocaine) and I was still panicky on 0.5mg of Xanax plus 20 minutes of breathing nitrous like I was huffing paint. Everyone tells me to knock it off, relax, don't look, etc.... Ain't going to happen. If I were you horse, I'd need the works! If I could control myself I would, but sometimes my sense of fear goes beyond my sense of control. I couldn't imagine how that must feel as a prey animal.
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I have had the same thing happen to me! Now as an adult I just choose not to get needles but my horses DO
     
    06-06-2013, 10:24 PM
  #24
Showing
Google Scotch hobbles. A loop of rope tied with a bowline knot goes around the horse's neck. Another rope goes around the horse's ankle and thro the neck loop and the leg is drawn up maybe 6". The horse is swing his leg as he tries to set it down. Wait until he's standing quietly before releasing the rope. Practise this until it's second nature to both of you. He's not going to go too far when the vet comes. The more he kicks the tied leg the more it jerks on his neck. It's amazing what you can do to a horse when it's back leg is out of commission.
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    06-06-2013, 10:29 PM
  #25
Started
I know this is probably a very stupid question but what about blindfolding him?
     
    06-06-2013, 10:34 PM
  #26
Super Moderator
I have used Scotch Hobbles a lot and have 2 big soft cotton Scotch ropes now. I prefer 4 way hobbles. I have seen more than one horse crippled by Scotching up a hind leg. One of the crippled ones crippled himself because he would not tolerate clippers. He tried to attack the person holding them. The guy Scotched him, he threw himself and permanently injured something high in the hind leg or hip that was Scotched. I have had several horses throw themselves with 4 way hobbles, but have never seen one injured. I am sure it can happen, but if a horse cannot be handled and is dangerous with ordinary means, then they get 4-way hobbles or laid down. Usually an experienced person on a lip chain can get a horse over the needle thing.

And yes, blind-folding one can work. But, it is very dangerous as they can run over someone or hurt themselves if they do not 'freeze' when they are blind-folded. Some freeze and some don't.
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    06-06-2013, 10:43 PM
  #27
Weanling
Are stocks of some sort not an option?
     
    06-06-2013, 10:54 PM
  #28
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbcrazy    
Are stocks of some sort not an option?
No I don't have stocks :/ I think having him in his stall will maybe be the best option. My stalls are 10'X12' so there is plenty of room
     
    06-06-2013, 10:56 PM
  #29
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexS    
Then knock the snot out of him, and take back control.

.
And "knocking the snot" out of a horse that is already scared crapless of the vet will only serve to confirm his fears instead of having him see that the vet isn't all that bad
     
    06-06-2013, 11:16 PM
  #30
Green Broke
Do NOT have the vet work with him in the stall. That's askin to be rammed up against a wall. Your vet doesn't have a clinic to haul him to? He should have a stock there.
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Tags
calm, scared, shots, tranquilizers, vet

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