Wacky Farrier Advice - Page 3 - The Horse Forum

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 29 Old 12-30-2010, 10:12 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: In a land far far away, or so I wish.
Posts: 12,825
• Horses: 0
If your horse had a history of having feet that did fine with out a shorter trimming schedule (well balanced self trimming foot) then I would say no worries. There are horses that can do this (though they are far rarer than people seem to think, lots of people who say their horses are fine are fooling themselves).

Since you do not have this history with your horse I would be worried.

I like the idea of calling at six or eight weeks and expressing your concern and see if they can be done sooner. Offer a tip or extra money.
Alwaysbehind is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 29 Old 12-30-2010, 07:32 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Australia
Posts: 12,546
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by wheeler4x4 View Post
It depends on the horse. My pony only gets trimmed about once a year, and my horse only gets trimmed about 3-4 times a year. They both just have strong hooves.
Wow, it seems there are a lot more people around who's horses are in an ideal 'self trimming' environment than I would have thought, *assuming* that their horses truly don't need doing more frequently. Even up north in limestone country here, healthy hoofed domestics free roaming on big stations don't tend to get enough exercise to do that fully. It only seems to be the desert horses, who have to roam far & wide for food that wear their hooves naturally.
loosie is offline  
post #23 of 29 Old 01-01-2011, 12:36 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: St.Louis, Missouri
Posts: 550
• Horses: 1
I think it all depends on the horse. It took my gelding 3 months to need his feet done. I actually switched farriers because the one I was using wanted every 8 weeks and that was too soon for my horse, I also found out that original farrier was doing nothing to correct my horses hooves and had hind feet on his front. I would search heavily to get a second farriernion.
Posted via Mobile Device
Kymbadina is offline  
post #24 of 29 Old 01-01-2011, 01:04 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Washington, USA.
Posts: 6,634
• Horses: 2
As everyone else said, I would just call when you want him done. It wouldn't hurt to find another farrier or get a number for one just in case she really is a little weirdo and refuses. Good luck!

"Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds."
riccil0ve is offline  
post #25 of 29 Old 01-01-2011, 06:35 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Australia
Posts: 12,546
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kymbadina View Post
I actually switched farriers because the one I was using wanted every 8 weeks and that was too soon for my horse, I also found out that original farrier was doing nothing to correct my horses hooves and had hind feet on his front.
It's great if people get themselves well educated & unfortunately there are some farriers out there that don't keep up with their learning as well, so perhaps you do indeed know better than the first farrier. Perhaps your horse is 'well travelled' enough that he wears his own feet perfectly well? But if it's due to your horse's feet being so slow growing I would bet there is something seriously wrong there. Also you say they need 'correcting'(what do you mean by back feet on fronts?). One important factor in rehabbing is frequent, little & often trimming & so I suspect your first farrier was more likely closer to the schedule your horse truly needs(he may have even told you 8 weeks because he guessed that would be the minimum time you'd be willing to pay for).

As someone pointed out, sure, some horses(with very healthy feet & perfectly balanced motion, who cover many miles a day on rough terrain) do indeed require very infrequent trims, but they're not at all common & many people who believe their horses are fine with little trimming are quite incorrect. But like I said, not assuming you're one of them - your horse may well have that ideal lifestyle & management.
loosie is offline  
post #26 of 29 Old 01-01-2011, 06:42 PM Thread Starter
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Missoula, MT
Posts: 6,594
• Horses: 1
I think the second half of your reply was directed at me, loosie.
I will be having the farrier come in when they need to be done, not in May and I have a back up farrier if she decides not to come.
Spastic_Dove is offline  
post #27 of 29 Old 01-01-2011, 07:36 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: St.Louis, Missouri
Posts: 550
• Horses: 1
We just got him in september and his shoes were too small and crooked. I don't know how long they were like that. I had his feet trimmed and new shoes put on the first week in october. I by default used the farrier everyone in my barn used. He told me the shoes were to small and crooked. Then about a month ago I got a second oppinion by the farrier who does the majority of the horses in the basement barn. He said I needed to wait on a trim truste him because I've worked with him in the past. After talking with him and the vet I switched Gunnar's feed to gro'n win instead of the barn grain that everyone elses horse did well on but made mine fat and really pigheaded So it's possible that he wasn't getting the correct nutrients which is another reason I switched feeds. My current farrier showed me his heels and that one was angleing inwards I'll try getting some pictures. I've had him checked by the vet and he's on a worming routine so everything is fine now. The gro 'n win has abiotin so I'm hoping his feet will grow a little more quickly. Also, he's shod in front to help his heel have support. When the ground is softer we are going to hot shoe him with a custom shjoeshoe to help pull his heel out so that it goes straight down instead of growing in
Posted via Mobile Device
Kymbadina is offline  
post #28 of 29 Old 01-01-2011, 07:46 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: St.Louis, Missouri
Posts: 550
• Horses: 1
We just got him in september and his shoes were too small and crooked. I don't know how long they were like that. I had his feet trimmed and new shoes put on the first week in october. I by default used the farrier everyone in my barn used. He told me the shoes were to small and crooked. Then about a month ago I got a second oppinion by the farrier who does the majority of the horses in the basement barn. He said I needed to wait on a trim truste him because I've worked with him in the past. After talking with him and the vet I switched Gunnar's feed to gro'n win instead of the barn grain that everyone elses horse did well on but made mine fat and really pigheaded So it's possible that he wasn't getting the correct nutrients which is another reason I switched feeds. My current farrier showed me his heels and that one was angleing inwards I'll try getting some pictures. I've had him checked by the vet and he's on a worming routine so everything is fine now. The gro 'n win has abiotin so I'm hoping his feet will grow a little more quickly. Also, he's shod in front to help his heel have support. When the ground is softer we are going to hot shoe him with a custom shjoeshoe to help pull his heel out so that it goes straight down instead of growing in
Posted via Mobile Device
Kymbadina is offline  
post #29 of 29 Old 01-02-2011, 01:16 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Australia
Posts: 12,546
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kymbadina View Post
We just got him in september and his shoes were too small and crooked. I don't know how long they were like that. I had his feet trimmed and new shoes put on the first week in october.
As I've said many times, I'm all for people making their own decisions, but it's important to make *educated* decisions, rather than just following some 'experts' advice. In that regard I can only give my own opinions.

If a horse is kept shod, especially if there are problems, I don't think it's healthy for them to go much past 6 weeks max without resetting, even if there's little actual length to come off. But if a horse has hoof problems I seriously think they're generally far better unshod, at least until health can be restored.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kymbadina View Post
The gro 'n win has abiotin so I'm hoping his feet will grow a little more quickly. Also, he's shod in front to help his heel have support. When the ground is softer we are going to hot shoe him with a custom shjoeshoe to help pull his heel out so that it goes straight down instead of growing in
Gro n win sounds like it has a good balance of nutrients in it. Biotin is just one of many important nutrients for hoof health & one that is actually rarely lacking in a horse's diet tho. They should get enough in their diet if they get adequate green forage - legume grass/hay, for eg, of which it sounds like that product is primarily designed to be fed with. I would personally choose a ration balancer/supp that didn't include grain, particularly corn in it though.

I don't believe conventional shoes actually 'support' anything, let alone 'underslung'(I'm guessing that's what you mean) heels. I think good trimming combined with support for *the base* of the feet - frog/sole is what is needed. His heels don't need 'pulling' back, but need to be relieved of pressure so they are *allowed* to grow straight.
loosie is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to become a farrier farmerjeff Horse Grooming 23 09-29-2010 08:59 PM
Mad at new farrier Arksly Horse Health 41 07-23-2010 08:16 PM
How do I tell my farrier... eventerdrew Horse Talk 11 05-24-2010 09:20 PM
Berdi needs a farrier - advice please! Equus_girl Horse Health 6 04-07-2010 11:20 PM
Tacky makes him wacky! justice Horse Tack and Equipment 9 05-26-2008 09:27 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome