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what do you think of sweet feed?

This is a discussion on what do you think of sweet feed? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Will horse be less hyper with no sweet feed
  • Apple cider vinegar mixed with sweet feed for horses

 
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    10-08-2008, 08:39 AM
  #11
Started
Beet pulp is not a sweet feed

To indentify a sweet feed look for things like Corn, oats, barley and molasses :) although the rate of each is what matters..
     
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    10-08-2008, 09:35 AM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzyrider    
is beet pulp a sweetfeed? Sorry to interrupt but I was just curious because sweet feed isnt common here in australia and I have just started using easibeet from the you.k. Im not sure if its what is considered sweet feed or not
No, sweet feed is a textured feed (whole grains, sometimes mixed with pellets) that is covered in molasses. As long as the beet pulp doesn't contain any molasses (or much of any), it's a fine thing to feed. It works well for horses who need more weight or if your hay is running low. It's quite high in fiber and has a decent protein content (9-11% is the average for beet pulp produced here in the states).
     
    10-08-2008, 09:36 AM
  #13
Green Broke
Beet pulp is actually good for adding weight without the sugary buzz

As far as sweet feed goes, I know several barns where this is the staple - - some of the barns are bigtime show barns, where the horses are only out to groom and ride...others have their horses out all of the time - Everyone seems to handle the sweetfeed A-OK. Why fix what isn't broke??

Grains like oats and corn and barley have their drawbacks, too - -very high starch levels, and they also have a lot of sugar (not equivelant to that of molasses, but hey )

My guys are on a beet-pulp based senior grain...when they were younger, they were both on a dry pellet - - also beet pulp based
     
    10-08-2008, 10:55 AM
  #14
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaintHorseMares    
Our mares get only one cup a day of sweet feed in addition to free choice hay and they have never had a problem.

This is what we do with our geldings too. They get a trivial amount of sweet feed 2 cups each mixed with Apple Cider Vinegar. Then they are on 24/7 pasture and get free choice hay in the winters. Haven't had a problem with it. *knock on wood*
     
    10-08-2008, 11:14 AM
  #15
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dumas'_Grrrl    
This is what we do with our geldings too. They get a trivial amount of sweet feed 2 cups each mixed with Apple Cider Vinegar. Then they are on 24/7 pasture and get free choice hay in the winters. Haven't had a problem with it. *knock on wood*
Small amounts like that are generally no problem. It's when you feed to the bag's recommendation for the full nutritional value, or any amount over 3lbs a day, that you can end up with issues.
     
    10-08-2008, 11:34 AM
  #16
Started
Also when feeding that small of amount you need ot add a vitamin/mineral supplement to ensure optional health to the animal...
     
    10-08-2008, 08:00 PM
  #17
Trained
Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peggysue    
Beet pulp is not a sweet feed

To indentify a sweet feed look for things like Corn, oats, barley and molasses :) although the rate of each is what matters..

So basically sweet feeds are hot feeds?
     
    10-08-2008, 08:02 PM
  #18
Started
Yes sweet feeds can and do cause some horses to be hot and in fact if you remove all the grains from your quiet horse it will actually be much quieter ;)
     
    10-10-2008, 09:31 AM
  #19
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peggysue    
Yes sweet feeds can and do cause some horses to be hot and in fact if you remove all the grains from your quiet horse it will actually be much quieter ;)
I'm going to jump back in on this thread since it's still pretty active. Blaze arrives this weekend-ee! I'm so bound and determined to change his diet, and his owners gave me the green light to do what I want. I watched them feed him last night; he gets probably the equivalent of a coffee can of sweet feed a day, fed once at night.

I've been reading through all of these threads/posts, and ideally, I'd love to have him on nothing but grass and hay. He seems way too silly to me on the sweet feed (but his lack of exercise is prob. Contributing there as well). I know I need to transition gradually, and they're sending me with some sweet feed to begin with. However, from what I understand, the barn doesn't put out much hay right now because their pastures are huge and still lush.

I wouldn't call him a "hot" horse, his owners call him hyper. He's just got too much energy that's not being expended; I can see it clearly. Their 2 older horses seem very placid on the sweet feed, but different strokes, right?

So let me get my thoughts organized. Because winter's coming, should I just transition him to a different feed/grain? He'll be getting a grass hay mixture of clover/alfalfa during the winter. Peggy Sue, I have all your previous feed suggestions saved on my computer
     
    10-10-2008, 11:30 AM
  #20
Green Broke
If the pastures are lush, then he really doesn't need any hay except when he's inside. To keep him from getting hyper, keep him turned out as much as possible, preferably 24/7 with just stall time to eat a little or during bad weather.

I would slowly switch him over to a ration balancer feed. Call your local feed stores and see if they carry one. Ask for a specific product name though, as most feed stores haven't caught on to whole ration balancer thing ;). Here's a good list of most of what's out there: Specific Ration Balancer Products You'll want one formulated for grass hay. You can also Google each company and check to see who's a distributor in your area.

You feed just 1-2 lbs of a ration balancer daily. Slowly switch him over to it over a two week period. If he' holds his weight fine, you don't need to add anything else. If notice him dropping weight, add more hay. You can also add plain whole oats to the RB and/or a fat source like corn oil or flax seeds. Most horses keep their weight fine with just the RB though, as long as they're getting enough hay.

If your local feed stores don't have any, then I would do what I do, feed a simple diet that includes a vitamin supplement for horses not on any fortified grain. Smark Pak has a line called Smart Vite for this purpose. Otherse include Select II, Balance, II, Uckele's Equi-Base Grass, Linpro, Mega-Cell, Augment, etc. I feed one of these along with 1 lb of whole oats and 3lbs of chopped alfalfa hay (or alfalfa pellets). My hay is all grass hay. My hyper gelding has really calmed down and my mare's heats are much less noticable. They also have better hooves & hair, less rainrot, and less thrush than as compared to when I was feeding them a commercial feed.
     

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