What Makes a Good Horse Owner?
 
 

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What Makes a Good Horse Owner?

This is a discussion on What Makes a Good Horse Owner? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • What makes someone a good horse owner
  • What a Great Horse Owner is

 
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    05-13-2010, 08:35 AM
  #1
Foal
Smile What Makes a Good Horse Owner?

So I've been thinking lately about what makes a good/great horse owner. I just wanted to see what values you guys thought a good/great horse owner has.
     
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    05-13-2010, 08:45 AM
  #2
Foal
Okay im 100% sure you have to adore and love your horse!!!
which I do.
<3 my manny :)
     
    05-13-2010, 10:02 AM
  #3
Foal
IMHO, a good/great horse owner understands the needs of the animal and has the budget to be able to afford proper care; is knowledgeable about horse behavior; provides appropriate facilities for the animal; is compassionate, yet firm; does not anthropomorphize (attribute human behaviors to) the animal; spends the right amount of time with the animal training it and keeping it occupied; exposes the animal to different circumstances and surroundings so it will be socialized and properly desensitized; and, in the end, knows when to let the horse go so its quality of life is not compromised.
     
    05-13-2010, 10:05 AM
  #4
Showing
Is the one who's horses look nice, fat (it's pretty general statement as say some horses stay on skinnier side, some may have something with the health (like tumor, which doesn't cause the pain, but don't let to get lots of weight, and so on)), healthy and happy.

But to be more specific the one, who provides enough (nutritional) food, water, vet (when needed), farrier, teeth floating (when needed), deworming, and who does NOT dump the used horse to the auction just because it's old or injured and can't compete (or even ride) anymore (the last drives me crazy - I've seen it at the auction too many time ).

I didn't mention training because some people take in old/pasture pets horses, which don't need real training, but the owner is still a "good" owner. Also the person may not fuss all over the horse with hugs and kisses and treats and still be a great owner, on other hand I've seen those feeding bunch of treats and not giving dewormer or proper hoof care, so it all depends.
     
    05-13-2010, 10:20 AM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuleWrangler    
IMHO, a good/great horse owner understands the needs of the animal and has the budget to be able to afford proper care; is knowledgeable about horse behavior; provides appropriate facilities for the animal; is compassionate, yet firm; does not anthropomorphize (attribute human behaviors to) the animal; spends the right amount of time with the animal training it and keeping it occupied; exposes the animal to different circumstances and surroundings so it will be socialized and properly desensitized; and, in the end, knows when to let the horse go so its quality of life is not compromised.
Ditto!!
     
    05-13-2010, 11:20 AM
  #6
Green Broke
Patience, a willingness to learn, a genuine love for the animal and the sport and the ability to remain level headed at all times. Oh and money. Lots of it.
     
    05-13-2010, 11:32 AM
  #7
Green Broke
I agree with the above but would like to add that a good horse owner knows when it's in the horses best interest NOT to own one. I have seen so many people who "could never sell my horse" and yet they can't afford the vet or farrier and a lot of times proper feed. They are so afraid that their beloved horse will end up wit someone who will abuse it (probably read Black Beauty too many times), and yet they can't see that their lack of proper care is abuse itself and unfair to the animal.
     
    05-13-2010, 12:09 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Lots of great replies, many of which trail right back to those two little words "common sense"; throw some logic and gut instinct into the formula as to when it's the right thing to do "this" or "that".

I know a few folks that have had horses for 30 years that would make all the horses they've gone thru much happier if they'd've just bought a stuffed one from WalMart. Horses are well cared for, trimmed regularly, get their vaccines on time, blah blah blah. Somehow the horse owner(s) have managed to remain clueless that the reason all the horses they have gone thru just might be them! What a concept.

On the flip side, I am acquainted with a few horse owners that have only been into horses for five years or less. They already know more than the lifers mentioned above becaussssssss - they've got common sense and actually use it

So just because the horse is spit-shined, hooves filed to perfection, and every vaccine known to man has been injected into the horse for 2010, does not mean the person is a good horse owner.

It shows they care plenty, but that still doesn't make them a great horse owner; it does make them a good horse caregiver in terms of basic health needs.

I may catch some flack for that and some of the younger generation may not quite understand my thoughts only because they haven't traveled down Life's road as far as I have, but that's how I see things thru these old eyes
     
    05-13-2010, 01:32 PM
  #9
Foal
Having proper horse care is important, yes but anyone can do that and own a horse. It does not take much to call a farrier every 6 weeks, a vet once a year, a dentist once a year, etc.
To me a good horse owner is one who regardless if they need to or not, they take that time to visit their horse every day. (I board right now). A person who takes time every day to groom, walk, work with personally. A person who knows the personality of the horse and knows that instant something is off.
I have boarded at a barn that the owners do the vet, do the farrier, hire people to clean stalls and turn out and have nothing to do with the horse themselves. They would have no idea if something was wrong.
At the barn now, we are all pretty hands on but one boarder who may show up once a week if that. She may provide his needs but without that companionship why own a horse? They need TLC and interaction.
     
    05-13-2010, 02:21 PM
  #10
Green Broke
Just so people don't think I was suggesting that only rich people make good owners, here is what I really meant:

It's about being sat down by your parents when you are 6 years old and told that you will never be able to have a horse as its too expensive. It's about getting a job waitressing (to start saving) at the local Chinese restaurant when you are 13 as that is the only place that will hire someone so young. It's about starting to work for a cranky old racehorse trainer at age 14 breaking 2 year olds and riding trackwork, realizing that you will never get paid but that the experience will be invaluable. It's about working for him for 10 years, 5 days a week around school and Uni right up until the day he died of old age in his sleep at 86.

It's about saving up all the money yourself to buy your first horse and maintaining as many hours at your job as possible around study to ensure that you always have enough money to offer your horse the best possible home whilst never having to ask your parents for money. Working two jobs around full time Uni to pay for the upkeep of your eventers, plus their EFA fees and registrations.

Not going to things like Debutante balls, school formals, holidays, nights out with friends because you would rather spend the money you make on your horse and competitions.

Getting to your twenties and discovering the wisdom of having around $2000 stashed somewhere at all times for emergency vet bills. Asking for a dressage saddle for your 21st birthday instead of expensive jewellery and then getting more use out of that saddle than any of your friends got out of necklaces/earrings that were probably lost or went out of fashion. It's about still seeking different trainers to work with and different horses to ride so that you never stop learning and being able to apply everything you learn to your own horses, never being afraid to admit you don't know something or could improve in some area.

Realizing that as much as you think you know, there is someone out there who knows more and the trick is to find them and learn from them.

Looking back at all of the decisions you made and realizing you wouldn't have changed a thing.
     

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