What is the normal prognosis for Nevicular Disease? - Page 2
   

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What is the normal prognosis for Nevicular Disease?

This is a discussion on What is the normal prognosis for Nevicular Disease? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
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        10-30-2009, 12:11 AM
      #11
    Weanling
    ** I forgot to add that you want your farrier to roll her toe for a quicker breakover - that helps her to get off her foot quicker.
         
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        10-31-2009, 01:03 AM
      #12
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rosetreader    
    I agree, but I want to clarify as well.
    Well, the way you put it Rose, I agree too. So it seems I don't completely disagree with Qtrhorse after all, just the way I understood it.

    Quote:
    Most navicular horses have toe flaring and may appear like they are at a lower angle, when the flare merely needs grown out.
    Yes, shudder at the thought of the poor horses made to 'stand up' on their flares. It's unfortunately still not a rare sight. I think this is a major contributor of heels becoming 'underslung', as the leverage forces tearing at the poor walls are also acting to pull the heels forward.

    Quote:
    All around I've gone from being told she had mild arthritis when I bought her and her limping only occasionally to her constantly limping, some days she doesn't even want to move. Vet's wanting to charge anywhere from $50-$500 to do the same procedures for a diagnosis. (I have contacted 4 different vets) All I want is my mare to not be in pain!!!!
    That sounds like a similar story to my poor donkey's, and the main reason I learned about all this in the beginning. The prognosis by 'experts' was initial puzzlement & guessing, copious tests, then pronounced hopeless by all & he'd been on permanent painkillers for his 'arthritis' for a couple of years, & was in his 20s(& ended up with sole penetration!!) when I stumbled upon some people who caused me to rethink what I 'knew' & start learning about it. He spent the last decade of his life sound & happy & energetic, not a painkiller in sight.

    If you posted some hoof pics, you'll get some more specific opinions for your consideration.
         
        10-31-2009, 01:15 AM
      #13
    Showing
    You have received excellent advice from the other posters so I just wanted to add that one of my horses was diagnosed with Navicular as a 5 year old due to improper shoeing (zero heel and uber long toes). Anyway, with proper hoof care and a meticulous shoeing schedule, he was sound for many years and was finally retired about 2 years ago at the age of 24 because he was getting arthritis and my step mom felt bad about riding him. During the last couple of years, he needed wedge pads to keep him sound while we were using him but when he is turned out, he gets along great barefoot. He still tries to romp and run with the younger horses but he is getting a bit too old and his arthritis has really slowed him up. Navicular is not a death sentence and is completely manageable so long as it is caught early and you are meticulous. One thing I did notice with Flash is that on flat ground, he was very sound but often on an angle to either side, he would take more lame-ish steps.
         

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