What are we doing? A few thoughts..... - Page 4
 
 

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What are we doing? A few thoughts.....

This is a discussion on What are we doing? A few thoughts..... within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        03-29-2013, 11:17 AM
      #31
    Showing
    Great thread Muppet!

    I have changed some things over the years from what my grandpa did 50 years ago (mainly chucking out the sweet feed of years gone by and just using a rb when needed to make up for a bad hay year and trimming hooves through winter) but most things aren't all that much different when it comes down to it. Basic needs are basic needs and their basic needs are no different today than they were 20, 30, 40, etc years ago. Science has just given owners just enough to be dangerous.

    The nitpicking when riding has always been a peeve of mine. I'm frequently heard saying "Get him where you want him, pitch him away and leave him the * alone". You shouldn't have to constantly be picking at or adjusting a horse, if you need (or feel you need) to do that, there's a hole that should have been addressed long ago.

    Oh and *gasp* I still have barb wire around my perimeter fences. I do plan to heat it all up eventually but in 50 years there has been one horse (out of hundreds, if not pushing the thousand mark) hurt on the barb. Now if it were acre paddocks, it would be a totally different story.
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        03-29-2013, 11:23 AM
      #32
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MHFoundation Quarters    
    Great thread Muppet!

    I have changed some things over the years from what my grandpa did 50 years ago (mainly chucking out the sweet feed of years gone by and just using a rb when needed to make up for a bad hay year and trimming hooves through winter) but most things aren't all that much different when it comes down to it. Basic needs are basic needs and their basic needs are no different today than they were 20, 30, 40, etc years ago. Science has just given owners just enough to be dangerous.

    The nitpicking when riding has always been a peeve of mine. I'm frequently heard saying "Get him where you want him, pitch him away and leave him the * alone". You shouldn't have to constantly be picking at or adjusting a horse, if you need (or feel you need) to do that, there's a hole that should have been addressed long ago.

    Oh and *gasp* I still have barb wire around my perimeter fences. I do plan to heat it all up eventually but in 50 years there has been one horse (out of hundreds, if not pushing the thousand mark) hurt on the barb. Now if it were acre paddocks, it would be a totally different story.

    I've found when horses are happy, have food, and room to move, they rarely bother fences :)
         
        03-29-2013, 11:34 PM
      #33
    Trained
    Yes I wholeheartedly agree. I have single handedly managed my horse to the FEI levels, international competitions and being recognized by my NF as an "up and coming horse". I am hoping to be on the national long list this year.

    My horse lives in a field. He comes inside at night during the winter because it's ridiculously cold and he is clipped. Last year he lived outside 24/7 as much as weather and the bugs permitted. Last year, I also pulled his shoes. He gets fed hay, cubes, a ration balancer (which I've had to "complete" with the addition of MagCit and Biotin, the amounts are just too low for him) and MSM. His soundness is managed by my vet and we do very consistent check ups and have him on a routine of Adequan. His x-rays have not changed since his PPE at 5 years old.
    My coach thinks I'm nuts for having him out in a field but he is so happy, very, very sound and now with the help of my amazing farrier he is happy and sound now without shoes.

    Other than that it's good training, conditioning and a varied work schedule to keep him on top of his game. As I say, he is a dressage horse - but the horse part comes first. Yes he is very valuable but I have seen far more horses get hurt in stalls and tiny pens. As long as the field is well maintained and managed and any pasture mates carefully selected it is definitely possible to maintain a high level, internationally competitive horse in a very natural way.
         
        03-30-2013, 10:08 AM
      #34
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
    Yes I wholeheartedly agree. I have single handedly managed my horse to the FEI levels, international competitions and being recognized by my NF as an "up and coming horse". I am hoping to be on the national long list this year.

    My horse lives in a field. He comes inside at night during the winter because it's ridiculously cold and he is clipped. Last year he lived outside 24/7 as much as weather and the bugs permitted. Last year, I also pulled his shoes. He gets fed hay, cubes, a ration balancer (which I've had to "complete" with the addition of MagCit and Biotin, the amounts are just too low for him) and MSM. His soundness is managed by my vet and we do very consistent check ups and have him on a routine of Adequan. His x-rays have not changed since his PPE at 5 years old.
    My coach thinks I'm nuts for having him out in a field but he is so happy, very, very sound and now with the help of my amazing farrier he is happy and sound now without shoes.

    Other than that it's good training, conditioning and a varied work schedule to keep him on top of his game. As I say, he is a dressage horse - but the horse part comes first. Yes he is very valuable but I have seen far more horses get hurt in stalls and tiny pens. As long as the field is well maintained and managed and any pasture mates carefully selected it is definitely possible to maintain a high level, internationally competitive horse in a very natural way.
    Ill bet he's one of the happiest dressage horses out there- good for you! And *gasp* you probably aren't dealing with ulcers and other vices :) Not trying to diss other dressage riders, by any means, but it's refreshing to see that top competitors are successful while taking a natural approach with their animals, versus stalling it 24/7 and keeping it bubble wrapped and hand walked.
    Muppetgirl and Dustbunny like this.
         
        03-30-2013, 11:29 AM
      #35
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
    Yes I wholeheartedly agree. I have single handedly managed my horse to the FEI levels, international competitions and being recognized by my NF as an "up and coming horse". I am hoping to be on the national long list this year.

    My horse lives in a field. He comes inside at night during the winter because it's ridiculously cold and he is clipped. Last year he lived outside 24/7 as much as weather and the bugs permitted. Last year, I also pulled his shoes. He gets fed hay, cubes, a ration balancer (which I've had to "complete" with the addition of MagCit and Biotin, the amounts are just too low for him) and MSM. His soundness is managed by my vet and we do very consistent check ups and have him on a routine of Adequan. His x-rays have not changed since his PPE at 5 years old.
    My coach thinks I'm nuts for having him out in a field but he is so happy, very, very sound and now with the help of my amazing farrier he is happy and sound now without shoes.

    Other than that it's good training, conditioning and a varied work schedule to keep him on top of his game. As I say, he is a dressage horse - but the horse part comes first. Yes he is very valuable but I have seen far more horses get hurt in stalls and tiny pens. As long as the field is well maintained and managed and any pasture mates carefully selected it is definitely possible to maintain a high level, internationally competitive horse in a very natural way.
    Anabel, I have often thought you were a smart ans sensible horsewoman when I have read your posts. Now, reading this, I think it even more so. I hope you share your success with others.
    Posted via Mobile Device
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