When to find a new farrier?
   

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When to find a new farrier?

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  • 9 farrier mistakes
  • Farrier mistakes

 
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    05-26-2010, 11:22 AM
  #1
Weanling
When to find a new farrier?

I have a question inspired by another farrier post (didn't want to be a thread thief so I started this one).

I've been using the same farrier for over a year now and have never had a problem. My aunt used him as well and up until the last visit things had been great. Well, he came and trimmed both of our horses feet and her mare (who is also 8 months in foal) came up veeery lame the following morning. He took off way too much toe and left her feet very uneven and tiny (smallest I've ever seen them). She (the mare) didn't want to move and when she did struggle to take a step she looked miserable. After consulting our vet she gave her a dose of banamine (sp?) massaged her legs several times a day (which just about made her fall asleep- it was too cute) and she is now comfortable- four days later. My question is this- Do we give him another chance, or is it one strike and you're out? My aunt has her mind made up and is looking for a new trimmer, but I'm not so sure. Switching to a new farrier is scary, but then again so is the alternitave.
     
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    05-26-2010, 11:39 AM
  #2
Green Broke
When and if to change to a new farrier can always be a difficult prospect. If this were a first or second time with your farrier and this happened, I'd be inclined to move on - but since you have been using this farrier for over a year and (I assume) been happy with the job he's done, then the situation might be needing a little more thought. Have you spoken with your farrier about what happened? Does he know the mare went lame and required veterinary intervention, how did he react to the situation, did he give reasons for cutting her back so short, all these things I'd take into consideration and speak with him about before making a decision, especially seeing you haven't had problems personally with your own horse. There is always two sides to the story, and it's worth getting his to make an educated choice. Good luck!
     
    05-26-2010, 11:43 AM
  #3
Showing
One strike after all this time and you'd kick him to the curb? Um, no.

Everyone is human, and occasionally people are going to make mistakes at their job no matter what it is.

I'd say if this is the very first time in over a year that you've had a problem, the odds are good that this was an aberration.

Good farriers are hard to find, and I'd be inclined to forgive him one mistake. However, if he continued to make mistakes, I'd be shopping for a new farrier.
     
    05-26-2010, 11:55 AM
  #4
Green Broke
Yes, yes and yes to everything Speedracer said.
     
    05-26-2010, 12:00 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indyhorse    
Have you spoken with your farrier about what happened? Does he know the mare went lame and required veterinary intervention, how did he react to the situation, did he give reasons for cutting her back so short, all these things I'd take into consideration and speak with him about before making a decision, especially seeing you haven't had problems personally with your own horse. There is always two sides to the story, and it's worth getting his to make an educated choice. Good luck!
I did speak with him the day she came up lame (the day oafter the trim) and he did express concern about it, however didn't really have an explination. Also he hasn't followed up since which I think would've been nice, but that is neither here nor there.

My aunt is dead set on replacing him-though she is looking at this through very emotional eyes ("she is in foal, she was abused, she's such a sweet pony she doesn't deserve to be in pain" etc) and not seeing te previous year without incodent. This poses a problem for me as our horses are on the same schedule and I hold her mare for the farrier since she is a work and I live next door. It would be a PITA to be double booking farriers. I feel comfortable giving him another shot- I'm sure he'll be extra careful from here on out since this happened.
     
    05-26-2010, 12:03 PM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
One strike after all this time and you'd kick him to the curb? Um, no.

Everyone is human, and occasionally people are going to make mistakes at their job no matter what it is.

I'd say if this is the very first time in over a year that you've had a problem, the odds are good that this was an aberration.

Good farriers are hard to find, and I'd be inclined to forgive him one mistake. However, if he continued to make mistakes, I'd be shopping for a new farrier.
Thats what I'm thinking.

I haven't been able to change my aunts mind about breeding her mare, putting helmets on herself or kids and I doubt this will be any different, but I'll try. I may have to change my mare's schedule by a day or two, but I'm not ready to start looking for a replacement just yet. As you said- humans make mistakes.
     
    05-26-2010, 12:09 PM
  #7
Showing
Ktibb, if your aunt is dead set on another farrier, then let her find one for her own mare and you keep the same guy.

Oh, and tell her since she thinks farriers should be completely infallible and never, ever make a mistake, then it's up to her to book the new guy and hold her own animal when he comes.

Seriously, your aunt sounds like an equine professional's nightmare. I have a feeling nobody is ever going to be good enough for her sweet little Pookie-kins, and she'll soon find herself without any options because she'll have alienated everyone within a 50 mile radius.
     
    05-26-2010, 12:10 PM
  #8
Showing
I was in a similar situation. My farrier broke up with his girlfriend and trim was awful. However we are all human, things happen, so I gave him a chance 2 more times. But after the bad trim 3 times in row when I had to re-trim them myself 2 weeks later because lots of toes were left, chipping, no roll, etc. I said it's enough. It's not so much even about the money but it's bad on horses and hard on my back.
     
    05-26-2010, 12:13 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
Ktibb, if your aunt is dead set on another farrier, then let her find one for her own mare and you keep the same guy.

Oh, and tell her since she thinks farriers should be completely infallible and never, ever make a mistake, then it's up to her to book the new guy and hold her own animal when he comes.

Seriously, your aunt sounds like an equine professional's nightmare.
Sure would save me some time and energy! This is the first time I've ever seen her upset with anyone that provides a service for our horses in at least 5 years, which isn't too bad I think, but this situation blew up really big, really quickly.
     
    05-26-2010, 12:16 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
It's not so much even about the money but it's bad on horses and hard on my back.
Exactly. I'm happy to pay for regular trimming- it's part of owning horses, but I want to be sure it's in their best interests. Hope to hear from others that have been there.
     

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