why is she so fat?
 
 

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why is she so fat?

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  • The fatest fjord horse

 
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    06-24-2007, 02:16 PM
  #1
Yearling
why is she so fat?

Out of the ponies on the yard, she is the most excersised but the fattest? She is on a field with lots of grass, I can't reduce hours. But in 4 weeks its the summer hols so she can be stood in. What can I do? I have a big show coming up and she is a real fattie. Does anyone know the best way to lose weight through excersising? I can't put a muzzle on because its cruel and wouldnt be allowed
     
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    06-24-2007, 05:24 PM
  #2
Foal
I can't help much, but I'm assuming she is not getting any other food, just the pasture. If she is getting something else, it needs to be changed or cut out.

For exercise, can you ride up and down some hills? It really conditions the horse well, uses lots of calories, and does wonders for their top line. Other than that, lots and lots of riding, especially if you can get out of an arena, and just ride. Trot, gallop, do cross country, that type of thing. Uses more energy than arena work. Of course that depends on what type of arena work... Jumping uses lots of energy, so does dressage if you really work it. Sometimes training can be stressful, and just like us people, some horses eat more when they are under stress. Hacking, or trail riding / cross country is sometimes less stressful for horses.

Not always, it definitely depends on the horse. But you might try it if you can.
     
    06-24-2007, 07:30 PM
  #3
Yearling
I would also work well at the trot. The trot is much more of a work out then even the canter or gallop. At least what I have been told.
     
    06-25-2007, 01:15 AM
  #4
Weanling
Moomoo I think some horse are just born to be fat. My gelding was getting more work then any other horse in the district and he was still the fattest. Our average week would be: three half hours of jumping, four half hours of games (fast) hours of trail riding we'd do about four hours each weekend (lots of trot, big hills) and he was still fat!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    06-25-2007, 04:50 PM
  #5
Yearling
I would agree, but she is nice and slim in the winter

I hack out 5 days a week and go in the areana for 10 mins after the hack a couple of days, and for an hour and a half on saturdays, then a show on sunday or a day off

We have no hills!! Not the slightest gradient

We do lots of fast walking, average trotting and a bit of cantering on each ride x
     
    06-25-2007, 04:50 PM
  #6
Yearling
I would agree, but she is nice and slim in the winter

I hack out 5 days a week and go in the areana for 10 mins after the hack a couple of days, and for an hour and a half on saturdays, then a show on sunday or a day off

We have no hills!! Not the slightest gradient

We do lots of fast walking, average trotting and a bit of cantering on each ride x
     
    06-25-2007, 05:01 PM
  #7
Yearling
Why do you think muzzles are cruel? They are able to graze and enjoy all aspects of it, just limited on the amount they eat. I think it is cruel consciously allowing a horse to continue to be obese and set them up for MAJOR health issues.

Personally, if you can't limit grazing, throw a muzzle on. What exercise regime are you working?
     
    06-26-2007, 04:49 PM
  #8
Yearling
Mon-fri: 2 hour hack, lots of fast walking, we trot quite alot, canter a few times and sometimes have a little galllop. (also 15 mins in the arena every other day, with almost constant trot & canter work)

Sat: hour and a half lesson, lots of work, sometimes a hack afterwards also

Sun: show or very big hack, again, lots of work

(she has every other monday off)
     
    07-13-2007, 12:42 PM
  #9
Weanling
I have to agree with Kristy. Grazing muzzles are NOT cruel. They can still eat, drink etc. It just limits the amount of grass they get. IMO having a horse too fat is cruel. An overweight horse can suffer the same things as humans do. Coronary heart disease, diabetes etc. They are more uncomfortable in the summer heat, and can make it hard to breathe. It is also more difficult for them to work. I would either limit her time on grass (dry lot for example) or get a muzzle.
     
    07-13-2007, 01:03 PM
  #10
Started
I wouldn't call the use of a grazing muzzle cruel. One of my friends used to have a fjord (I'm sure some of you can vouch for how easy they are to keep!) and used a grazing muzzle on him. Even with regular excercise, he was never what you would call slender. His genetics were just geared for sparse grazing, not lush Virginia pastures. Ask yourself: would your horse rather do more work, be in a dry lot by herself, or be out with her mates in the field?
     

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