Winter blanketing advice for an indoor horse
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Winter blanketing advice for an indoor horse

This is a discussion on Winter blanketing advice for an indoor horse within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • do you stall horse winter horse forum
  • Blanketing horses in the stall

Like Tree3Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    07-08-2012, 02:47 PM
  #1
Weanling
Winter blanketing advice for an indoor horse

Hi guys!
My boy is moving to a new stable this weekend. He will go from being an outdoor horse his whole life, to living primarily in a stall (with turnout of course).

My question is concerning blanketing this winter. Usually I just kept him in a medium/light weight blanket all winter long, since he was outside. This year, I have to balance between two temps, the indoor and the outdoor. The barn is not heated, and has about 9 horses. He will be in an end stall, closest to the door. The stall has no windows. Would I need to blanket him in his stall? If so, what kind of stable blanket?

Any advice would be great.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    07-08-2012, 02:49 PM
  #2
Trained
Just use what you have and see how he likes it. If he sweats, you'll need something lighter, but with him going in and out, it will probably be fine in an unheated barn.
     
    07-08-2012, 02:51 PM
  #3
Yearling
Let him grow a winter coat. If he is not shivering then don't blanket him. A healthy coat serves a purpose. A blanket can hinder this purpose. If he does shiver, a medium weight blanket would be fine.
DRichmond likes this.
     
    07-08-2012, 03:05 PM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by goneriding    
Let him grow a winter coat. If he is not shivering then don't blanket him. A healthy coat serves a purpose. A blanket can hinder this purpose. If he does shiver, a medium weight blanket would be fine.
He shivers like crazy outside and looses an insane amount of weight each winter. I have always blanketed him as an outdoor horse. He will continue to get blanketed during turnout. I just cannot determine if he will need a stable blanket as well.
     
    07-08-2012, 03:31 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by mselizabeth    
He shivers like crazy outside and looses an insane amount of weight each winter. I have always blanketed him as an outdoor horse. He will continue to get blanketed during turnout. I just cannot determine if he will need a stable blanket as well.
Wait & see how insulated & warm the barn is.
My barn is not heated & the blanketed horses have their blankets taken off when they come in or they would get too warm even on our coldest days. The horses do have full coats though & are only blanketed outside as a wind block.

If your horse was losing weight & shivering his blanket was not heavy enough for outside but may be fine for indoors, if needed.
     
    07-08-2012, 04:11 PM
  #6
Weanling
I don't know what breed he is, and where you're located - some breeds aren't well suited to cold climates, vice versa with desert climates but can adapt and often have to.

Age and overall health, how you feed during the Winter, what if any shelter is provided, whether the horse is competing for feed, are some factors to consider.

Blanketing a horse throughout an entire Winter to me points to other things which may need to be looked at. Now that you're in a different environment where he has shelter, I think optimally he should have little need for blanketing except during extreme cold and/or wet temperatures. Overblanketing causes its own problems.

Other blanketing problems are caused by not using waterproof turnouts and correct density, or using stable blankets for turnouts (I'm not saying you do this).

How a person feeds during Winter is really critical. Usually, providing feed 24/7 when it's cold and wet is one of your best defenses, in addition to having 24/7 access to natural or manmade shelter and windbreaks. I'm generalizing which I don't like to do, but overall I have found many people if they would change their feed schedule during the Winter to reflect the horses' natural needs and means of staying warm, they will have a healthier horse who requires less blanketing.
     
    07-08-2012, 04:43 PM
  #7
Showing
By blanketing you can make him colder. A horse can control his coat, standing up to trap warm air coming from his body or flatten it to release the heat. A blanket flattens the coat, destroying his ability to regulate his temperature. The stable I rode at as a teen was often -20 and not one horse was blanketed. Even the TBs grew good dense coats. When riding we pretty much kept to a walk with a little trotting so as not to heat them up. The odd horse would require a good towelling on his chest but usually it was just the saddle area.
     
    07-08-2012, 11:22 PM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by DRichmond    
I don't know what breed he is, and where you're located - some breeds aren't well suited to cold climates, vice versa with desert climates but can adapt and often have to.

Age and overall health, how you feed during the Winter, what if any shelter is provided, whether the horse is competing for feed, are some factors to consider.

Blanketing a horse throughout an entire Winter to me points to other things which may need to be looked at. Now that you're in a different environment where he has shelter, I think optimally he should have little need for blanketing except during extreme cold and/or wet temperatures. Overblanketing causes its own problems.

Other blanketing problems are caused by not using waterproof turnouts and correct density, or using stable blankets for turnouts (I'm not saying you do this).

How a person feeds during Winter is really critical. Usually, providing feed 24/7 when it's cold and wet is one of your best defenses, in addition to having 24/7 access to natural or manmade shelter and windbreaks. I'm generalizing which I don't like to do, but overall I have found many people if they would change their feed schedule during the Winter to reflect the horses' natural needs and means of staying warm, they will have a healthier horse who requires less blanketing.

We are located in the Nebraska/Iowa metro area. We get extreme temps during the winter, and they usually change quite a bit. Often it will be 50 degrees one day, and 15 the next. We get to about -10 on our coldest nights.

He is a thoroughbred, with a somewhat high metabolism. Right now, he has had access to a round bale, and 2lbs of strategy feed a day. At the new barn he will be receiving 3 flakes of brome, twice a day, and the same amount of grain. He was on 3 lbs when I got him (and was underweight). He will most likely go up to 3lbs again this winter.

His blanket is 150 grams of fill, waterproof.

His turnout area will also not have a shelter. It's just a large field.

I think he might be okay without one in the barn, then just a blanket when its like 30 degrees F or below for turnout. I may have him moved to an interior stall, too.
DRichmond likes this.
     
    07-08-2012, 11:43 PM
  #9
Started
In the stables I was at, everyone rugged in winter except people with minis or drafthorses. Brock was never clipped and I was always the last to bring out a rug so he grew a nice winter coat, but it could get quite drafty in there and he did get cold. I used a doona rug, and he never sweated up and it only got down to about 4C (39F). Now he's out in a paddock and it gets down lower than that but he's rugged the same. Horses can't really move around in a stable to keep warm, so sometimes an outdoor environment can allow them to be warmer (except when it rains).
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    07-09-2012, 12:02 AM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mselizabeth    
He shivers like crazy outside and looses an insane amount of weight each winter. I have always blanketed him as an outdoor horse. He will continue to get blanketed during turnout. I just cannot determine if he will need a stable blanket as well.
if you are happy with the way he was blanketed stick to it. A stable blanket simply means there are no pleated panels that allow free movement during turnout. Wearing a turnout blanket with pleats will not in any way be a problem in the stall. The barn will be a wind break but pretty much will remain a similar temp to the outside. If it goes above 40degrees he should not be blanketed in either situation to prevent overheating which can be dangerous. BTW if you are able to increase the availability of hay to him during the winter he might not lose as much weight..horses will increase their metabolism to stay warm so if them munch on more hay it allows their body to stay warmer without depleting body stores
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Winter Riding? No Indoor, or rather a very small indoor?? HorsesAreForever Horse Riding 4 01-19-2012 09:54 AM
winter blanketing or no winter blanketing? allisonjoy Horse Tack and Equipment 6 11-07-2011 10:34 PM
Winter Blanketing Passion4Horses Horse Health 0 08-27-2011 05:06 PM
How do I go about blanketing mid-winter- my horse is losing condition Rache7549 Horse Health 4 02-01-2011 07:19 PM
Winter blanketing draftrider Horse Health 5 07-23-2010 10:10 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0