Wobbler Syndrome??
   

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Wobbler Syndrome??

This is a discussion on Wobbler Syndrome?? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Equine wobbles
  • Horse wobblers is it hereditary

 
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    04-18-2012, 07:29 AM
  #1
Yearling
Wobbler Syndrome??

My neighbor asked if I would exercise her mare once in a while, but she told me that she had wobblers syndrome. Now i've seen this mare come barreling across the field to come and greet my horses, and she's never missed a stride, and i've seen her nieces and nephews ride her around a bit, and i've seen no symptoms of wobblers. I don't know much of this mares past, but she seems to be a pretty good horse, besides being a good escape artist. Do you think it is still ok to ride her despite her condition??

Thank you!!
     
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    04-19-2012, 12:04 AM
  #2
Foal
Have you had her checked for EPM? Or is there Rys grass in the paddock?
     
    04-19-2012, 10:00 AM
  #3
Yearling
She's been checked by a vet several times, and in PA there isn't much rye grass unless its planted. The vet said she's healthy enough to be ridden, just have to watch just incase she has an episode. I've never seen anything, her nieces and nephews have ridden her around lightly, with no complications. The mare was given to her, because of this so called health condition, we don't know much of her past. If she's registered i'll try looking up her bloodlines to see if any of her parents had any health conditions. Though wobblers isn't hereditary....
     
    04-19-2012, 10:46 AM
  #4
Teen Forum Moderator
Well I don't know anything about Wobblers Syndrome in horses, but my 11 month old puppy has it fairly severely. He undergoes strenuous therapy every week to build and retain muscles and retrain his nerves, but when you look at him you can still absolutely tell that there is something wrong with him.

Have you ever seen this horse have an episode? To me it actually sounds like it could of been a misdiagnosis- as wobblers is generally fairly consistent with its appearance. It doesn't just turn on and off. There is a possibility that this horse might instead have Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (SP?! No idea if I even pronounce that right much less spell it) or even Cerebullar Abiotrophy.

If she does have episode of whatever this is often though, I absolutely would not ride her. If they were very rare and you warm her up well (watching for folding of her fetlocks, shakiness in the rump, etc) I'd think that a leisurely walk or trot around the arena might be ok. Its just hard to tell without having seen her have an episode.

My dog, dispite his problems, still behaves like a normal dog would. He (attempts to anyways, he looks pathetic) jumps, runs, plays, and causes lots of trouble, and he doesn't seem to know theres something wrong with him. Its my job to regulate him though and make sure that he doesn't stress his body too much though, because its weaker than the usual animal's. I'd say the same goes for this mare. I'd have another vet come out and check her for wobblers, and see if that's even what she has in the first place, then go by their suggestion as to whether or not she can be ridden.


Also a side note, Wobblers actually can be hereditary in some cases. It comes in different forms and I believe that Equine Wobblers Anemia has been found to be hereditary in a few cases.
     
    04-20-2012, 01:53 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endiku    
Well I don't know anything about Wobblers Syndrome in horses, but my 11 month old puppy has it fairly severely. He undergoes strenuous therapy every week to build and retain muscles and retrain his nerves, but when you look at him you can still absolutely tell that there is something wrong with him.

Have you ever seen this horse have an episode? To me it actually sounds like it could of been a misdiagnosis- as wobblers is generally fairly consistent with its appearance. It doesn't just turn on and off. There is a possibility that this horse might instead have Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (SP?! No idea if I even pronounce that right much less spell it) or even Cerebullar Abiotrophy.

If she does have episode of whatever this is often though, I absolutely would not ride her. If they were very rare and you warm her up well (watching for folding of her fetlocks, shakiness in the rump, etc) I'd think that a leisurely walk or trot around the arena might be ok. Its just hard to tell without having seen her have an episode.

My dog, dispite his problems, still behaves like a normal dog would. He (attempts to anyways, he looks pathetic) jumps, runs, plays, and causes lots of trouble, and he doesn't seem to know theres something wrong with him. Its my job to regulate him though and make sure that he doesn't stress his body too much though, because its weaker than the usual animal's. I'd say the same goes for this mare. I'd have another vet come out and check her for wobblers, and see if that's even what she has in the first place, then go by their suggestion as to whether or not she can be ridden.


Also a side note, Wobblers actually can be hereditary in some cases. It comes in different forms and I believe that Equine Wobblers Anemia has been found to be hereditary in a few cases.
Thank you, when this mare gets out, and they come and retrieve her, they lead her slowly home with a truck, an she jogs along just fine. I personally think it's a misdiagnosis too. Since my neighbor has owned her she's never noticed anything different about the way she moves or anything. I will ask her if she'll have another vet come out and look at her and properly diagnose her. I won't ride her until that is done. I hope your puppy has a good life even though it may be difficult for him. :)
     

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