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Wood chewing, help.

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  • Purchase McNasty wood chewing 2012
  • Starving horses and wood chewing

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    06-28-2012, 11:26 PM
  #11
Super Moderator
You don't need to feed grain at all. If you do, it puts even more Phosphorus into the horse's unbalanced diet.

You only need a loose mineral that is designed for livestock that is on lush grass. In our area, it is labeled as an 'un-medicated wheat pasture mineral'.

It solves several problems:

1) It supplies the additional Calcium that horses or other livestock need on grass.

2) It supplies the Magnesium needed to utilize the calcium and also helps horses that are nervous and anxious.

3) Any good loose mineral will also have Vitamin A added so it prevents rain rot, goopy eyes, bad skin, etc that is seen in the winter and spring months.

4) Any good loose mineral is palatable and horses readily eat it without any feed mixed in. As a matter of fact, when we get in a new horse that is mineral starved, they eat it like grain until they catch up with their mineral needs. I have had horses eat 10 or 15 pounds in a week or two until they catch up. Then, they eat 2 to 6 ounces a day with 4 being about average.

In the summer months, we also keep out a white salt block but they get most of their salt from their loose mineral.

Horses will stop eating trees, wood and dirt almost immediately when they are given a loose mineral like this one.
     
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    06-29-2012, 12:35 AM
  #12
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
You don't need to feed grain at all. If you do, it puts even more Phosphorus into the horse's unbalanced diet.

You only need a loose mineral that is designed for livestock that is on lush grass. In our area, it is labeled as an 'un-medicated wheat pasture mineral'.

It solves several problems:

1) It supplies the additional Calcium that horses or other livestock need on grass.

2) It supplies the Magnesium needed to utilize the calcium and also helps horses that are nervous and anxious.

3) Any good loose mineral will also have Vitamin A added so it prevents rain rot, goopy eyes, bad skin, etc that is seen in the winter and spring months.

4) Any good loose mineral is palatable and horses readily eat it without any feed mixed in. As a matter of fact, when we get in a new horse that is mineral starved, they eat it like grain until they catch up with their mineral needs. I have had horses eat 10 or 15 pounds in a week or two until they catch up. Then, they eat 2 to 6 ounces a day with 4 being about average.

In the summer months, we also keep out a white salt block but they get most of their salt from their loose mineral.

Horses will stop eating trees, wood and dirt almost immediately when they are given a loose mineral like this one.
Excellent information. Thank you so much. I will look for something at our feed store. They do have a mineral salt block and a himalyan salt block, but don't touch it too much. Do I suuply the minerals free choice?
     
    06-29-2012, 07:18 AM
  #13
Super Moderator
We use livestock minerals marketed for cattle. As long as they are not 'medicated', which always has a red tag and a big warning label, they are good for horses. The choices are much greater for cattle as there are companies that make about 50 different mineral formulas for livestock. Our mineral is made by Ragland and 'private labeled' for Stillwater Milling, a big OK company.

Trace mineral blocks are totally worthless and keep horses from licking enough salt. They only have 'micro minerals' in them and totally lack Calcium, Phosphorus or Magnesium, which are the ones that are always missing.
     
    06-29-2012, 07:37 AM
  #14
Showing
Mine get a chunk of poplar and they'll chew the bark off it. Give your horses loose salt as well and they are not getting enough from the lick which is designed for the raspy bovine tongue.
     
    06-29-2012, 12:09 PM
  #15
Green Broke
Throw some hot sauce on the fence, one taste they won't like it!! They also sell spays like McNasty and No chew you can apply to wood but hot sauce is the cheaper alternative.
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    06-29-2012, 12:32 PM
  #16
Foal
I second the McNasty. That stuff has worked like a charm for me with all my beaver horses. Just stand up wind when you spray it...breathe in just a little bit and it'll send you into an endless coughing fit haha. Terrible stuff but works SO well. I would definitely recommend it. It's the only thing that I've found that works.
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    06-29-2012, 12:51 PM
  #17
Green Broke
^^ oh yeah. I would maybe recommend wearing gloves when applying. If the get it in your mouth your going to be tasting it for hours!! It's not good! Lol And your eyes... Forget about it!
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    06-29-2012, 12:54 PM
  #18
Super Moderator
BUT, if you stop the pica without treating the cause, you are not fixing anything. Is it not better to correct the imbalance that 'drives' the desire to eat trees and fences?
     
    06-29-2012, 01:57 PM
  #19
Green Broke
Yes, it is obviously treating the reason why they are chewing will ultimately end the behavior. But the wood chewing is not helping them fix their imbalance. If anything it could be harmful, create bad habits and become quite costly in the mean time. Fencing and vet bills aren't cheap!
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    06-29-2012, 02:03 PM
  #20
Green Broke
If it is green treated lumber it is cured with salt and horses will chew on it. Too late but best to use brown treated lumber and kreosote treated posts. You can also paint them with used engine oil
     

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