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Worm woes-help me identify *with somewhat graphic pic*

This is a discussion on Worm woes-help me identify *with somewhat graphic pic* within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        09-10-2012, 10:26 AM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Yes, that was the point I was trying to make. There's no reason to be afraid of using this product, it is very effective, but you should have a vet involved. And it's always good to have questions to ask your vet, for instance asking if this product would be a good idea.

    I don't change anything in my horses diet/life without at least calling the vet to get their opinion first.

    Edit: My vet also said we had to wait on blood results to determine if she would be able to handle the Powerpac, so a blood draw will most likely be done, if for nothing else to see how the worms have affected the organs.
         
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        09-10-2012, 10:35 AM
      #12
    Trained
    Just did some reading on these nasty little critters.

    Due to their lifestyle, adults live in the large intestine, sbd females emerge to deposit up to 60000 eggs at a time around the anus, a fecal will probably not detect them. A piece of clear sticky tape stuck to the yellowish crusts will.
    These crusts are the cause for the itching and subsequent tail rubbing, where they end up on the surface the horse rubbed on, or fall to the ground where the horse pics them up when searching for food.

    Any type of dewormer kills the adults, according to recent studies.
    For relieving the itch, papertowels and warm water will work.
    Aside from dewormer, cleaning waterbuckets, feeder, the wall where the horse rubbed against and the stall(fresh bedding) is very important, since that's where the eggs are lurking.
    If it was my horse, I'd do the dewormer myself, clean well and have the horse on a regular deworming schedule.
    It takes 5 months for the eggs to develop into adults. Your horse probably reinfested herself.

    Since she has been dewormed before I doubt there is any danger for colic. But I'd ask my vet, just to be safe
         
        09-10-2012, 10:43 AM
      #13
    Super Moderator
    The blood test is only used to detect changes in the horses blood that indicate encysted worms and also tapeworms which mostly don't appear in fecal counts as they tend to stay attached to the lining. A fecal count shows what worms are actually present in the stomach and digestive system - these are the ones that in large numbers are a high risk of causing a blockage
    When you buy any horse you can only trust that the previous owners have followed a correct worming pattern - you have no proof of it and if I bought a horse that I found to be heavily infested then I would seriously doubt that it had been wormed at all or that it had been wormed constantly with the same active ingredient and the worms were resistant to it - which isn't correct worming procedure
    Febendazole will not kill tapeworm - or anything that has built up a resistance to it though it should still be effective against encysted worms.
    This link gives all of the current active chemicals used in wormers
    Active Chemical Ingredients in Wormers - Wormers Direct
         
        09-10-2012, 10:59 AM
      #14
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by poppy1356    
    Well since Powerpac is the only dewormer on the market that kills a very widespread range of worms, please tell me how you would go about getting rid of all the worms in an infested horse?

    When I got my mare in January she had been on the 8 week rotation of deworming. Come June we find out she is infested with worms. It doesn't matter the schedule if the worms were never properly taken care of in the first place. It is very easy for a horse that is on a rotational schedule to become infested with worms if they had them when the schedule was started.

    My mare was given Powerpac when she was infested with them. The vet, after drawing blood and an exam, concluded this to be the best way. She never even got runny poo.

    Now I'm not saying that everyone should go out and give their horse this stuff. I recommend talking with your vet as to if this is the best option. I do not see why people get their feathers all ruffled up over deworming. It's a simple concept, if the horse has worms, get rid of them.

    If you have an alternative to get rid of the worms completely, please tell. As of now I haven't found a product in the US that does what powerpac does.
    What you have described sounds like a resistance problem.....in other words the worms have changed their physical make up so that the wormer is no longer affective and you need to use a different wormer.

    So you need to do a fecal count prior to worming and then two weeks after worming do another one to see how many you killed.....there should be a significant change in the count...perferably zero......if not you need to go to a different wormer.

    I would recommend you go to thehorse.com and read all you can about worming.

    Super Nova
         
        09-10-2012, 11:11 AM
      #15
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Super Nova    
    What you have described sounds like a resistance problem.....in other words the worms have changed their physical make up so that the wormer is no longer affective and you need to use a different wormer.

    So you need to do a fecal count prior to worming and then two weeks after worming do another one to see how many you killed.....there should be a significant change in the count...perferably zero......if not you need to go to a different wormer.

    I would recommend you go to thehorse.com and read all you can about worming.

    Super Nova
    My horse didn't have a resistance problem. She was never dewormed for 18 years and when you just start on a deworming schedule without first killing off all the worms the regular dewormers do nothing.
         
        09-10-2012, 11:12 AM
      #16
    Super Moderator
    Desertwoman Were you talking about pinworms?
    Could well be them
    Equine Vet Blog: COW: Pinworms

    They have become an increasing problem as they are very resistant to wormers - one of the causes of tail scratching that gets overlooked

    Am I right in thinking that people can also get them?
         
        09-10-2012, 11:14 AM
      #17
    Yearling
    Thanks everyone for sharing your thoughts. Fecal sample dropped off this morning, as well as a "scraping" of the yellow crust and a couple of partial worms pulled off of her this morning. As many have suggested, I'm working with the vet closely and will definitely be taking his advice about next steps. I just came here to see if anyone had experienced anything similar, as I am trying to learn all I can about what might be going on (I've read everything I can find about worms in the past couple of weeks, I'm on worm overload myself right now!)

    I guess what I'm just having trouble understanding is how she could be loaded with worms. She's been at the same barn for 2+ years, all the horses there have been on a quarterly, rotational schedule; this is the first I've ever noticed the problem (even though my ownership just began a couple of months ago, I was leasing her previously); and no other horses are showing symptoms. While I have not been the one personally deworming her during this time (though you can bet I will be from now on!!), if the previous BM was letting horses get off schedule, wouldn't other horses be having similar problems? It just kills me to think that she's literally infested right now and it could have been prevented.
         
        09-10-2012, 11:16 AM
      #18
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jaydee    
    Desertwoman Were you talking about pinworms?
    Could well be them
    Equine Vet Blog: COW: Pinworms

    They have become an increasing problem as they are very resistant to wormers - one of the causes of tail scratching that gets overlooked

    Am I right in thinking that people can also get them?
    Jaydee, pinworms have been my very amateur guess, based on everything I've read, particularly the yellow crusty deposits.

    People can get pinworms, and early on in this experience, I convinced myself that I had them :) However, all my reading has indicated that horses get horse pinworms, and people get human pinworms. Anyone with a medical background can correct this assumption if it's wrong...
         
        09-10-2012, 11:17 AM
      #19
    Started
    If you were to test every horse on the farm, you would find that about 20% of the horses carry 80% of the worms. There was a good article on this at thehorse.com.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        09-10-2012, 11:21 AM
      #20
    Green Broke
    Yes what aforred said my vet also told me.

    Also like I said before, it doesn't matter the schedule if the original worms were never killed in the first place. A regular schedule if put in place on a horse that is loaded with worms will only kill a portion of them.
         

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