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Worming disaster-what did I do wrong?What do I do now?

This is a discussion on Worming disaster-what did I do wrong?What do I do now? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • A good wormer to use for horses as have missed a couple
  • What did I do wrong? I only showed that I care

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    07-21-2012, 11:21 PM
  #21
Weanling
No dewormer monthly. Giving her the same wormmer will only make it obsolite. Here is a nice calender that I use. I do a power dose once in fall and once in spring and check fecal before the power dose Deworming Rotation Schedule and Worm Facts.
     
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    07-21-2012, 11:46 PM
  #22
Showing
Relax, it's all good. She'll survive and you learned a valuable lesson. I know there are a lot of folks who still recommend deworming quarterly (4 times per year) with a set schedule of de-wormers. However, I am of the mind that you should just get fecals done a couple of times a year (spring and fall) and then administer the de-wormer you need to in order to take care of the worm load they are carrying...if they have one. There are a couple of my horses that haven't needed deworming in years because they don't have a worm count on a fecal. They are still slick and shiny and healthy. No idea if they have some weird immunity to worms or what. Then, there are others like my Taz that seem to have a pretty good load each time I have a fecal done on him .

Doing it that way, only deworming when needed, helps to eliminate the resistance buildup to the dewormers. It's just like infections in humans. People get antibiotics for every little thing, and then they don't use them right, and folks wonder how we ended up with MRSA.
     
    07-22-2012, 12:33 AM
  #23
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
Relax, it's all good. She'll survive and you learned a valuable lesson. I know there are a lot of folks who still recommend deworming quarterly (4 times per year) with a set schedule of de-wormers. However, I am of the mind that you should just get fecals done a couple of times a year (spring and fall) and then administer the de-wormer you need to in order to take care of the worm load they are carrying...if they have one. There are a couple of my horses that haven't needed deworming in years because they don't have a worm count on a fecal. They are still slick and shiny and healthy. No idea if they have some weird immunity to worms or what. Then, there are others like my Taz that seem to have a pretty good load each time I have a fecal done on him .

Doing it that way, only deworming when needed, helps to eliminate the resistance buildup to the dewormers. It's just like infections in humans. People get antibiotics for every little thing, and then they don't use them right, and folks wonder how we ended up with MRSA.

I never thought of that, great idea, its more ost effective and better for our horses tummies and well.... overall health. I might start doing this.
     
    07-22-2012, 12:47 AM
  #24
Trained
I seen the same huge roundworms come out of a yearling filly I bought, used the same stuff you used, pyrantel, as I read ivermectin too isn't effective on these. This filly probably had not been wormed at all before I bought her. I wormed her again in 2 weeks with the same stuff & seen a few more of the big white ugly things. After 2 months I had a fecal done, she was clear. The vet (this was over 20 years ago) gave me a schedule of rotation of wormers to use in a 3 year span.
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    07-22-2012, 04:23 AM
  #25
Yearling
You REALLY need to cut yourself some slack girl! Babies eat their momma's poop, they just do. They are wormy wormy wormy little things!!!! My 2 year old was wormed monthly until she hit a year. You were not neglecting your horse. Rotating wormer is important. I may have missed the part where it was said that this could have caused colic...??? Wonder how rescue horses don't colic when they've been truly neglected and FULL of worms for years. I don't think you did a thing wrong. Horses are hardy animals. She is just fine and will be just fine. Get a fecal done. Have a glass of wine and forgive yourself. It's not your fault she had worms. You helped her by getting them out. Think of yourself as the good guy. There's no way you could've known.
     
    07-22-2012, 08:10 AM
  #26
Foal
Thanks a million Dreamcatcher! I'm confused about what the roundworms are. I thought they are Ascarids and if I'm correct Ivermectin is suppose to kill them... I'll do some more research. I didn't think about using daily wormer also, but I'll give that a try too. This worms freaked me out like you wouldn't believe.
My sister-in-law's horses don't have any worms in their stools and don't have any symptoms to indicate that the do(although Wicca didn't have worms in her stool or any other symptoms...). My baby was at my sister-in-law's place for 3 months, because I read that it's best for her mental development to be in a herd. I've never saw her eat poop, but I'm sure she has. She was on a 2 acre pasture with other 4 horses and I wasn't able to pick up the poop as well as I'm doing now, but I did pick quite a bit of poop there and there were no worms in anybodys stool. My sister-in-law has had horses for over 40 years and she was as surprised as I was that my baby was totally super infested with them. I am an overprotective mom and I would have never imagined that something like this would happen to my kid. Something like this would never cross my mind not even in my nightmares.
This has been my biggest screw up since I've been a "fuzzy kid" mom, and I hope my last.
     
    07-22-2012, 08:39 AM
  #27
Yearling
Ivermectin does not do round worms, so she likely had a large burden (even before you got her )that wasn't addressed until now. Don't freak out, some babies get that way and you clearly haven't neglected her. This is a learning experience and alls well that ends well. The good news is you didn't colic her when she passed them which sometimes happens with babies who get a large roundworm burden. A good deworming rule of thumb is to do it 4 times a year, Ivermectin is always your late fall dewormer so that you are sure to get the bots. Pyrantel twice a year and a praziquantal product for tapeworms once a year. The ideal situation of course is doing fecal exams quarterly as well but always use a praziquantel once a year as tapes often don't show up on fecal exam but we know from necropsy that many of these horses still have large numbers in their ileal cecal oriface. Good luck!
     
    07-22-2012, 08:40 AM
  #28
Foal
I had the same feeling, Smrobs, that's what I've always done with my dogs, but my vet, the breeder and my sister-in-law told me to go ahead and worm her, because babies don't have as much resistance to parasites as adults do. I obviously had the wrong info about not changing the wormers often. I should have read more about it, but I've never had problems with parasites with my dogs, even though they go to parks, dog shows, pretty much everywhere. I've been stressing over her diet, her hoof trimming, training, companionship, etc.
And Waresbear, your filly had been neglected, with a horse that had not have regular care I wouldn't have been surprised, but when you think you are doing everything you need to and find out that you're an idiot, I can't explain how that feels. I'm not good at many things, but I'm (usually) a good mom to my fuzzy kids. I love them, I understand them and I pride myself on being a great mom.
Thank a lot guys! You've been very helpful!
     
    07-22-2012, 08:50 AM
  #29
Yearling
I don't know if it's approved for foals, but I use a daily dewormer (strongid c2x) and then just have a fecal done a couple of times a year to see if anything has slipped by the strongid, and then (if it has, which it hasn't yet) I (would) choose a paste dewormer depending on what kind of worms the fecal turned up.

Don't knock yourself too hard - worms are "natural" for horses. Undesirable, yes, but they've been living with them for millenia, and the horse system can take a fair amount of that before it becomes a huge problem.
     
    07-22-2012, 08:51 AM
  #30
Green Broke
You didn't screw up & I doubt your dewormer failed due to resistance.
I've linked an article on the life cycle of round worms & others. Dewormer only kills the worms once they have turned into worms. It probably took them a few months to get where the dewormer-any dewormer- would kill them. There are encysted parasites which are different though.
In other words, the worms weren't killed until they could be.
That's why we give the dewormers at intervals, to break the life cycle & get them when most vulnerable.
You may have wasted a bit of money giving a dewormer before the worms were mature enough to kill but you didn't screw up.
You coming here & asking shows you are a good horse owner.
Strongyles, Roundworms, Tapeworms, & More: Common Internal Equine Parasites
     

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