Worming - OVERDUE! Help!
 
 

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Worming - OVERDUE! Help!

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  • Horse hasnt been wormed
  • Horse time off after worming

 
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    04-13-2011, 07:04 AM
  #1
Foal
Exclamation Worming - OVERDUE! Help!

Long story cut short:

I found out his evening that my horse hasn't been wormed for at least a year. I'm desperate on help as i've heard about horses becoming very sick from just suddenly being put on wormers after time off..

Any help? I'm going in to a local horse store tomorrow for help, but would love to come in with some knowledge.

My poor horse. :(
     
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    04-13-2011, 07:09 AM
  #2
Banned
I think you may be overreacting.

It would help to know your geographical area, and what your horse's stable and pasture conditions have been for the past year to estimate what his potential parasite load may be.

The current thinking in my area is that the old practice of worming on a set schedule was overkill, and was setting up resistance to deworming medications. Vet practices are recommending that you do a fecal count before worming to ensure 1.) that the horse needs worming at all 2.) target the dewormer product to the parasite.

Since you're concerned about the horse's possible adverse reaction, why not get a fecal floatation done so you'll know exactly what the horse's parasite load is and then get a vet's recommendation about how to treat?
     
    04-13-2011, 07:16 AM
  #3
Foal
I live in Australia, and my horse is grazed 24/7.

I always have problems with keeping weight on her, any my reason for sudden fretting is my realisation that this is probably directly linked to her lack of worming.
     
    04-13-2011, 07:20 AM
  #4
Started
My suggestion would be to contact your vet and find out what they recommend doing and bring up your concern for her weight issues.
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    04-13-2011, 07:24 AM
  #5
Banned
Sorry, I'm in the Eastern US, so things may be very different

How big is her grazing and how well is it maintained? Meaning is the pasture rotated or dragged on a regular basis?

If a horse is in a large area that isn't overgrazed, their parasite load may be small. If the grazing frequently has standing manure and the horse grazes over the top of manure, well, then, yes, you probably do have a parasite problem.

I am really, really particular about dragging and rotating my paddocks, currently I worm 4X a year, each time before moving the horses to a clean paddock, and my vet tells me *that* may be too often to deworm given the paddock maintenence.

If you're still worried about adverse reaction to the wormer, I would still do the fecal floatation. It only costs about $20 US, and you can drive the sample to the vet clinic or lab yourself.
     
    04-13-2011, 07:27 AM
  #6
Foal
Oh okay! Well she's one of 4 horses in a huge paddock. Unfortunately the place I agist her is quite slack so there is no roation of paddocks.. but to be honest it's hardly neccessary in mine. There is always a large amount of grass and is never run down!

Vet's in my area are ridiculously expensive. It's already $100 to get one to you..
     
    04-13-2011, 07:59 AM
  #7
Trained
You don't actually have to have the vet out to do a fecal egg count, you just bring in about 3-4 horse 'apples' and they will do the testing at the vet. Don't worry yourself too much, about 50% of horses can control their parasite load on their own.
     
    04-13-2011, 08:44 AM
  #8
dee
Started
Exactly right. It actually takes a fairly heavy worm load to have much of an effect on a horse. In an un-interefered with ecosystem, parasites do little damage in a healthy animal - it's not in their best interest to do so as it affects their food supply.

I would have the fecal done - you may be in for a pleasant surprise. We've had five horses in our lot all winter, and while they aren't exactly worm free, their count is surprisingly low, and we haven't wormed them since fall. (I know, BAD horsey mom!)
     
    04-13-2011, 10:25 AM
  #9
Super Moderator
I have dewormed horses that have not been dewormed in their lifetime and they were mature saddle horses when I got them.

Young horses under 5 are the most prone to have problems with heavy worm loads as they are much more prone to Ascrids or roundworms. I have seen weanlings that contained more than a 5 gallon bucket full of roundworms. These were found on post Mortimer exams. The 2 foals that I posted were slick, fat and their owners had been feeding them well -- probably too much -- but had neglected to deworm them.

If you really think your horse could be THAT wormy, I would either bring in a fresh fecal ball to your Vet and have a fecal egg count done.

Or I would give 1/2 dose of dewormer and follow up with a full dose a week later.
     

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de-worming, feeding, worming, worms

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