Wormy-Horse? - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Wormy-Horse?

This is a discussion on Wormy-Horse? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Is psyllium ok for my yearling
  • Is it ok to put out a wormy horse with other horses

Like Tree1Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    03-02-2012, 02:43 AM
  #11
Yearling
I'm glad. Make sure that you're feeding by weight and not volume (6 lbs versus 2 flakes, etc.). What's this guy's name, and what's his story?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    03-02-2012, 03:05 AM
  #12
Foal
He is, he's on a good diet, just not getting the nutrients from it, I myself have never had a horse battle worm issues, so this is a new one to me with the condition he's in
His name is vascoole..we don't know a whole lot about him other than he raced at a local track.. he was extremely head shy when my friend first got him, it took a couple weeks for him to let anyone pet him even on his neck. Since then he has come a long way with that, he seems to be a real sweetheart, absolutely loves children and enjoys being hand-walked down the trails with my OTTB and quarter horse.
     
    03-02-2012, 01:12 PM
  #13
Yearling
Hmm... Do you know about deworming horses? The rotation schedule? Every horse needs to be dewormed about every two to three months. You don't deworm with the same type of wormer every time. For example, you could rotate from ivermectin to praziquantel, febendazole, strongid, moxidectin, and pyrantel pamoate... then repeat! Keep the broad spectrum dewormers rotating through, and don't use dewormers with the same active ingredient within immediate succession of each other. All horses, not just horses who turn up "wormy."

Deworm all of the horses that share a pasture with him – horses will continue to pass worms to each other, even when a horse is dewormed...

He's not being ridden, is he?
     
    03-02-2012, 01:37 PM
  #14
Weanling
A bad case of sand in the gut can leave a horse looking like that too, the build up of sand acts like sand paper damaging the gut, the gut then cannot absorb nutrients like normal. Does this horse have diarrhoea on a regular basis? If so it could indicate he is trying to flush sand from his system. Please ask your vet about the possibility of sand in your horse's gut, it's not always the first thing to spring to your vet's mind.

I live in a very sandy area and my ignorant neighbour was feeding my horses his grass clippings by throwing the clippings over the fence on to the ground>:[ For months I wormed, fed, gave psyllium, and had the vet out trying to put weight on my boys, but nothing worked finally one of them colicked severely and an ultra sound showed a ton of sand in my horse. My vet said that the psyllium was too little to clear as much sand as my boys were eating, he had me double the recommended dosage and supplement it with a pro-biotic to increase gut motility.
It was while was staying home from work with my VERY SICK pony that I finally caught my neighbour dumping his clippings over my fence. I threw a ring-tailed fit! Once they stopped eating the sand, it took a year and a half before I finally got all the sand out and stopped the diarrhoea with the help of a fantastic sand clearing product called Equi-sure PLUS.
     
    03-02-2012, 02:32 PM
  #15
Foal
Yes, my horses are on a rotational deworming schedule, and have been since I have had them. This horse has been started on one, it was the previous owner that used the same type and only twice a year..the other horses in the pasture with him now are not ours, so we cannot deworm them. He is not being ridden, just handwalked
     
    03-02-2012, 02:35 PM
  #16
Yearling
I'm glad! Poor guy :\

Let us know what the vet says!
     
    03-02-2012, 03:21 PM
  #17
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by AfleetAgain    
Yes, my horses are on a rotational deworming schedule, and have been since I have had them. This horse has been started on one, it was the previous owner that used the same type and only twice a year..the other horses in the pasture with him now are not ours, so we cannot deworm them. He is not being ridden, just handwalked
If he didn't look like that when he was purchased & was only getting dewormed twice a year it's because the previous owner had parasites under control, unlike at the new place. I only deworm twice a year & fecal tests are always negative. New horses do not go on pasture until they have clear fecals also.
Your friend's barn needs to improve it's worm management but as they probably won't she needs to do the rotation as suggested even if the others don't. At least the worms won't get a stronghold in her horse as frequent deworming breaks up the life cycle.
Personally I would move my horse to a better place but I understand that is not always an option.
     
    03-02-2012, 08:49 PM
  #18
Foal
The vet confirmed the horse is a bit wormy, but said alot of it is hay belly...he also wants him to take a moxidectin dewormer at the end of the month, and start adding corn oil to his diet, hopefully here soon I can post an update of a healthier horse
     
    03-02-2012, 08:51 PM
  #19
Yearling
Go for Quest Plus, not Quest. ;)
     
    03-02-2012, 09:00 PM
  #20
Foal
Ok, thank you!
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What is Wormy Dog? Simply Hot N Rockin Reining 13 08-27-2011 03:39 PM
Hay belly or Wormy? Also is she too thin? Gidget Horse Health 7 07-16-2011 12:41 PM
Does she look wormy to you? riccil0ve Horse Health 20 04-23-2010 02:45 AM
Rebel is skinny, dull, and wormy =/ SorrelHorse Horse Health 11 03-21-2010 09:01 PM
Wormy Horse? Spastic_Dove Horse Health 15 12-16-2009 03:22 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0