Your Opinion Please - cold back or something else?
   

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Your Opinion Please - cold back or something else?

This is a discussion on Your Opinion Please - cold back or something else? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Horse legs buckling cold backed

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  • 2 Post By Phly
  • 2 Post By Foxhunter

 
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    05-25-2013, 02:01 AM
  #1
Foal
Cool Your Opinion Please - cold back or something else?

Hi

We have rescued pony who has been with us for 2 months now she was pretty poor when she came but with careful feeding, vitamins and lungeing she has come on in leaps and bounds, she is now fairly well covered and has a bit of muscle tone.
She is having vitamin E and selenium in her feed and we are massaging her back and croup muscles daily with an equine aloe vera gel.
She is a bit of an odd shape, very long in the back with a leg at each corner.
When we let her into the sand school she is full of life, galloping around, bucking and rolling and will follow you anywhere you go, if you jump a jump she jumps it after you, she is a real sweetie.
We have found a strange phenomenon with her, she is a little restless about having a saddle on (and we think she has had badly fitting tack in the past) but nothing you would be too concerned about and will lunge happily tacked up, if you then get on and ride her she is great, we have just started hacking out and doing a bit of slow hill work to strengthen her muscles, however if you tack her up and try to get on immediately her back legs buckle and it looks as though she is going to sit on the floor. This has happened twice and both times we have trotted her up and down, turned her in a few tight circles and then got on again and she is fine!
I have never had much experience with cold backed horses and I'm not sure this fits the bill, we live in the wilds of Spain and although we have access to a vet (who has looked her over and physically she seems fine) there is not much help around.
Anyone got any ideas on what this might be or what we can do to help her over it please, however if we have to lunge her before she is ridden for the rest of her days then that's what we'll do!?
     
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    05-25-2013, 02:19 AM
  #2
Started
Huh, that's definitely odd.

All the "cold backs" I've had the pleasure of being around would rather let you on just to throw ya off! That's not a rule, just experiences.

My first thought would be tight muscles in the hind, which after a lil warm up feel better? Idk. Calcium and magnesium are important for muscle contracting and relaxing.

Possibly research that?
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Lizzielogs and Merlot like this.
     
    05-25-2013, 02:55 AM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phly    
Huh, that's definitely odd.

All the "cold backs" I've had the pleasure of being around would rather let you on just to throw ya off! That's not a rule, just experiences.

My first thought would be tight muscles in the hind, which after a lil warm up feel better? Idk. Calcium and magnesium are important for muscle contracting and relaxing.

Possibly research that?
Posted via Mobile Device
It's odd isn't it!
Thank you very much, calcium and magnesium will be easy to find here I'll have a bit of a research on the internet and see what sort of dosage is recommended and if it will be compatible with the Vitamin E and selenium, spect it would be OK though.
As she is getting fitter by the week I am hoping whatever this is will slowly ease out as her back end becomes stronger, as far as I can see she is in no pain and as she is getting fitter she is more and more forward going wanting to lead the ride! Also I wouldn't imagine horses in pain can buck as high as her nor roll and jump up so quickly!
     
    05-25-2013, 01:23 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
I would say that this is from poor fitting saddles - she is expecting it to hurt and reacts as if it does.
When lunged prior to riding she has a chance to warm up thereby releasing tension, and has felt the saddle on her and knows it is comfortable.

I have just posted 'Four `square' try the exercises and tests and see what reactions you get.
loosie and Lizzielogs like this.
     
    05-25-2013, 02:00 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
I would say that this is from poor fitting saddles - she is expecting it to hurt and reacts as if it does.
When lunged prior to riding she has a chance to warm up thereby releasing tension, and has felt the saddle on her and knows it is comfortable.

I have just posted 'Four `square' try the exercises and tests and see what reactions you get.

Thank you Foxhunter, I think you are absolutely correct, this is hard to describe but bear with me.
Remember we are talking about a Spanish pony here and they are not renowned for their treatment of animals. When she first came a couple of months ago if you stood facing her at the girth area and ran your eight fingers down from her spine quite firmly across the longissimus dorsi towards the ribcage your fingers 'fell' into a massive dip before reaching the intercostals, we have massaged her daily if she is lunged or twice daily if she is ridden with an equine rub and this 'dip' has now closed up and you can feel the muscle which was withered under your fingertips, the muscle is still quite hard and tense but is getting more pliable all the time. The site of the damage is where a vaquero saddle (and a badly fitting one at that) would lie on her back.
Would you recommend any different treatment?
I am new to the site and don't understand the reference to your post of 'Four 'square', sorry to be a numpty!

Regards Lizzielogs
     
    05-25-2013, 02:11 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
I have just posted 'Four `square' try the exercises and tests and see what reactions you get.
I have redeemed myself and found your post Foxhunter!!
Am reading it now and will try the exercises

Thanks xx
     
    05-31-2013, 09:39 PM
  #7
Weanling
I doubt two months is enough time to put weight and muscle on that pony. My friends have two ponies they're fostering. They came in pretty malnourished, but not starving. It's been three months and there's still no way they're even close to ready to have a saddle on them. There's not enough muscle to keep the saddle from pressing on the ribs, causing discomfort. And these ponies are grained daily, with free choice, quality hay, on 24/7 green pastures.
     
    05-31-2013, 11:14 PM
  #8
Yearling
Lizzie logs, along with magnesium, if your horse is grazing grass she may need salt - and not just a salt lick.
     
    06-01-2013, 01:32 AM
  #9
Foal
Thank you Rascalboy and Merlot.

The pony was 'ridden' when she came and although she is being tacked up now we are leading her out from another horse and walking her up and down hills (of which we have plenty) for 30 minutes a day, yesterday when we put the saddle on her she didn't even look round.
Thanks also for the salt comment.
Lizzielogs
     
    06-01-2013, 01:47 AM
  #10
Yearling
You're welcome Lizzielogs - this is one of the most needed least fed nutrients a horse needs I feed 2 Tbsp per DAY in their feed. This is to balance out the high potassium inherent in green growing grass. Essential
     

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