YOUR responsibilities as a horse owner. - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

YOUR responsibilities as a horse owner.

This is a discussion on YOUR responsibilities as a horse owner. within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        06-10-2009, 03:39 PM
      #11
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MIEventer    
    About the trimming -

    Nelson and I are now paying for 1 year of errors made by our previous farrier. Most people think that TB's are born with natural horrible feet, which I believed for years as well, and my previous farrier kept telling me that too "There's nothing I can do, he is just how he is, work around it" - and that's garbage.

    When I bought Nelson and for the year I owned him - his toes were long, no heels what-so-ever and very thin soles. So I had him shod all round with pads. I was forking out big money for this.....without even realizing how incorrect it was.

    Nelson had hock issues, he would come out of his stall in the A.M for turn out with swollen ankles. I thought he had to begin Legend Injections. I had him on joint suppliments. His movement wasn't that great either - I had to ride hard just to get him to even track up. He couldn't keep a shoe on if his life depended on it.

    Until - one fateful day, he lost a shoe, yet again - and I called my farrier at the time to come out and replace it, but he couldn't because he was on his way to Texas for vacation - so I had to find another farrier right away.

    Due to this, I learnt allot! I have a new farrier, and I learnt that correct angles and correct trimming to allow blood flow, is what makes a healthy hoof.

    Guess what - Nelson now has THICK soles. He actually has HEELS and his toes were brought back immensely - he is no longer on joint suppliments. He doesn't have any hock issues, his movement is HUGE and LOFTY - and a much happier horse.

    - - - - So it isn't just having their feet done, it is having the right farrier, who is educated and up to date on all techniques, so that your horse has blood flow, correct angles according to their pasturns and hips/shoulders - - - - -

    But it took that 1 day of he throwing his shoe, to be educated on how it should be done.

    Just thought I'd share that.
    I don't know why farriers who don't know what they are doing bother trying to balance a horse and trim their precious feet.

    For about a year, I was trimming Daisy's (and my other horses') feet with the farrier that the boarding stable had come out. After EVERY trim, Daisy was lame for about a day. So sore that she didn't want to do anything, not even go out for turn out.

    I addressed this with the farrier, and he said it's because her feet are so small, blah blah blah, that's just how she was, nothing he could do about it. For some reason, I accepted this.

    Then both my girls got huge abscesses in their feet, and were lame for about a month.

    I decided to switch farriers. Called my vet and had him recommend one.

    Guess what - Daisy doesn't go lame after every trim anymore. My new farrier knows exactly how much to trim on her tiny little feet, and knows where to stop, and how to balance her.

    Farriers who make excuses should not trim horse's feet.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        06-10-2009, 03:41 PM
      #12
    Showing
    This was a frustrated rant, one that was provoked by reading yet another Craigslist ad for a horse for sale for $10 because they couldn't feed it any longer.

    While some of you may not agree with my points, they are my points; take them or leave them.
    I do think it's something that new horse owners or potential horse owners should read; it's an eye-opener.

    Regarding feet - I should have said a series of trims, however depending on the horse it can result in a very long and tough road to recovery.

    Regarding the vet - no, I never said a vet should be called for every bump and scrape, but when the horse needs a vet out, you need to be able to provide that service to him. I specifically said "if you don't know how to deal with it."
    My horse is insured. I pay a flat fee every year to keep him insured. This means that I don't need to have tens of thousands of dollars to spare for him because he's covered.
    I do think you should have enough in the bank to euthanize a horse and dispose of the body, unless slaughter is an option for you.


         
        06-10-2009, 03:45 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    Totally agree The reason why I have my horse is that the lady who bred and trained her couldn't afford her. She is a great rider/trainer but she just kept breeding when horses weren't selling. She got into financial trouble and the horses were not getting proper hay or feed or vet care, etc. Friends tried to help but she was being ridiculous, not wanting to sell horses for reasonable prices, etc. Shortly after taking the horse to help out she had to have several of her horses put down because of bad hay, digestive issues, etc.

    I think insurance is a great idea too
         
        06-10-2009, 04:02 PM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    ...I've had to hit the credit cards on more then one occasion to pay for an emergency call... for horses and dogs alike... I do have a SMALL amount of money set aside, but it isn't enough for a major medical emergency.

    It is a really, really good thought though and a terrific suggestion, if anyone has the ability to squirrel money away....
         
        06-10-2009, 04:38 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    I feel where your coming from JDI, but don't you think your preaching to the converted for the most part on this board? Yes there are a lot of young ones on here, (at least I hope they're young judging by their choice of words.....) that could really benefit from picking up a book or two and reading up on basic care. Some of the questions on here just make me want to hit my head repeatedly on my desk. BUT hey, isn't that why us "old timers" sign up on these forums for...... to maybe learn something new ourselves and to try and impart some knowledge on the less than educated. ( I use that word for lack of a better one..... no offense meant)

    I think this blog should be daily reading for EVERY horse owner out there. While I may not agree with everything she has to say I can appreciate her devotion to trying to make things better.

    Fugly Horse of the Day

    Like I said before I get your frustration, the little guy I'm working with right now was locked in a barn without food and water for 4 plus months. He survived licking the walls and recycling his poop. The kicker is right outside the barn they were renting was a huge pasture.....so tell me why??

    The old mare we have was apparently a biter, so instead of dealing with that the people who had her took a rock and knocked out all her teeth.......Tell me why?

    It sucks, the economy sucks, there are a lot of aholes out there that shouldn't have horse's and then there are some really good people who are just having some real hard times. It doesn't mean they don't know anything about horse's.

    I would think this post would of been better placed in the Breeding section...... I can't go to that section or I'd be telling people off all day......... We don't need any more horse's!!!!!!!!
         
        06-10-2009, 05:03 PM
      #16
    Showing
    I did figure that this would get read most by the people who don't need to read it, but maybe, just maybe, someone who should read it, will?

    We are of very like minds, G and K, regarding the breeding thread
         
        06-10-2009, 05:09 PM
      #17
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    I did figure that this would get read most by the people who don't need to read it, but maybe, just maybe, someone who should read it, will?

    We are of very like minds, G and K, regarding the breeding thread
    There are A LOT Of people that read this board that don't belong to this board and I'd imagine there are a bunch of people that are new to horses or interested in getting into horses so this post is a great topic. Plus I'd imagine there are more than a few people here that need to read it as a reminder.

    Quite honestly, I'm a bit shocked at a lot of the pictures I see on this forum where the horse has really crappy feet. They don't say No Hoof No Horse lightly. It's very true. While it is hard to find reliable farriers, you should always have a list of people as a back up if your farrier flakes out. There just is NO excuse for your horse not having proper hoof care. NONE.

    Great topic. I have different opinions on some of what you wrote but I think they were very good points and thanks for taking the time to write them up.
         
        06-10-2009, 05:17 PM
      #18
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    I did figure that this would get read most by the people who don't need to read it, but maybe, just maybe, someone who should read it, will?
    Here's hoping. Even it makes one person think twice and then think twice again it's a good thing!
         
        06-10-2009, 06:34 PM
      #19
    Showing
    Not trying to defend JDI (she can perfectly do it herself ), but I think it's a great "summarized" reading for the people, who consider getting a horse. Yes, a little bit too emotional, and a little exaggeration here and there, but... Too often they have no idea at all HOW much it cost.

    I don't buy super-puper expensive feed for my horses, as well as I'm not doing say teeth floating 4 times a year (lol!), but even reasonable expenses (floating once/year, shots/coggins, trim every 8 weeks, and hay/grain) are still pretty big expense. And I'm not paying for boarding (which is super expensive if you want a nice barn with the ring).
         
        06-10-2009, 07:34 PM
      #20
    Showing
    Thank you to those who understand where I'm coming from - KV, G&K, Solon, Farmpony, MIE and ILMP - if I missed you, I'm sorry.
    Yes, this is an emotional list.
    Yes, it was due to draw attention and probably get some tempers flared because of its emotionality.
    However, it was written with good intentions.

    I am tired of seeing skinny horses, horses with bad feet, horses that need veterinary care and people say "oh, well I didn't know" or "it's too expensive."

    Times are tough. Those effected do have to take a loss somewhere, and sometimes it takes a big person to say - look, I can't afford this, I need to let this horse go for now and get back into it later on, or find a different situation for this horse temporarily.

    When you take on ANY animal, you are taking its life into your hands, and you must care for it as such
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Best breed for a first time horse owner? AshleyNewman Horse Breeds 37 03-25-2009 10:31 AM
    Advice for a new horse owner: Moxie Horse Talk 7 01-31-2009 11:56 AM
    Help - New Horse Owner Michigan Horse Mom Horse Tack and Equipment 15 11-14-2008 11:45 AM
    First time horse owner Hot_to_trot78 Horse Breeds 19 07-12-2008 10:39 AM
    New horse owner taclyn Meet the Community 11 06-29-2008 06:04 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:05 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0