Thinking of being a trainer. - Page 3
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Resources > Horse Jobs

Thinking of being a trainer.

This is a discussion on Thinking of being a trainer. within the Horse Jobs forums, part of the Horse Resources category

    Like Tree8Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        03-11-2012, 12:08 PM
      #21
    Green Broke
    I'm not sure I can say this without it coming across as rude, so I will just say it.

    In my personal opinion, someone who is just being taught to lunge has no business trying to train other people's horses.
    NicoleS11 likes this.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        03-11-2012, 12:49 PM
      #22
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by HowClever    
    I'm not sure I can say this without it coming across as rude, so I will just say it.

    In my personal opinion, someone who is just being taught to lunge has no business trying to train other people's horses.
    Did you read the rest of it, or just read the part about me lunging? I know a lot in other areas, I just don't know everything. I stated I wasn't doing it now, I'd be doing it much later, after some years of straight training for my own self.

    I know I'm not coming across as a super, awesome, experienced rider. But I'm not trying to come off as that. Not right now.
         
        03-11-2012, 01:12 PM
      #23
    Trained
    I believe you posted you have worked with a trainer/and or working with a trainer. Continue to do so, work at a breeding farm & ride some stallions, work with a coach. You will soon have the skills neccessary to start a colt, world needs more suckers, oops, sorry I mean trainers. I am smart, I quit before I broke anything that couldn't be fixed.
         
        03-11-2012, 08:47 PM
      #24
    Weanling
    Thanks for the tip... I guess. I can't decide if you're just trying to joke or not. Heh.
         
        03-12-2012, 07:54 PM
      #25
    Weanling
    You just learned how to lunge ... yeah I would not be PAYING you to ride my horse.

    Much less "train" it. Do you understand the importance of a good FOUNDATION and ground work? Like seriously? And are you a teenager? I would not hire a person who cannot legally hold liability insurance. Which you would need to have.

    Your going to create more problems than you solve at this point. Go work for as many trainers as possible. Ride as MANY horses as possible. You DO need to be a super duper excellent rider to be a trainer. You just DO. What do you know that will qualify you to be a trainer?

    You obviously do not know ground work. (i.e. Lunging - btw, you let that pony get off very easily with that chunk out of your leg, with me, he would have met jesus that day) Have you ever handled a stallion? Try it.

    Now, I am not saying you can't do it. Any "good" or "firm" rider can correct minor behavioral problems, but I by no means would consider you able to raise, break and train babies. And I am not being mean, I am simply saying that you have so so so much to learn. And then when you HAVE learned you need to train some of your own horses, and then sell them. When you create a good product, people will ask for you. It is just MORE than being a good rider.

    Some things for you to research if you insist on doing this ...
    - GROUNDWORK!
    - Dressage
    - Lateral Work
    - Ground Driving
    - Flexing
    - Manners
    - Saddle Fitting
    - Tack Knowledge (Any horse should be able to work in a plain snaffle and be supple, soft, responsive and correct < research all those terms too)
    - Horse Maturation
    - How Horses Think!

    And so much more that I cannot even think to start listing. Please do not take this the wrong way. You can get there, I just do not see you there right now.
    Stoddard likes this.
         
        03-12-2012, 08:34 PM
      #26
    Weanling
    I know a lot. Just because I didn't know how to lunge doesn't mean I'm stupid. I just never had the opportunity to learn lunging. I've watched lunging a lot, read about it, and apparently I'm a flippin' natural. I've worked in round pins very successfully, but I hate doing so because you never know when a horse could slip or catch his leg while bucking (and I only did it when Nancy told me to do so). I really, really love to learn how to ride Dressage, but I don't know that I can at my barn. I'm waiting until I learn all I can where I'm already at.

    Yes, I have handled a stallion before. I was rightfully scared ****less, but I didn't show it and I made him mind his manners while I had my hands on that lead-rope. There's always at least one stallion around the ranch, and I swear they're all more well mannered on the lead than half the gelding or mares tend to be. I know that's just because most are older and have been taught well, though.

    I used to flex my older mare's fore legs a little and stretch them forward carefully so I could make sure she was doing good, especially when it got colder.

    I have tack knowledge. I'm no expert by any means, but I know the basics and, well, my memory isn't good enough to remember what bits are called.

    Like I said, I know I'm nothing anyone would want to hire. Right now I "train" Nancy's horses for free. AKA, I get on and work them until they're easy enough to ride for others. Right now my projects are a mother and daughter who need to become trail ponies. The daughter was amazing today, and the mother is starting to come around. Lots of separation anxiety though from the mother, so she keeps trying to haul butt to the gate. Heh, so I made her stay in the opposite end for a few minutes.

    I know how to teach manners. I've lead around too many horses who wanted to walk on me, bite me, or jump around like a moron. One broke my toe. He stayed off my feet after that. The mini that bit my leg didn't bite too **** hard - there was no marks. I did break him of it. He was a year old stally that was adorable and lovable, but ornery than hell. And I always get on every horse I fall off of again that day.

    I know falling off and getting back on doesn't prove skill, but I think it proves I'm determined enough. And I'm kinda thinking that's what my trainer likes about me. I can't tell you how many times she had told me to get on someone's horse while in the middle of a lesson (a few years ago) when most days that rider could out ride me. I guess it's because I've fallen enough to know there's no point in being scared if you're going to get on a horse at all. That just makes it worse.

    Also, thanks for replying. Your bluntness reminds me of Nancy, haha. I've got basics, but it's a bit all over. But you gave me a bit of a list. If you want, message me a whole list and I'll save it. I'm taking this seriously.
         
        03-12-2012, 10:56 PM
      #27
    Weanling
    Most ranch horse trainers, never once lunge a horse. I have watched many many horses started who were never once lunged. I have purchased horses who were in thier teens who had honestly thousands of miles on them who had never once seen a lunge line.

    You might be surprised how few people actually know how to properly lunge.
         
        03-13-2012, 10:29 AM
      #28
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by yadlim    
    You might be surprised how few people actually know how to properly lunge.
    Honestly, the only people I've seen around the horse ranch around here lunge, are those who know how to from other places, or those who were taught by Nancy or her niece. Basically, those she dubs ready to ground work a horse.

    My next step is to learn how to train a horse to lunge for the first time, which I get to do later on this week.

    I love learning something new every day I step foot on that ranch.
         
        03-13-2012, 11:19 AM
      #29
    Green Broke
    Maybe I can give my 2cents considering im paying over 43k a year to become a "trainer". Im getting my bachelors of science in western riding and equine business management.

    I can still remember the first time I ever loped a horse, I had this overwhelming feeling of fireworks shooting out of every part of my body. I still get the chills thinking about it. That's the point when I knew that's what I wanted to do with my life, I didnt care what it took. I just had no idea /how/ to go about doing something like that.

    The thing is you need to have a passion and a love for the horse. Not just a horse, but horses in general. It takes a certain type of person to make a good trainer. Alot like professional singers, you must have the raw talent and the passion to make it. It takes years of hard work and dedication.

    Just like anything you must learn to crawl before you can learn to run. Which takes years and years. I was discussing moving hips with Clark Bradley (who is in the AQHA hall of fame) he told me "I was doing this wrong for years, it must have taken me 10 years of training before I finally figured out how to do it right". You literally never stop learning in his business.

    You also must realize that there are thousands of other horse related jobs out there. Many that have to do with riding aswell. Alot of people who are interested in making horses their career automatically think "trainer". But not everyone can make the cut, and that's ok.

    There is a girl who graduated from my school who ponys horses on the track for a living. She has 2 pony horses, rides one half the day, and the other the other half. She gets 25$ per horse she ponys. That's really good money if you pony enough horses in a day. Its those kind of jobs that most people don't think about when considering a career in horses.

    My suggestion would be keep going in the direction your going. Keep up with your trainer. Listen to anyone who will talk to you, and soak it up like a sponge. Seminars, videos, reading, etc.. I know there are alot of people who are anti video & book, but I feel like you can learn something from everyone. Sure its much more informative and useful if you go there and watch in person. Or if your actually getting a lesson yourself. But educating yourself no matter how you go about doing so is never a bad thing.

    Maybe one day you'll become the trainer you want to be, or maybe you wont. Either way its important to do what you love and love what you do. It is said if you love what you do you will never work a day in your life. Goodluck!
    yadlim likes this.
         
        03-13-2012, 12:01 PM
      #30
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by .Delete.    
    Maybe I can give my 2cents considering im paying over 43k a year to become a "trainer". Im getting my bachelors of science in western riding and equine business management.
    Thank you for your perspective! I am going to read as much as possible. Nancy literally has a book in every angle. She has books on horse health, horse body function, horse thinking, horse training, veterinary manuals, farrier books, and the little color and breed books that everyone likes staring at.

    I'm thinking of asking to borrow her vet books since I'm also going to be a vet assistant, and of course I wouldn't mind borrowing a book or two in everything else. I've found that magazines are also a good way to get a little brief explanation of some things. I actually just learned the other day that my trainer's husband actually taught me a harsher way of cinching a horse. Now I know how to do it more gently to avoid my horse becoming "girthy," and I'm going to use it from now on. Last year, a friend who trains for an Arabian breeder (champions no less) and does her own personal training, taught me to put air under the pad so it had space to move into a comfortable place as I rode, rather than becoming uncomfortable.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    To get a trainer, or to not get a trainer. THAT is the question! Cowgirls Boots Western Riding 1 11-03-2011 07:37 AM
    Thinking about getting a TWH hhtoussaint Gaited Horses 25 10-13-2010 11:21 PM
    Trainer did not show up, correct thinking or not Citrus Horse Training 4 04-10-2010 06:53 AM
    Dressage trainer or Arab trainer? knaskedov Dressage 7 01-04-2010 09:20 PM
    WANTED - ASSISTANT TRAINER S to NATURAL HORSEMANSHIP TRAINER Lolabydream Natural Horsemanship 0 03-23-2009 05:27 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:23 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0