BO Do you have a Animal abuse clause for boarders? - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Resources > Horse Law

BO Do you have a Animal abuse clause for boarders?

This is a discussion on BO Do you have a Animal abuse clause for boarders? within the Horse Law forums, part of the Horse Resources category
  • If you don't treat epm how long will the horse live
  • What blood test do they do on horses forum

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    10-25-2011, 12:49 PM
  #11
mls
Trained
Our contract states we will call the vet in the case of an emergency and the owner will be billed by the vet clinic.

Do we recommend the owner call the vet - and they don't - sure. Abuse - no. Stupid and or cheap - yes. If they don''t follow what you consider to be the rules of your facility, you have the right to ask them to leave.

I have to say - the story about the brand new horse owner pulling the horse over on an incline with the riders exact weight and the degree of the incline was not necessary.

As far as the EPM goes - new owner could go back to previous owner and suggest they knew horse was positive when the horse was sold.

Watch how many cans of worms you want to open.

Just saying.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    10-25-2011, 02:33 PM
  #12
Trained
Bridlewood, you have to remember one thing here in OK. Horses are livestock and thus, property, and the owner can pretty much do as they please with them and that includes refusing to spend money on a vet. About the only thing you can do is to put a 'standard of care' clause in your boarding contract that basically states "the owner agrees to maintain a standard of care that equals or exceeds the standard of care at the boarding facility, Name, located at: Adress, City, County, State, Zip Code". That way you can always say, "At this facility the standard of care is ............ and you agreed to uphold that when you signed the contract to board your horse here. If you now choose to not uphold the standard of care you MUST move the horse off this property IMMEDIATELY.". If they want to stay they will give in.

And for me, refusing EPM treatment is not abuse, however I would have had the horse euthanized immediately upon receiving the results of the test. Since he died before the results came back, then it turned out not to be necessary and the meds wouldn't have made a differance, more than likely.
     
    10-26-2011, 01:33 AM
  #13
Yearling
Animal abuse - ESPECIALLY LIVESTOCK - is extremely difficult to prove. As long as they have food (or don't look emaciated) and water they can have gaping open wounds and it still doesn't count as animal abuse.

Horses are property and property disputes are a civil matter. In the eyes of the law, its like paying your neighbor to park your rare car at his place.. you refused to cover it or park it under cover and now it has severe hail damage which you refuse to fix and now your neighbor is POed that he now has an ugly car sitting on his property. He can't make you fix it and the only recourse he has is to ask you to take it off. HOWEVER, if you signed an agreement that has a "must keep your car pretty" clause where you agree to fix damage to the car with in X amount of days or pay a fine and you don't pay the fine.. he can take you to small claims court and get his fine. Small claims is a whole different world and its completely subjective base on 1 judge's (or jury if you pay for it) opinion.

Your only recourse as Dreamcatcher said is to have a standard of care agreement and kick them out if you and the vet don't agree. I have certain rules about worming and farrier care BUT like I said, I'll override it with a vet's permission or two. I try not to be a dictator.. Its obvious that opinions on horse care vary WIDELY. Unfortunately it's impossible to predict future situations.. You live, learn and update your boarding agreement/rules to cover such instances so it doesn't happen again.
     
    10-27-2011, 12:37 AM
  #14
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by starlinestables    
You live, learn and update your boarding agreement/rules to cover such instances so it doesn't happen again.
Adding "the owner agrees to maintain a standard of care that equals or exceeds the standard of care at the boarding facility,

Thanks for the help!

I did notice from a few of the posts that several were not up to date on EPM.. Only several years ago it was a death sentence, not now. If caught early and treated most horses go on to normal routines and even still compete and win. BO might want to "goggle" and be aware of the early possible signs before "clinical symptoms" start showing.

Here is some basic info, in laymen terms on EPM:
  • Neurological- parasitic disease- transmitted mostly by opossum feces in a feed or hay source. Now showing up in states without opossums, due to feed sources being shipped to mills.
  • 70% of horses are exposed to EPM. Most will test low positive exposureon a blood test. Test about $200. May never show clinical signs.
  • Most horses 98% successfully combat EPM by their own immune system, and do not show "clinical signs."
  • Clinical symptoms tend to show up after "stress or a trauma."
  • Clinical symptoms are rated at levels 1-4. 1= beginning clinical signs
  • To confirm "clinical EPM" requires a spinal tap. $6-800.
  • Currently there are 4 different approved medications. $100-$300 per month. Anti inflammatory drugs are also used to reduce the swelling around the spinal cord. (DMSO, Banamine, Dex, steroids etc)
  • If treatment is started immediately, most horses recover up to 1-2 levels.
Here is a list of common symptoms, As BO, think about EPM, when "something just doesn't seem right." especially after trauma or stress.

Hope this prevents a loss at your barn. Start the meds, don't wait! I caught the symptoms a week before the vet rated EPM at Level 1. The boarder refused the advise of the vet to start medication. 2 people offered to pay for the medication. I still think that is negligence.
     
    10-27-2011, 12:54 AM
  #15
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by starlinestables    
You live, learn and update your boarding agreement/rules to cover such instances so it doesn't happen again.
Adding "the owner agrees to maintain a standard of care that equals or exceeds the standard of care at the boarding facility,

Thanks for the help!

I did notice from a few of the posts that several were not up to date on EPM.. Only several years ago it was a death sentence, not now. If caught early and treated most horses go on to normal routines and even still compete and win. BO might want to "goggle" and be aware of the early possible signs before "clinical symptoms" start showing.


Here is some basic info, in laymen terms on EPM:
  • Neurological- parasitic disease- transmitted mostly by opossum feces in a feed or hay source. Now showing up in states without opossums, due to feed sources being shipped to mills.
  • 70% of horses are exposed EPM. Most will test low positive to exposure on a blood test. Test about $200. May never show clinical signs.
  • Most horses 98% successfully combat EPM by their own immune system, and do not show "clinical signs."
  • Clinical symptoms tend to show up after "stress or a trauma."
  • Clinical symptoms are rated at levels 1-4. 1= beginning clinical signs
  • To confirm "clinical EPM" requires a spinal tap. $6-800.
  • Currently there are 4 different approved medications. $100-$300 per month. Anti inflammatory drugs are also used to reduce the swelling around the spinal cord. (DMSO, Banamine, Dex, steroids etc)
  • If treatment is started immediately, most horses recover up to 1-2 levels.
Here is a list of common symptoms, As BO, think about EPM, when "something just doesn't seem right." especially after trauma or stress.

Hope this prevents a loss at your barn. Start the meds, don't wait! I caught the symptoms a week before the vet rated EPM at Level 1. The boarder refused the advise of the vet to start medication. 2 people offered to pay for the medication. I still think that is negligence.
     
    10-27-2011, 01:03 AM
  #16
Trained
"I did notice from a few of the posts that several were not up to date on EPM.. Only several years ago it was a death sentence, not now. If caught early and treated most horses go on to normal routines and even still compete and win. BO might want to "goggle" and be aware of the early possible signs before "clinical symptoms" start showing."

"Hope this prevents a loss at your barn. Start the meds, don't wait! I caught the symptoms a week before the vet rated EPM at Level 1. The boarder refused the advise of the vet to start medication. 2 people offered to pay for the medication. I still think that is negligence."

Depending on how many horses you are supporting whether to start the meds or not is a matter only the owner can decide. Because of the residual effects of EPM once infected, I choose to put a horse down that tests positive and also because of ongoing economic strain that treating such a horse puts on the wallet, I won't treat for that IN MOST INSTANCES. If the horse is a National Champ or has produced National Champs it's a different story but that's only a few out of a large herd. I do agree that not doing SOMETHING really goes against MY personal grain but as a barn owner, I can't legislate or require all boarders to feel/think as I do. In each case, it's totally up to the horse owner to determine the course of action or non-action that they will take and many don't like to think of things like, "What will I do if I have an EPM infected horse? Will I spend the money to treat it or will I euthanize or just cross my fingers?". I see the same sort of Deer In The Headlights looks from most of my new boarders when I ask, "If your horse became ill, say severe colic, and I could not reach you, how much money would you authorize me to spend in treating your horse before I would have to reach you for further authorization? Would you want your horse to be a surgical candidate for colic?". They haven't thought of it and many DON'T want to think of it or to be the one who makes the hard decisions. I have a spot in my boarding contract where they have to spell out exactly what they want done or don't want done and how much I can spend before contacting them. If they refuse (I've actually had one woman who absolutely could not bring herself to even discuss these kinds of plans), then I tell them I cannot board their horse(s).

The boarders often don't realize it, but they look to the boarding barn owner to be dispassionate about their horses and to have the emergency plans in place so that decisions can be made without emotion muddying things up. That's why when they are all happy about bringing their nice, healthy horse in, I choose that time to get the emergency stuff written down and signed, so when things are super stressful they don't have to be worrying if they've done the right thing for themselves and their horse.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Animal Abuse down my street MightyEventer Horse Health 25 09-30-2010 05:00 PM
stop animal abuse... look at these shocking images....these people need to die kaydeebug Horse Health 31 08-17-2010 09:59 PM
It happened here - animal abuse. Sixxofdiamonds Horse Health 10 06-19-2009 09:25 PM
Animal Abuse Database Spastic_Dove Horse Protection 5 04-10-2009 09:57 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0