Can't use my own pasture ! - Page 2
 
 

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Can't use my own pasture !

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  • Do i have to notify neighbors to tear down fence calgary

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    11-03-2012, 05:30 PM
  #11
Foal
I would move my fence in a couple feet, then put up barbed wire on my property line. If they don't want their champion stud to get hurt - they can build their own fence on their own property ;)
QOS, Sharpie, natisha and 4 others like this.
     
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    11-03-2012, 05:39 PM
  #12
Started
In WA state, stallion owners are legally responsible for fencing in their studs. I would definitely check the laws in your area. That said, if they're not going to, you can't make them. You're stuck with putting up a double fence yourself to protect your mares. Do it, document it, and take pictures so that if the stud damages your property (fences or horses) you can get your expenses back in small claims court if they won't grow up enough to be responsible stallion owners. Sounds like they're pompous idiots, who feel entitled to order the world around at their pleasure.
     
    11-04-2012, 09:12 PM
  #13
Weanling
If it were me, just to prove a point that I can do whatever I'd like on my own property, I'd take down the section of fence that I put up (that your neighbors apparently have assumed is their to use freely), move it over five feet, and let the neighbors build secure fencing for their stallion. Start the project ASAP, that way the neighbors won't have a fence to put their stallion behind BEFORE they put him out there. They do have a duty to ensure that they have safe and secure enclosures for their horse. Stallions are especially hazardous (ask any homeowners insurance that insures horse farms) - the burden is on the neighbors to take care of their horse. The law is definitely on your side on this, no matter what you choose. However, I would suggest taking your fence back a few feet from your property line, anyhow... just so they don't build their own right directly against yours... we personally allowed enough room on the outside of our fence for a utility vehicle to get along it (to make repairs without disrupting the horse in the paddock).
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    11-05-2012, 01:06 PM
  #14
Green Broke
Check the laws on stallions/fencing, etc. WE have someone in the area that gets mad if you ride by their property & get their free-running stallion upset. Talk about being controlling!
     
    11-06-2012, 05:21 PM
  #15
Showing
In Calgary Alberta, as long as a friend's property was beyond the city limits, he could board a stallion, which he did. When the city extended it's boundaries, he received notification that in order to keep a stallion his fences had to be extended to the 6' height. Perhaps there is something like this where you live.
     
    11-06-2012, 06:27 PM
  #16
Green Broke
In Wyoming we are a "fence out" state. That means if you don't want livestock on your property you are responsible for securing your property lines. I keep my fences in very good shape because I want my livestock on my good pastures. I also don't want anything from the neighbors getting in and eating my grasses or breeding my animals.

I would treat your situation the same. I would install an impressive second fence to secure my animals. Even if your area's laws are not the exact same, but taking steps to protect your livestock, you would be in a great position if you ever have to file a complaint on the idjit neighbor who keeps a stallion in a single fenced enclosure.
     
    11-07-2012, 06:37 PM
  #17
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by sillyhorses    
If it were me, just to prove a point that I can do whatever I'd like on my own property, I'd take down the section of fence that I put up (that your neighbors apparently have assumed is their to use freely), move it over five feet, and let the neighbors build secure fencing for their stallion. Start the project ASAP, that way the neighbors won't have a fence to put their stallion behind BEFORE they put him out there. They do have a duty to ensure that they have safe and secure enclosures for their horse. Stallions are especially hazardous (ask any homeowners insurance that insures horse farms) - the burden is on the neighbors to take care of their horse. The law is definitely on your side on this, no matter what you choose. However, I would suggest taking your fence back a few feet from your property line, anyhow... just so they don't build their own right directly against yours... we personally allowed enough room on the outside of our fence for a utility vehicle to get along it (to make repairs without disrupting the horse in the paddock).
This is where knowing the laws in your area are important. In my area when you put up a fence your neighbor automatically owns half of it and it should be on the property line, (not talking paddock but a fence for a pasture) if not they can use your 5' that you gave them and claim immentant domain and legally take it from you.
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    11-08-2012, 02:31 AM
  #18
Green Broke
I would not use razor or barbed wire ..noooo...
I would call zoning. It seems to me, that the Stallion Owner has a larger Liability than a mare owner, and my home owners insurance forbids a stallion, unless it is in a pipe pen , which has to be specific height with the cross bars at so many feet. Personally I would tell them to keep thier stallion away from my mares. You have mostly good advice .
     
    11-08-2012, 03:47 AM
  #19
Green Broke
Id run barb wire on the property line or as close to the property line as zoning laws allow. What you need to find out is if you live in a fence in or fence out state or locality. You need to contact what ever government official , usually animal control would know that. You can probably find your law online. Fence in means you are required by law to keep animals IN your property and are responsible for damages. There are also FENCE out areas, where animals are considered free ranging and if you don't want them on your land you have to fence them OUT... Either way being right legally wont help you if your mares get bred. You could always sue for various damages but that is a pain in the butt. Id just run4 strands X 5 foot high barb wire as close to the line as you can. If they don't like it they can build something to keep their horseoff it.
Seriosly Id be baptized in sheep$##t before Id let some else tell me what I can and can't do on my own land.
     
    11-08-2012, 06:42 AM
  #20
Yearling
I know here stallions have to have double fencing to boundaries.

If they're in an internal yard that fence and the boundary is acceptable.
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