Should I sue? - Page 4
 
 

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Should I sue?

This is a discussion on Should I sue? within the Horse Law forums, part of the Horse Resources category

     
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        08-09-2009, 11:59 AM
      #31
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    Even more to the point, I'd be concerned that the parents could argue that someone close to you was filming the incident, and not trying to help the child.
    Perhaps the video would show the real story, from a neutral standpoint. What did you do to try to stop this girl? Was that reflected in the video? Chances are the video would work against you; it would clearly show the events leading up to the child's alleged traumatic experience.

    Have you talked to your parents about what has happened?
    I told her to get off of him a few times and then I threatened to kick her out of the stables.
    I didnt want to yell and scare my horse and I didnt want to get her off by force because one, I couldn't reach her (he's tall), two, she might have used it against me somehow, and three, I might spook my horse.
    She yelled 'no!' each time I told her to get off. Then she explained that her horse was boring. If she would have asked me for a change, I would have let her.

    The mother said that she COULD have gotten hurt (but she jumped off before he hit the wire fence. She landed on her feet, too). She also said that her daughter wasn't scared and blamed the horse and me because I 'shouldn't have a horse like that at the stables if nobody could ride him' (?).

    I have a written document that shows we had a horse that was not to be ridden by anyone but the owner unless given the permission (by the owner).
         
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        08-09-2009, 12:12 PM
      #32
    Showing
    All I'm saying is that going to court could backfire on you, and you would most likely get countersued for greater damages. That case would most likely win. Yours most likely wouldn't.

    I would also like you to consider the following:
    - Hiring a professional to work with this horse from now on
    - To secure your young or intact stock
    - To provide greater security for persons taking lessons
    - To geld this horse as soon as possible
    - I would recommend you check your state laws regarding stallion ownership.
    - I would strongly suggest you talk to your parents about this situation. You are young and shouldn't be dealing with this alone.

    To me, something in this story just isn't adding up.
         
        08-09-2009, 12:13 PM
      #33
    Showing
    If you have cattle then surely you have a squeeze chute you can run him up into. I'm even more confused now Can't sedate him? I find that hard to believe. I grew up on a cattle operation. Theres no such thing as can't on a ranch. You can alway improvise something. To leave an injured horse untreated because you can't get near him? I find that unlikely. If you leave him to his own and he dies, I think you should be the one to blame not the one who caused the injury.

    ETA- You need to stop worrying about freaking him our more and have him seen to by a vet. I think you are being negligent in your horse care
         
        08-09-2009, 12:16 PM
      #34
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Vidaloco    
    If you have cattle then surely you have a squeeze chute you can run him up into. I'm even more confused now Can't sedate him? I find that hard to believe. I grew up on a cattle operation. Theres no such thing as can't on a ranch. You can alway improvise something. To leave an injured horse untreated because you can't get near him? I find that unlikely. If you leave him to his own and he dies, I think you should be the one to blame not the one who caused the injury.
    We're not leaving him alone. I'm with him all day and I sleep next to his stall at night.

    Yes, we can't sedate him.
         
        08-09-2009, 12:17 PM
      #35
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    All I'm saying is that going to court could backfire on you, and you would most likely get countersued for greater damages. That case would most likely win. Yours most likely wouldn't.

    I would also like you to consider the following:
    - Hiring a professional to work with this horse from now on
    - To secure your young or intact stock
    - To provide greater security for persons taking lessons
    - To geld this horse as soon as possible
    - I would recommend you check your state laws regarding stallion ownership.
    - I would strongly suggest you talk to your parents about this situation. You are young and shouldn't be dealing with this alone.

    To me, something in this story just isn't adding up.
    Me too
         
        08-09-2009, 12:17 PM
      #36
    Super Moderator
    How did you get him out of the fence? Are you saying he went through a barbed wire fence and has received NO medical attention? I'm so confused...
         
        08-09-2009, 12:19 PM
      #37
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TabbyNeko    
    We're not leaving him alone. I'm with him all day and I sleep next to his stall at night.

    Yes, we can't sedate him.
    If he's in a stall, he can be sedated. How are you cleaning this stall that he's in? Is he standing in 3 feet of poop with barbed wire gashes oozing puss? I'm so confused...
         
        08-09-2009, 12:20 PM
      #38
    Showing
    You need to get off your computer and call a vet to see to your horse. If all you have said is true, he needs vet care not your care
    Sorry I find all of this highly unbelievable
         
        08-09-2009, 12:20 PM
      #39
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    All I'm saying is that going to court could backfire on you, and you would most likely get countersued for greater damages. That case would most likely win. Yours most likely wouldn't.

    I would also like you to consider the following:
    - Hiring a professional to work with this horse from now on
    - To secure your young or intact stock
    - To provide greater security for persons taking lessons
    - To geld this horse as soon as possible
    - I would recommend you check your state laws regarding stallion ownership.
    - I would strongly suggest you talk to your parents about this situation. You are young and shouldn't be dealing with this alone.

    To me, something in this story just isn't adding up.
    I don't want to hire a professional. I've been training horses since I was 5. I'm the best you can get in my county. I've been hired by people before.

    My parents are handling most of it.

    For the record, there was a stable hand in the next barn over and she could have asked him about a new horse.

    My parents are handling most of it.


    I'm getting kind of annoyed with arguing with you, so I'd appreciate it if you'd stop trying to change my mind.
         
        08-09-2009, 12:21 PM
      #40
    Yearling
    I'm going to email a couple of horse friends that happen to be lawyers...and will post as soon as they get back to me. I feel like you could sue or atleast file a complaint with the police. The horse is your property...and in my eyes she "stole" your property (imagine someone just taking your car out of the garage and taking it for a joy ride) and damaged the said property. I would make sure to document all the vet bills and photograph everything. Your parent will have to sue though so make sure you have their support. At 14 you are still a minor...so your property is still actually their property legally. I'll get back to you...
         

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