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The struggle draws to a close

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        08-11-2012, 06:19 PM
      #61
    Green Broke
    Barry, did you ever stop to think your wife doesn't want you to take another horse because of the way Di Di's loss has affected you?

    I fear your dieing of a broken heart. Maybe she does to.

    DiDi really meant a lot to you and she was a lucky horse to have you miss her so much. My guess is horses are in your blood and you won't be happy without another one. There can be another special horse in your life all you have to do is open your heart again.

    By the way, how old are you? The neighbor down the street was on his roof the other day tacking down shingles. He's 88.....man, I hope I can do that when I'm 88.
         
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        08-11-2012, 06:57 PM
      #62
    Green Broke
    I was driving down the highway two days ago and I spotted a horse trailer up ahead, I always try to catch up to a horse trailer to see what is inside.
    I caught up to this open stock trailer and there was the most exquisite dappled gray rear end I have seen in quite a long time, and I thought of your DiDi, then I thought of you.
    Best wishes to you.
         
        08-12-2012, 04:30 AM
      #63
    Started
    Guns, there is a saying in English: 'to have a good innings'. It is an expression used in the game of cricket to say that the batsman at the wicket has played a good game for a reasonable time. That's me really.

    I am 73. To be that age and still be even able to ride a horse is some achievment and maybe I should not be greedy.

    As all of us grow older slowly but slowly our bodies start to wear out. Mine is definitely showing signs of wear and tear. Some of the issues are in our minds and we must fight them off. However the little things like humping about bales of hay or straw become difficult.
    The reactions slow down. Sometimes when working DiDi I would hang on when perhaps I should have let go.
    In my case, as an effect of some pills I have to take for an old man's health issue, sometimes I experience a brief loss of balance.
    At other times I am fine although the Pilates exercises are essential to keep the joints moving.

    In the cupboard there is a very expensive protective jacket - designed to provide padding over the spine but several key areas are still left exposed - the knees, the elbows and the very base of the spine. It is also a cumbersome thing to wear and as a result I have only worn it a couple of times.

    All in all, commonsense tells me to give up. I remember Kennie Ross, a
    Busted up Canadian rodeo rider who shipped over to England in 1942 to fight Hitler and who didn't expect to survive the war. But he did. So when he was demobbed he stayed on in the UK, married an English girl (who nagged a bit) and started up a Western riding club. By the time I met him his walk was crab like. All of his body parts were stuck together but not necessarily at quite the correct angle. Out of the saddle he waddled like a duck. In the saddle he could cope. We moved away and I lost touch with the old bu**gar but I think of him a lot these days.

    The sensible thing to do is to give up horses. There is no question about that really. I suppose I am hanging on in the hope I might find a partner
    - preferably a young man with whom I could share a horse. Sadly I don't know one suitable for the position. Perhaps I should have thought of that
    Twenty five years ago.

    Luckily in old age I have discovered writing. There is some pressure on me to publish but it is not that easy to find an old fashioned publisher and yet again I am at the wrong time of life to start. But the hobby of writing makes more commonsense at my age than riding. We'll see.

    Just a tip: as you get older, make sure you 'create' a protogee to follow on.

    B G
         
        08-12-2012, 06:51 AM
      #64
    Green Broke
    You know you don't have to ride a horse.....how about a carriage?

    We ride often in the mountains of East Tennessee, and frequently we see several teams.

    I've thought that when I'm to old to saddle ride I might find a buggy....I always liked the one John Wayne took Lauren Bacall for a ride in the shootist.

    Adapt, overcome......
    thesilverspear likes this.
         
        08-12-2012, 05:12 PM
      #65
    Green Broke
    Ah, dear Barry, I thought that perhaps there was a bit more going on. The devastating loss of your lovely DiDi was truly that, devastating. But, upon reading your latest post, there it was, I suppose, the bit that brought it all together. At this stage in your life, age as well as health, you have said goodbye to not just your lovely DiDi, but to any other DiDi or Joe that may cross paths with you. Good bye to the bit of your life that gave you part of your unique definition.

    But , dear Barry, all your wonderful stories about your many and varied experiences are always to be with you . I'm sure it doesn't comfort you, but you have lived in ways most could only dream of. Oh, how I envision trotting my Walka to the local pub for something cold. But, there isn't a local pub, and it simply won't be.

    I very recently said good bye to my trusted and much loved girl T. Too soon, but I , like you , had to do what was best for her, not necessarily for me. But, unlike you, I have Walka, T's last foal (14 yrs old now) to occupy, no if truth be told, demand my time and energy. I haven't had to make the decision to forgo that part of my life that has been like a dream come true for me.

    I can see the reality of where you are, but I can also see the experience and view that you have to share. I hope you continue to share both with us.

    And Barry, if I have overstepped and presumed incorrectly, please forgive me. I, as many here, have been very concerned with the deep grief you have been dealing with and the effects it can have on health.

    You are a dear soul, and I wish you peace and comfort.

    Tess
         
        08-12-2012, 07:50 PM
      #66
    Started
    No Walkamile, you didn't over step the mark. What you wrote was very appropriate and I thank you for your kind words.

    Barry
         
        08-12-2012, 07:57 PM
      #67
    Started
    Guns, on this relatively small island, the lanes are too narrow and the hedgerows too high to ever think of driving a cart unless one knows how to drive and owns the horse which has been schooled and which has the necessary temperament.
    No, I must keep my eyes open for both a horse and even more importantly a protoge.

    It is said that time is a great healer. Exactly how long is 'time'?

    Barry
         
        08-12-2012, 08:44 PM
      #68
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Barry Godden    
    Guns, there is a saying in English: 'to have a good innings'. It is an expression used in the game of cricket to say that the batsman at the wicket has played a good game for a reasonable time. That's me really.

    I am 73. To be that age and still be even able to ride a horse is some achievment and maybe I should not be greedy.

    As all of us grow older slowly but slowly our bodies start to wear out. Mine is definitely showing signs of wear and tear. Some of the issues are in our minds and we must fight them off. However the little things like humping about bales of hay or straw become difficult.
    The reactions slow down. Sometimes when working DiDi I would hang on when perhaps I should have let go.
    In my case, as an effect of some pills I have to take for an old man's health issue, sometimes I experience a brief loss of balance.
    At other times I am fine although the Pilates exercises are essential to keep the joints moving.

    In the cupboard there is a very expensive protective jacket - designed to provide padding over the spine but several key areas are still left exposed - the knees, the elbows and the very base of the spine. It is also a cumbersome thing to wear and as a result I have only worn it a couple of times.

    All in all, commonsense tells me to give up. I remember Kennie Ross, a
    Busted up Canadian rodeo rider who shipped over to England in 1942 to fight Hitler and who didn't expect to survive the war. But he did. So when he was demobbed he stayed on in the UK, married an English girl (who nagged a bit) and started up a Western riding club. By the time I met him his walk was crab like. All of his body parts were stuck together but not necessarily at quite the correct angle. Out of the saddle he waddled like a duck. In the saddle he could cope. We moved away and I lost touch with the old bu**gar but I think of him a lot these days.

    The sensible thing to do is to give up horses. There is no question about that really. I suppose I am hanging on in the hope I might find a partner
    - preferably a young man with whom I could share a horse. Sadly I don't know one suitable for the position. Perhaps I should have thought of that
    Twenty five years ago.

    Luckily in old age I have discovered writing. There is some pressure on me to publish but it is not that easy to find an old fashioned publisher and yet again I am at the wrong time of life to start. But the hobby of writing makes more commonsense at my age than riding. We'll see.

    Just a tip: as you get older, make sure you 'create' a protogee to follow on.

    B G
    Barry I was saddened until I read to the end of this post. Oh my gosh, sir, with the greatest of admiration & heartfelt request...please do not "give up" put your experiences in writing..find a publisher...heck blog it if you have to...Your ability to write and make your reader feel what you feel, see what you see, hear what you hear is incredible! It may be very healing, not only to you but someone who reads it your journey with DiDi..all that you remember..her nicker sound, her eyes, good times & bad. It may sound corny but God gave you to DiDi and now DiDi gives you to us. Please write!!! It is your gift....it is our gift and I thank you for it!!
    ohmyitschelle and Walkamile like this.
         
        08-13-2012, 05:51 AM
      #69
    Started
    Eclipse, I do feel very flattered by your kind words about my writing. Thank you.

    It is not easy to find an old fashioned publisher these days - yes one could self publish if I could find some professional help but my work needs a critique by an old fashioned publisher. There are literally a few hundred articles which have been written and which sit in this computor awaiting presentation to the reader.

    I'll not be giving up writing nor my link with the horse forum.

    Barry
         
        08-13-2012, 06:49 AM
      #70
    Foal
    We humans form a love and trust bond with a horse, when they are in their paddock we look after their needs, keep feed and water up to them, cover them in winter, remove in summer, they.. the horse in return looks after us when we are on their back... its a contact of sorts...

    Where in this contract is the clause saying someone or something can come take the horse away from us..

    Its one of the hardest things I have had to also deal with recently...!

    The passing of a such loved horse is hard to bare..

    My heart goes out to you in your loss..!

    Tony
         

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