'Alfalfa makes a hot horse'- Myth? - Page 4
 
 

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'Alfalfa makes a hot horse'- Myth?

This is a discussion on 'Alfalfa makes a hot horse'- Myth? within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category

     
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        03-05-2011, 10:15 PM
      #31
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Peggysue    
    we as the owners have to balance the diet research has shown that as another myth
    I'd love to see that research. From my own anecdotal experience, my horse has free choice minerals and I have personally observed him eat his 2:1 calcium/phosphorous vs his 1:1 calcium phosphorous at different times - and other times ignore it all together. Keep in mind he's on a complete vitamin/mineral supplement - and sometimes he goes ages without taking any then suddenly he will go through more for a few days in a row, then stop again. If that's not his body righting itself I can't imagine what is. I also notice changes to how he uses all the minerals in his free choice feeder depending on how hot it is, or if he's growing a new haircoat, etc.
         
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        03-05-2011, 10:20 PM
      #32
    Started
    Variety is what you are seeing... you can also put three different type of hay out and they will eat one for a bit then go to the other and then the other

    I will dig for the research again tomorrow
         
        03-05-2011, 10:25 PM
      #33
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Peggysue    
    variety is what you are seeing... you can also put three different type of hay out and they will eat one for a bit then go to the other and then the other

    I will dig for the research again tomorrow
    I know what you mean about the hay, mine gets different varieties and exhibits that behavior.

    However in the absence of seeing your research, (which I look forward to, and thank you) I have to disagree about the mineral cravings. He literally ignores them for weeks on end, then takes some randomly. I just can't imagine it's not to do with an inner need. Also how do you explain horses that eat dirt - especially foals - who then stop the behavior when free choice minerals are presented? I've seen this firsthand.

    Definitely look forward to seeing your research though. You and I appear to be fellow addicts. ;)
         
        03-05-2011, 10:42 PM
      #34
    Started
    It may take awhile I lost all my links about a year ago and am still collecting them all back and this isn't one I went digging for again yet
         
        03-05-2011, 10:48 PM
      #35
    Started
    Another thing to think about is if they "balance" their own diet why do so many founder? Colic? Dehydrate? Get toxcity? You get my point ;)

    WOOHOO off to dig for that research again
         
        03-05-2011, 10:50 PM
      #36
    Foal
    I, too, would love to read that research. :)

    I believe I heard somewhere that horses will dig to get to minerals in the ground, but can't seem to find it on google.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        03-05-2011, 10:58 PM
      #37
    Foal
    Peggysue-

    They get laminitis/founder because a) I bet the high sugar levels taste great and b) what are they going to do otherwise? Refuse the grass and stand there? No. Food/mineral intake causing a problem vs preexisting deficiencies are very different things.

    Colic can be cause by MANY different things: sand, gas, intestines literally twisted, a blockage, etc etc. Again, intake that causes a problem after the fact is very different than intake to solve a problem. A horse loose in the feed room will never think, "I better not eat this because I'll colic for sure".

    I'm going to be a little edgy and say dehydration is always caused by either inaccess to (proper) water and/or an underlying condition.

    As for toxicity, it's the same causing a problem vs solving a problem thing.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        03-05-2011, 11:00 PM
      #38
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Peggysue    
    another thing to think about is if they "balance" their own diet why do so many founder? Colic? Dehydrate? Get toxcity? You get my point ;)

    WOOHOO off to dig for that research again

    I don't think the point that a horse will overindulge in delicious yumminess exactly counteracts the fact that he will eat dirt, seeking minerals, or chew wood seeking phosphorous - then stop when it is presented to him in free choice mineral form.

    It's even evident to a lesser degree in humans - it's no coincidence that I crave chocolate for magnesium, or steak for iron at 'that time' in fact, if I take magnesium, I no longer want the chocolate. Of course I rarely try to talk myself out of a big fat steak.
         
        03-06-2011, 09:58 AM
      #39
    Started
    But your body doens't know "what" it is craving just that it needs something

    Horses eat dirt for a variety of reasons, same thing with bark off of trees

    There is actually a proven reason why they eat poop.... :)
         
        03-06-2011, 10:21 AM
      #40
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Peggysue    
    but your body doens't know "what" it is craving just that it needs something

    Horses eat dirt for a variety of reasons, same thing with bark off of trees

    There is actually a proven reason why they eat poop.... :)


    Re: poop - for salt, yes? That is what i've read.

    And it seems to be slightly splitting hairs to say your body knows it needs something, not 'what' - lol simply because the body, like the horse and his body, does not speak English and put names to things - but the need is there, which in turn drives the behavior.
         

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